Special Issue "Pavement Sustainability"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Infrastructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 4264

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Krishna Prapoorna Biligiri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Tirupati, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh 517506, India
Interests: sustainable pavement technologies; asphalt-rubber; pervious concrete; smart cities and infrastructure; quiet pavements; lifecycle assessment of pavements; climate change
Dr. David Woodward
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Reader in Infrastructure Engineering, Ulster University, Jordanstown Campus, Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37 0QB, Northern Ireland
Interests: aggregates; road/tire interface; areal texture measurement; sustainable technologies
Dr. Hosin “David” Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Interests: smart infrastructure; sustainable infrastructure practices; infrastructure asset management system
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the time when the availability of natural resources used to build roadway infrastructure is shrinking along with their increasing costs; there is a need to create sustainable pavement systems made up of smart, innovative, and resilient materials. A sustainable pavement design should be formulated with a focus on a sustainability of the paving materials through a mechanistic design framework while emphasizing sustainability aspects of an automated smart construction and maintenance operations. Pavement sustainability should provide solutions to mitigate unforeseen impacts of extreme weather events and climate changes on pavement performance. It also becomes essential to preserve the existing pavement infrastructures through a robust pavement asset management system with deep learning and big data analytics. Thus, the pavement sustainability is one of the most critical considerations in designing, building and managing future pavement systems.

This special issue aims to publish the high-quality research papers as well as state-of-the-art review articles that focus on sustainability aspects in designing, building and managing pavements. The papers in this special issue should be focused on various advances that have taken place worldwide in sustainable pavement technologies. It is envisaged that the papers will encompass a wide range of topics: sustainable materials for use in pavement structures to lower the cost while saving the environments, laboratory and field tests of sustainable paving materials, smart and automated paving equipment, and automated pavement evaluation using emerging technologies such as drones.

I would like to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of the MDPI journal Infrastructures on pavement sustainability. This Special Issue is very timely and will encompass emerging technology topics including but not limited to the following:

Recycled pavements;
In-place recycling;
High-friction pavements;
Quiet pavements;
High-performance thin overlay;
Warm and cold mix asphalt;
Porous/pervious pavements;
Automated pavement construction;
Automated pavement evaluation;
Deep learning pavement management systems;
Smart pavements for smart cities;
Asphalt-rubber/rubberized asphalt;
Pavement asset management systems;
Lifecycle analyses of pavement systems;
Pavements and urban climatology;
Utilization of waste materials in pavements;
Sustainable field pavement construction practices;
Evolution of tire/surface interface;
Use of local materials;
Predicting the performance of road construction products.

