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Special Issue "Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

From their advent, nanoscience and nanotechnology appear to deal with the deep structure of matter, substances and/or fields in mutual interaction. However, there are considerable misconceptions nowadays regarding nanoscience about whether it is scaled in time, in space, or in energy. In fact, the real nano-revolution refers to the ability to intervene and model matter at the nano-dimension rather than only describing it in this realm. For this reason, the present Special Issue emerged as an essential service to the international community working with the nano-world at the molecular level in various ways: from the frontiers of new nano-insights to the exotic limiting nano-design and synthesis, towards innovative structures (materials) and functions (methods). As such, the study of nano-matter by nano-interaction (nano-materials and nano-methods) may truly close the dual circle of nano-science (controlling the matter of a substance, i.e., field complementarity and observability) with that of nano-technology (optimizing the matter for the structure and function). After all, the aim of the nano-materials and endeavors for methods should be to make an impact on the integral and integrated (holistic) nano-econo-ecological cycle at large by monitoring the best (re)circulation of natural resources and their transformation for the betterment of everyday life, from the nano-sci-ground to multi-tech-users. This will promote a sustainable knowledge-based economy and society.

Therefore, the main directions of the present Special Issue include, but are not limited to

Nanochemistry of Carbon-Based Systems; Physical Chemistry of Hybrid Nanostructures; Molecular Machines: Design, Synthesis, Functioning; Multiscale Models in Complex Nanochemical Systems; Nanochemistry for Bioactive Compounds; Renewable NanoSystems; Renewable Electro-Nano-Chemistry; Magnetic Nanomaterials; Spectral NanoMethods; Nanotechnovation Management; Strategic Management of R&D in the Nanotech-Based Economy.

Prof. Dr. Mihai V. Putz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanotechnology end-points
  • renewable energy
  • carbon-based materials
  • zero-dimensional materials (metal clusters)
  • 1D materials (nanowires)
  • 2D materials (thin films)
  • chemical interaction
  • supramolecular chemistry (host-guest relationship, surfactants and micelles, biological supramolecular host species)
  • self-assembly
  • template synthesis (macro/meso/micro porous template materials), etc.

