Special Issue "Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811). This special issue belongs to the section "Infrastructures and Structural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carlo Rainieri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy – Construction Technologies Institute, Corso Nicolangelo Protopisani 70, 80146 Naples - Italy
Interests: smart structures; smart materials; structural health monitoring; operational modal analysis; earthquake engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Andy Nguyen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Southern Queensland, Australia
Interests: smart structures and systems; structural health monitoring; structural strengthening and rehabilitation
Prof. Dr. You Dong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: risk and resilience; structural engineering; lifecycle engineering; climate change; sustainability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Dmitri Tcherniak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nærum, Denmark
Interests: structural dynamics; signal processing; NVH

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Timely detection of damage is critical to ensuring the safe operation of bridges, wind turbines, and civil infrastructures more generally, allowing early warnings to be issued and to avoid significant life, economic, and secondary losses. Moreover, monitoring can provide relevant information for structural management and maintenance. While two dominant competing philosophies for civil Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) have emerged in the last decades (data driven vs. model-based approaches), several aspects are still worthy of investigation, including the selection of effective damage features and their automatic extraction from response measurements as well as sensitivity to environmental and operational factors, the appropriate setting of statistical models and thresholds in data-driven approaches, the role of system identification and model updating for damage assessment, the optimization techniques to use for a reliable solution of the inverse problem, the prediction of the remaining useful life of structures, and the support to decision making.

The goal of this Special Issue is to discuss the latest achievements in the field of data processing procedures for SHM of civil infrastructures, and multidisciplinary contributions are especially encouraged. Potential topics for submissions include but are not limited to:

  • Optimal sensor layout and automated damage feature extraction (including automated modal parameter identification)
  • Influence of environmental and operational variability on SHM reliability and compensation methods
  • Data mining and data fusion approaches for civil SHM
  • Damage feature selection and comparative assessment of damage sensitivity of different damage indexes
  • Approaches for damage detection, location, extension, and classification from response measurements
  • Techniques for robust solution of the inverse problem in model-based SHM techniques
  • Artificial intelligence in civil SHM
  • Comparative assessment of data-driven and model-based SHM approaches in the context of a given damage scenario
  • Residual life prediction
  • Role of SHM in decision making, including early warning, emergency management, and support to structural maintenance in service conditions
Dr. Carlo Rainieri
Dr. Andy Nguyen
Dr. You Dong
Dr. Dmitri Tcherniak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • structural health monitoring
  • influence of environmental factors
  • damage features
  • inverse problems
  • artificial intelligence
  • residual life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Aspects of Vibration-Based Methods for the Prestressing Estimate in Concrete Beams with Internal Bonded or Unbonded Tendons
Infrastructures 2021, 6(6), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6060083 - 02 Jun 2021
Viewed by 412
Abstract
The estimate of internal prestressing in concrete beams is essential for the assessment of their structural reliability. Many scholars have tackled multiple and diverse methods to estimate the measurable effects of prestressing. Among them, many experimented with dynamics-based techniques; however, these clash with [...] Read more.
The estimate of internal prestressing in concrete beams is essential for the assessment of their structural reliability. Many scholars have tackled multiple and diverse methods to estimate the measurable effects of prestressing. Among them, many experimented with dynamics-based techniques; however, these clash with the theoretical independence of the natural frequencies of the forces of internally prestressed beams. This paper examines the feasibility of a hybrid approach based on dynamic identification and the knowledge of the elastic modulus. Specifically, the author considered the effect of the axial deformation on the beam length and the weight per unit of volume. It is questioned whether the uncertainties related to the estimate of the elastic modulus and the first natural frequency yield reasonable estimates of the internal prestressing. The experimental testing of a set of full-scale concrete girders with known design prestressing supports a discussion about its practicability. The author found that the uncertainty in estimating the natural frequencies and elastic modulus significantly undermines a reliable estimate of the prestressing state. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures)
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Article
The Way Forward for Indirect Structural Health Monitoring (iSHM) Using Connected and Automated Vehicles in Europe
Infrastructures 2021, 6(3), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6030043 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 623
Abstract
Europe’s aging transportation infrastructure requires optimized maintenance programs. However, data and monitoring systems may not be readily available to support strategic decisions or they may require costly installations in terms of time and labor requirements. In recent years, the possibility of monitoring bridges [...] Read more.
Europe’s aging transportation infrastructure requires optimized maintenance programs. However, data and monitoring systems may not be readily available to support strategic decisions or they may require costly installations in terms of time and labor requirements. In recent years, the possibility of monitoring bridges by indirectly sensing relevant parameters from traveling vehicles has emerged—an approach that would allow for the elimination of the costly installation of sensors and monitoring campaigns. The advantages of cooperative, connected, and automated mobility (CCAM), which is expected to become a reality in Europe towards the end of this decade, should therefore be considered for the future development of iSHM strategies. A critical review of methods and strategies for CCAM, including Intelligent Transportation Systems, is a prerequisite for moving towards the goal of identifying the synergies between CCAM and civil infrastructures, in line with future developments in vehicle automation. This study presents the policy framework of CCAM in Europe and discusses the policy enablers and bottlenecks of using CCAM in the drive-by monitoring of transport infrastructure. It also highlights the current direction of research within the iSHM paradigm towards the identification of technologies and methods that could benefit from the use of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures)
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