Dr. Krishna Prapoorna Biligiri
Dr. David Woodward
Dr. Hosin “David” Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • recycled pavements
  • high-performance thin overlay
  • automated pavement evaluation
  • automated pavement construction
  • high-friction pavements
  • smart cities
  • impact of pavement materials on climate change
  • lifecycle assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Systematic Review of Permeable Pavements and Their Unbound Material Properties in Comparison to Traditional Subbase Materials
Infrastructures 2021, 6(12), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6120179 - 16 Dec 2021
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Abstract
This paper is a literature review focused on permeable pavements and especially the permeable subbase material. Run-off water from the surface is traditionally let through a drainage system, and the roads are kept dry. Due to climate changes, heavy precipitation and high-intensity rainfalls [...] Read more.
This paper is a literature review focused on permeable pavements and especially the permeable subbase material. Run-off water from the surface is traditionally let through a drainage system, and the roads are kept dry. Due to climate changes, heavy precipitation and high-intensity rainfalls are putting pressure on the infrastructure. Traditionally, water in subbase materials reduces the resilient E-moduli and the lifespan of the pavement design. Studies show that increasing saturation reduces the bearing capacity of a traditional subbase material. Unbound materials with highly grained fines and high moisture content have higher tendency to show reduced resilient E-moduli. One study was found where the E-moduli of five different coarse grained aggregates used in permeable pavements were examined through a triaxial test. It was found that the E-moduli varied from 110–371 MPa. Other studies examining the E-moduli of permeable subbases based on moisture content were not found. However, this paper discusses different experiences regarding the bearing capacity of traditional vs. permeable subbase materials. It also covers a discussion and an analysis of missing research areas that needs to be investigated for further knowledge about the usage of permeable pavements in areas with a risk of flooding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pavement Sustainability)
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Article
Assessment on Bonding Potentials of Trackless Tack under a Thin Overlay
Infrastructures 2021, 6(9), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6090126 - 03 Sep 2021
Viewed by 604
Abstract
Trackless tacks are used to minimize the loss of tack materials caused by adherence to moving tires. During the last two decades, the paving industry and highway agencies have had an increasing interest in the use of trackless tacks to ensure an adequate [...] Read more.
Trackless tacks are used to minimize the loss of tack materials caused by adherence to moving tires. During the last two decades, the paving industry and highway agencies have had an increasing interest in the use of trackless tacks to ensure an adequate bond between the overlay and the existing pavement. Therefore, the need for more studies on the bonding characteristics of various trackless tacks is growing. The purpose of this study is to measure the bonding potential of trackless tacks and identify several variables that affect the shear resistance in terms of bonding strength and energy using statistical analysis. The improvement of interlayer shear resistance by tack treatment is different depending on the tack and surface types. Higher tack reactivation temperatures increase the interlayer shear resistance. Compaction effort is considered to have only a marginal effect on bond performance. Tack and surface types play a more critical role in determining the shear bond strength than residual tack rate in the field experiment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pavement Sustainability)
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Article
Development of Warm In-Place Recycling Technique as an Eco-Friendly Asphalt Rehabilitation Method
Infrastructures 2021, 6(7), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6070101 - 08 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1146
Abstract
Cold In-place Recycling (CIR) has been widely used in the world since it is easy to apply it in the field at a low cost. However, it is not normally used as a surface layer as a result of its inconsistent quality due [...] Read more.
Cold In-place Recycling (CIR) has been widely used in the world since it is easy to apply it in the field at a low cost. However, it is not normally used as a surface layer as a result of its inconsistent quality due to an excessive amount of fine aggregates pulverized during the milling process. Hot In-place Recycling (HIR) can retain the original shape of the aggregates, but it often produces a large amount of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Therefore, a third in-place recycling technique is introduced in this paper: Warm In-place Recycling (WIR). The WIR technique overcomes the limitations of both CIR and HIR techniques by lowering a heating temperature while adding a Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA)/Soybean/SBS additive. To identify the effect of the additive on the RTFO-aged binder, viscosity and dynamic modulus values were measured at different temperatures. Based on Hamburg Wheel Tracking (HWT) and Disc-Shaped Compact Tension (DCT) tests, the additive improved the moisture susceptibility and low temperature cracking resistance. The indirect infrared heating equipment reduced the emission by lowering the pavement surface heating temperature by 20 °C from 140 to 120 °C. Compared with the heating at 140 °C, the LPG usage for heating at 140 °C was lowered by 21%. The proposed WIR equipment with an additive would revolutionize the in-place recycling practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pavement Sustainability)
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Review

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Review
Framework for Design of Sustainable Flexible Pavement
Infrastructures 2022, 7(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7010006 - 31 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
The conventional methodologies for the design of flexible pavements are not adequate in providing solutions that meet the diverse sustainability challenges. Therefore, developing new methodologies and frameworks for the design of flexible pavement has become a priority for most highway agencies. On the [...] Read more.
The conventional methodologies for the design of flexible pavements are not adequate in providing solutions that meet the diverse sustainability challenges. Therefore, developing new methodologies and frameworks for the design of flexible pavement has become a priority for most highway agencies. On the other hand, there is no sound sustainable flexible pavement framework at the design phase that considers the key engineering performance, environmental impact, and economic benefits of sustainability metrics. Hence, premature failure of flexible pavements has become a common problem leading to a growing demand for sustainable pavement. Pavement engineers need to have access to tools that permit them to design flexible pavements capable of providing sustainable solutions under various complex scenarios and uncertainties. Hence, the objective of this study was to develop a resilience analysis framework, probabilistic life cycle assessment (PLCA) framework, and probabilistic life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) framework as the pillars of sustainability. These frameworks were used to develop a single sustainable flexible pavement design framework. The developed framework enables highway agencies to effectively quantify the lifetime sustainability performance of flexible pavements during the design phase in terms of resilience, environmental sustainability, and economic sustainability; and it allows to select the optimum design by comparing alternative design options. The framework will enhance the durability of flexible pavement projects by minimizing the cost, operational disturbance, environmental impact, and supporting the design. Many countries, especially those that fully dependent on the road network as the primary transportation route, may benefit from the sustainability-based road network design, which could ensure dependable market accessibility. The resilience of such a road network may reduce the cost of business activities by minimizing the interruption in surface transportation due to the functional and structural failures resulting from extreme events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pavement Sustainability)
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