New Advancements in Medical Education

A special issue of International Medical Education (ISSN 2813-141X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 993

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht (BCRM-UMCU), Utrecht University, 3584 CG Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: pharmacology teaching; medical education; scholarship of teaching and learning

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Guest Editor
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 9, 171 65 Solna, Sweden
Interests: pharmacology; medical education; pedagogy; teaching and learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The medical curriculum prepares undergraduates for the challenges they are about to face in the real world. Not only do these challenges change with time, the characteristics of students and patients also change. Thus arises the need to adjust our teaching methods in order to provide the best level of care for patients and simultaneously support medical students in navigating this complex task. Modern day challenges from the societal perspective which could impact healthcare range from the greying of the population, the expected impact of climate change and persistent inequalities and discrimination in healthcare access. How each medical curriculum addresses modern-day healthcare-related challenges might be different and is therefore of value to share with other educators. This will not only inspire educators, but could also be an invitation to collaborate and share teaching experiences or even materials.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together the diversity of knowledge, experience, and expertise on teaching methodologies employed to address the current societal needs.

Articles may address, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Closer ties with patients and community;
  • Technology and artificial intelligence in healthcare;
  • Planetary health in the medical curriculum;
  • Student-centered and active learning;
  • Artificial intelligence as a tool in the medical curriculum;
  • Team-based learning (TBL) in the medical curriculum.

Dr. Rahul Pandit
Dr. Duarte Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Medical Education is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthcare challenges
  • student-centered learning
  • digital learning tools
  • community-engaged learning
  • artificial intelligence
  • virtual reality
  • patient-centered teaching

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

8 pages, 1772 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Postgraduate Academic Productivity Following a Longitudinal Research Program in a Medical School Curriculum
by Hannah Ong, Shaquille Charles, Joshua Ong, Baraa Nawash, Shavin Thomas and John R. Fowler
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(2), 152-159; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3020013 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 507
Abstract
Early involvement and exposure to evidence-based research during medical school have been shown to play a formative role in students’ holistic development as future physicians. While there are medical schools encouraging research initiatives, few programs implement 4-year longitudinal research in the curriculum. Here, [...] Read more.
Early involvement and exposure to evidence-based research during medical school have been shown to play a formative role in students’ holistic development as future physicians. While there are medical schools encouraging research initiatives, few programs implement 4-year longitudinal research in the curriculum. Here, the authors categorized graduates as pre-LRP or post-LRP and utilized PubMed’s Advanced Search Builder to identify each graduate’s publications with a time frame that began from 1 year to 7 years post-graduation. The data were then analyzed to identify any significant changes between these two cohorts. A total of 1022 medical school graduates from an ACGME-accredited U.S. medical school were included in this study. The average rate of publications annually was 0.47 + 1.43 (pre-LRP) and 0.57 + 1.40 (post-LRP). Additionally, the average probability of at least one publication in a given year was 22% (95% CI: 0.21–0.23) pre-LRP and 27% (95% CI: 0.25–0.28) post-LRP. Lastly, the average probability of at least one first-author publication in a given year was 12.2% (95% CI: 0.12–0.13) pre-LRP and 15% (95% CI: 0.14–0.16) post-LRP. Overall, participation in a mentored longitudinal research program during medical school demonstrated a positive trend in the number and rate of publications. The implementation of a mentored longitudinal research program can contribute to increased research productivity in physicians’ early careers, leading to the development of important research skills, the fostering of commitment in scholarly work, and a deeper understanding of evidence-based medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advancements in Medical Education)
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