Special Issue "Smart Cities and Infrastructures"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Davide Lo Presti
Website
Guest Editor
Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre, University of Nottingham, Room C11, Pavement Research Building, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
Interests: sustainability; life cycle assessment; recycling; bitumen; asphalt; smart infrastructure; road pavements; railway trackbeds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Nizar Lajnef
Website
Guest Editor
Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan State University, 428 S. Shaw Lane, Room 3568, East Lansing, MI 48824 USA
Interests: sensing systems for civil infrastructure; sensors design and implementation; smart materials/ composites and systems
Dr. Hosin “David” Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Iowa, 4105 SC, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Interests: smart cities; asphalt pavement recycling; sustainable road materials; digital image processing; infrastructure asset management; intelligent sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2019 International Conference on Smart Cities (2019 ICSC) will be held in Seoul, South Korea, 17–19 July 2019 (icsc2019.org: chaired by Hosin “David” Lee). Select papers from ICSC 2019 will be invited for possible publication in Special Issues of the MDPI journal Infrastructures.

The sustainable and resilient management of smart cities is becoming a key challenge worldwide. The objective of this Special Issue of MDPI’s Infrastructures is to compile and archive technological and managerial innovations for designing and managing sustainable and resilient smart cities, which include smart sensors, buildings, pavements, infrastructures, and systems.

Papers are sought in the following areas:

  • Smart pavements, roads and bridges;
  • Smart sensors for homes, buildings, and infrastructures;
  • Smart building maintenance management systems;
  • Smart infrastructure asset management systems;
  • Smart underground pipes and structures;
  • Clean air and air quality monitoring systems;
  • Smart parks and recreation facilities;
  • Clean water and efficient distribution systems;
  • Smart energy metering and power grids;
  • Autonomous and efficient transportation;
  • Smart parking meters and operations;
  • e-Government;
  • Smart video surveillance and crime prevention systems;
  • Smart disaster prevention and response;
  • Smart big data and life-cycle analysis;
  • Operation, maintenance, and safety of smart cities;
  • Smart city and urban planning.

We look forward to listening to your presentations at ICSC 2019 and hope you will consider your paper for possible publication in this Special Issue of the MDPI journal Infrastructures based on peer reviews. Please submit your paper directly to Infrastructures following the journal’s paper submission guidelines before 15 March 2020.

Dr. Davide Lo Presti
Dr. Nizar Lajnef
Dr. Hosin “David” Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart cities
  • smart mobility and transportation
  • smart infrastructures
  • sensor system design
  • infrastructure asset management
  • smart materials
  • pavement recycling
  • railroad tracks