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Electrical and Magnetodielectric Properties of Magneto-Active Fabrics for Electromagnetic Shielding and Health Monitoring
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(13), 4785; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21134785 - 06 Jul 2020
Abstract
An efficient, low-cost and environmental-friendly method to fabricate magneto-active fabrics (MAFs) based on cotton fibers soaked with silicone oil and iron oxide microfibers (mFe) at mass fractions 2 wt.%, 4 wt.% and 8 wt.% is presented. It is shown that mFe induce good [...] Read more.
An efficient, low-cost and environmental-friendly method to fabricate magneto-active fabrics (MAFs) based on cotton fibers soaked with silicone oil and iron oxide microfibers (mFe) at mass fractions 2 wt.%, 4 wt.% and 8 wt.% is presented. It is shown that mFe induce good magnetic properties in MAFs, which are subsequently used as dielectric materials for capacitor fabrication. The electrical properties of MAFs are investigated in a static magnetic field with intensities of 0 kA/m, 160 kA/m and 320 kA/m, superimposed on a medium-frequency electric field. The influence of mFe on the electrical capacitance and dielectric loss tangent is determined, and it can be observed that the electrical conductivity, dielectric relaxation times and magnetodielectric effects are sensibly influenced by the applied magnetic and electric fields. The results indicate that the MAFs have electrical properties which could be useful for protection against electromagnetic pollution or for health monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
MnO2 Heterostructure on Carbon Nanotubes as Cathode Material for Aqueous Zinc-Ion Batteries
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(13), 4689; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21134689 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Due to their cost effectiveness, high safety, and eco-friendliness, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs) are receiving much attention nowadays. In the production of rechargeable ZIBs, the cathode plays an important role. Manganese oxide (MnO2) is considered the most promising and widely investigated intercalation [...] Read more.
Due to their cost effectiveness, high safety, and eco-friendliness, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs) are receiving much attention nowadays. In the production of rechargeable ZIBs, the cathode plays an important role. Manganese oxide (MnO2) is considered the most promising and widely investigated intercalation cathode material. Nonetheless, MnO2 cathodes are subjected to challenging issues viz. limited capacity, low rate capability and poor cycling stability. It is seen that the MnO2 heterostructure can enable long-term cycling stability in different types of energy devices. Herein, a versatile chemical method for the preparation of MnO2 heterostructure on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MNH-CNT) is reported. Besides, the synthesized MNH-CNT is composed of δ-MnO2 and γ-MnO2. A ZIB using the MNH-CNT cathode delivers a high initial discharge capacity of 236 mAh g−1 at 400 mA g−1, 108 mAh g−1 at 1600 mA g−1 and excellent cycling stability. A pseudocapacitive behavior investigation demonstrates fast zinc ion diffusion via a diffusion-controlled process with low capacitive contribution. Overall, the MNH-CNT cathode is seen to exhibit superior electrochemical performance. This work presents new opportunities for improving the discharge capacity and cycling stability of aqueous ZIBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Employing Nanostructured Scaffolds to Investigate the Mechanical Properties of Adult Mammalian Retinae Under Tension
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(11), 3889; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21113889 - 29 May 2020
Abstract
Numerous eye diseases are linked to biomechanical dysfunction of the retina. However, the underlying forces are almost impossible to quantify experimentally. Here, we show how biomechanical properties of adult neuronal tissues such as porcine retinae can be investigated under tension in a home-built [...] Read more.
Numerous eye diseases are linked to biomechanical dysfunction of the retina. However, the underlying forces are almost impossible to quantify experimentally. Here, we show how biomechanical properties of adult neuronal tissues such as porcine retinae can be investigated under tension in a home-built tissue stretcher composed of nanostructured TiO2 scaffolds coupled to a self-designed force sensor. The employed TiO2 nanotube scaffolds allow for organotypic long-term preservation of adult tissues ex vivo and support strong tissue adhesion without the application of glues, a prerequisite for tissue investigations under tension. In combination with finite element calculations we found that the deformation behavior is highly dependent on the displacement rate which results in Young’s moduli of (760–1270) Pa. Image analysis revealed that the elastic regime is characterized by a reversible shear deformation of retinal layers. For larger deformations, tissue destruction and sliding of retinal layers occurred with an equilibration between slip and stick at the interface of ruptured layers, resulting in a constant force during stretching. Since our study demonstrates how porcine eyes collected from slaughterhouses can be employed for ex vivo experiments, our study also offers new perspectives to investigate tissue biomechanics without excessive animal experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Nano-Zn Increased Zn Accumulation and Triglyceride Content by Up-Regulating Lipogenesis in Freshwater Teleost, Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(5), 1615; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21051615 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The present study was conducted to explore the mechanism of nano-Zn absorption and its influence on lipid metabolism in the intestine of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Compared to ZnSO4, dietary nano-Zn addition increased the triglyceride (TG) content, enzymatic activities of [...] Read more.
The present study was conducted to explore the mechanism of nano-Zn absorption and its influence on lipid metabolism in the intestine of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Compared to ZnSO4, dietary nano-Zn addition increased the triglyceride (TG) content, enzymatic activities of malic enzyme (ME) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), and up-regulated mRNA levels of 6pgd, fas, acca, dgat1, pparγ, and fatp4. Using primary intestinal epithelial cells of yellow catfish, compared to the ZnSO4 group, nano-Zn incubation increased the contents of TG and free fatty acids (FFA), the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6GPD), ME, and FAS, up-regulated mRNA levels of lipogenic genes (6pgd, g6pd, fas, dgat1, and pparγ), genes of lipid transport (fatp4 and ifabp), and Zn transport genes (znt5, znt7, mt, and mtf1), and increased the protein expression of fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Further studies found that nano-Zn absorption was via the clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanism. PPARγ mediated the nano-Zn-induced increase in TG, and nano-Zn increased Zn accumulation and induced TG accumulation by activating the PPARγ pathway and up-regulating lipogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Microbicidal Dispersions and Coatings from Hybrid Nanoparticles of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate), Poly (Diallyl Dimethyl Ammonium) Chloride, Lipids, and Surfactants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6150; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246150 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Hybrid and antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the presence of poly (diallyl dimethyl ammonium) chloride (PDDA) were previously obtained by emulsion polymerization in absence of surfactant with low conversion. In the presence of amphiphiles such as cetyl trimethyl ammonium [...] Read more.
Hybrid and antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the presence of poly (diallyl dimethyl ammonium) chloride (PDDA) were previously obtained by emulsion polymerization in absence of surfactant with low conversion. In the presence of amphiphiles such as cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DODAB) or soybean lecithin, we found that conversion increased substantially. In this work, the effect of the amphiphiles on the NPs core-shell structure and on the antimicrobial activity of the NPs was evaluated. NPs dispersions casted on silicon wafers, glass coverslips or polystyrene substrates were also used to obtain antimicrobial coatings. Methods for characterizing the dispersions and coatings were based on scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, determination of thickness, rugosity, and wettability for the coatings and determination of colony-forming unities (log CFU/mL) of microbia after 1 h interaction with the coatings or dispersions. The amphiphiles used during PMMA/PDDA/amphiphile NPs synthesis reduced the thickness of the NPs PDDA shell surrounding each particle. The antimicrobial activity of the dispersions and coatings were due to PDDA—the amphiphiles were either washed out by dialysis or remained in the PMMA polymeric core of the NPs. The most active NPs and coatings were those of PMMA/PDDA/CTAB—the corresponding coatings showed the highest rugosity and total surface area to interact with the microbes. The dispersions and coatings obtained by casting of the NPs dispersions onto silicon wafers were hydrophilic and exhibited microbicidal activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. In addition, a major effect of reduction in particle size revealed the suitability of nanometric and cationic NPs (sizes below 100 nm) represented by PMMA/PDDA/CTAB NPs to yield maximal microbicidal activity from films and dispersions against all microbia tested. The reduction of cell viability by coatings and dispersions amounted to 6–8 logs from [PDDA] ≥ minimal microbicidal concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials and Methods 2.0)
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