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Development of Smart Pavement Design Sensitivity Analysis Software for Asset Management System
Infrastructures 2020, 5(7), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5070056 - 02 Jul 2020
Abstract
There are a number of pavement management systems, but most of them are limited in providing pavement design and pavement design sensitivity information. This paper presents efforts towards the integrated pavement design and management system, by developing smart pavement design sensitivity analysis software. [...] Read more.
There are a number of pavement management systems, but most of them are limited in providing pavement design and pavement design sensitivity information. This paper presents efforts towards the integrated pavement design and management system, by developing smart pavement design sensitivity analysis software. In this paper, the sensitivity analyses of critical design input parameters have been performed to identify input parameters which have the most significant impacts on the pavement thickness. Based on the existing pavement design procedures and their sensitivity analysis results, a smart pavement design sensitivity analysis (PDSA) software package was developed, to allow a user to retrieve the most appropriate pavement thickness and immediately perform pavement design sensitivity analysis. The PDSA software is a useful tool for managing pavements, by allowing a user to instantaneously retrieve a pavement design for a given condition from the database and perform a design sensitivity analysis without running actual pavement design programs. The proposed smart PDSA software would result in the most efficient pavement management system, by incorporating the optimum pavement thickness as part of the pavement management process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
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Open AccessArticle
BIM Approach for Modeling Airports Terminal Expansion
Infrastructures 2020, 5(5), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5050041 - 07 May 2020
Abstract
Smart societies will make more intelligent use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), which has the potential to transform the way to plan and manage infrastructures. New developments in computer hardware, as well as new applications and software, are changing the face of [...] Read more.
Smart societies will make more intelligent use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), which has the potential to transform the way to plan and manage infrastructures. New developments in computer hardware, as well as new applications and software, are changing the face of the infrastructure sector and society more generally, driving greater efficiency, increasing productivity, and greatly simplifying construction processes and life-of-asset maintenance. In European countries, the adoption of Building Information Modeling (BIM) standards have been expedited. In this research article, the architectural-structural model in a BIM environment of the elevated walkway connecting the gate with the runway, a project named “IV Bridge” under construction for the expansion of the departure area of Naples Capodichino International Airport, is carried out. Software including Autodesk family, Revit for the architectural/structural model, Robot Structural Analysis (RSA) for the analytical verification and Naviswork (NW) for the 4D/5D model were used. The effectiveness and benefits obtained by implementing the BIM methodology are discussed, showing a reduction in terms of construction times and costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
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Open AccessArticle
Integration of BIM and Procedural Modeling Tools for Road Design
Infrastructures 2020, 5(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5040037 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a design and management methodology strongly used in the Industry of Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC). It allows the creation of a 3D model through parametric modelling in a workflow that updates data, geometry and semantics using the [...] Read more.
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a design and management methodology strongly used in the Industry of Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC). It allows the creation of a 3D model through parametric modelling in a workflow that updates data, geometry and semantics using the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) standard. The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a BIM method for road infrastructures. The creation of the BIM 3D models was carried out using different visual programming software and BIM tools, designing the spatial and parametric representation of the roadway. This way, it has been possible to discover the advantages of using procedural modelling to design road infrastructure through software that are usually used in the mechanical and architectural field. Finally, the interoperability of the software to extract and exchange information between these BIM tools was assessed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
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Open AccessArticle
Prevailing Approaches and Practices of Citizen Participation in Smart City Projects: Lessons from Trondheim, Norway
Infrastructures 2020, 5(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5040036 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Citizen participation has become an important aspect in the design of smart cities. This paper investigates the frame and modality of citizen participation in a European Horizon2020 smart city project, +CityxChange, in Trondheim. +CityxChange aims at enabling citizen participation and co-creation in the [...] Read more.
Citizen participation has become an important aspect in the design of smart cities. This paper investigates the frame and modality of citizen participation in a European Horizon2020 smart city project, +CityxChange, in Trondheim. +CityxChange aims at enabling citizen participation and co-creation in the transition to a positive energy city. The question is “what are the prevailing approaches and practices in relation to citizen participation amongst the key actors involved in +CityxChange? Which structures and processes have inhibited or fostered the participation mechanisms (e.g., for, by, and of people) and practices in Trondheim?” Through participatory observations and interviews with key local actors and citizens, we found that the focus of +CityxChange on efficiency and creating innovative solutions “for” people in partnership with the private sector has disturbed the “by” and “of” people mechanisms of participation. Citizens’ power and roles are not delegated to challenge or replace the project’s predetermined issue or plan. The anchorage of the project outside of the formal administrative structure has caused other functional barriers that inhibit citizen participation, rather than facilitate it. This paper discusses the causal relationships between these interconnected barriers and suggests how authorities can possibly overcome them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
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Open AccessArticle
The Governance Approach of Smart City Initiatives. Evidence from Trondheim, Bergen, and Bodø
Infrastructures 2020, 5(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5040031 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
A pragmatic and polity-focused solution for governing a smart city in the direction of sustainability is still missing in theory and practice. A debate about whether a smart city is a pragmatic solution for modern challenges or just a technology-led urban utopia is [...] Read more.
A pragmatic and polity-focused solution for governing a smart city in the direction of sustainability is still missing in theory and practice. A debate about whether a smart city is a pragmatic solution for modern challenges or just a technology-led urban utopia is entangled with the vexed issue of governance. While ‘smart governance’ has drawn unprecedented interest, the combination of its conceptual vagueness and broad applications couple with a lack of focus on its underlying international and local political paradigms have raised concerns about its utility. This study contributes to restoring attention to the original concept of governance, its differences with governing and government, and the potential challenges resulting from its functionality in its real, multi-layered, and complex contexts. This paper explores the intellectual connection between governance and smart cities, from both an empirical and a conceptual/analytical perspective. From the empirical side, we examine which actors, processes, and relational mechanisms at different levels that have had an impact on the initiation of smart cities in three Norwegian cities: Trondheim, Bergen, and Bodø. We illustrate how the structural sources of the interests, roles, and power in smart city initiatives have caused governance to emerge and change, but have also affected the goals designed by specific actors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
Open AccessArticle
Application of Ground Penetrating Radar to Estimate Subgrade Soil Density
Infrastructures 2020, 5(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5020012 - 27 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology has been widely used in pavement assessment over the last decade. Assessing the subgrade condition and monitoring its temporal variation provide valuable information regarding changes associated with pavement deterioration, allowing for the beneficial prediction of future road maintenance. [...] Read more.
Ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology has been widely used in pavement assessment over the last decade. Assessing the subgrade condition and monitoring its temporal variation provide valuable information regarding changes associated with pavement deterioration, allowing for the beneficial prediction of future road maintenance. This paper presents a method to estimate the density and water content of prepared subgrade soils of highly plastic silt using a 2 GHz GPR scan system and a simple exponential model. A bulk density prediction model was developed based on electromagnetic mixing theory to back calculate subgrade soils density. The model developed determines the soil’s dielectric constant, considering dielectric and volumetric properties of the three major components of soil: air, water, and solid particles. A series of laboratory tests was conducted on six (6) soil samples at various density levels to validate the newly developed model. For validation purposes, sand cone and dynamic cone penetration (DCP) tests were performed and compared with the estimated soils strength from GPR data. The results show that the prediction of soils density and stiffness using nondestructive technology helps efficiently forecast not only pavement deterioration, but potential risks to the subsurface pavement structure with all the advances of time saving using air coupled GPR antenna mounted on a moving vehicle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Infrastructures)
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