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Special Issue "Myeloid Cells: Multi-Functional Regulators of Immune Suppression and Tumor Progression"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ali S. Arbab Website E-Mail
Tumor Angiogenesis laboratory, Georgia Cancer Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
Interests: glioblastoma, tumor microenvironment, neovascularization, anti-angiogenic therapy, vascular mimicry, myeloid derived supressor cells, stem cell tracking, cancer imaging
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hasan Korkaya Website E-Mail
Georgia Cancer Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
Interests: breast cancer, metastasis, tumor microenvironment, MDSCs, tumor plasticity, cancer stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Accumulating evidence suggests that tumour-induced immune cells of myeloid origin differentiate into cells that promote tumour growth and invasion in addition to their immunosuppressive role. Although myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were initially identified in cancer patients and mouse models due to their potent immune-suppressive activity, they are now being implicated in the promotion of tumour metastasis by participating in the formation of pre-metastatic niches, angiogenesis and invasion. MDSCs are heterogeneous populations of immature myeloid cells that include monocytic (mMDSC) and granulocytic (gMDSC) subsets, both of which have been shown to be immune-suppressive. However, molecular, biochemical and functional characterizations of the MDSCs in preclinical and clinical settings remain to be explored. Furthermore, the fact that MDSCs are major impediments in conventional as well as targeted therapies provided a compelling rationale to develop and design alternative strategies to target MDSCs.

In this Special Issue of IJMS, editors invite authors to submit work which involves the molecular, biochemical and functional characterization of MDSCs in preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we invite studies that explore the development and design of targeted therapeutics against MDSCs.

Prof. Dr. Ali S. Arbab
Prof. Dr. Hasan Korkaya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •  myeloid cells
  •  MDSC subsets
  •  immunesuppression
  •  immune modulator
  •  tumor Microenvironment and MDSC
  •  vasculogenic myeloid cells
  •  MDSC and metastasis
  •  tumor plasticity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Whole Body Vibration-Induced Omental Macrophage Polarization and Fecal Microbiome Modification in a Murine Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3125; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133125 - 26 Jun 2019
Abstract
Human nutrient metabolism, developed millions of years ago, is anachronistic. Adaptive features that offered survival advantages are now great liabilities. The current dietary pattern, coupled with massively reduced physical activities, causes an epidemic of obesity and chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 [...] Read more.
Human nutrient metabolism, developed millions of years ago, is anachronistic. Adaptive features that offered survival advantages are now great liabilities. The current dietary pattern, coupled with massively reduced physical activities, causes an epidemic of obesity and chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. Chronic inflammation is a major contributing factor to the initiation and progression of most metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Among all components of an innate immune system, due to their dual roles as phagocytic as well as antigen-presenting cells, macrophages play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory responses, affecting the body’s microenvironment and homeostasis. Earlier studies have established the beneficial, anti-inflammatory effects of whole body vibration (WBV) as a partial exercise mimetic, including reversing the effects of glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. Here for the first time, we describe potential mechanisms by which WBV may improve metabolic status and ameliorate the adverse consequences through macrophage polarization and altering the fecal microbiome. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Delineating Pro-Angiogenic Myeloid Cells in Cancer Therapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(9), 2565; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19092565 - 29 Aug 2018
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that myeloid cells are critical in cancer development and therapy resistance processes. Pharmacological targeting of tumor-associated myeloid cells is an emerging approach among upcoming immune therapies. Surprisingly, myeloid cells are heterogeneous, including a subset of the myeloid cell displaying angiogenic [...] Read more.
Recent evidence suggests that myeloid cells are critical in cancer development and therapy resistance processes. Pharmacological targeting of tumor-associated myeloid cells is an emerging approach among upcoming immune therapies. Surprisingly, myeloid cells are heterogeneous, including a subset of the myeloid cell displaying angiogenic properties in solid tumors. There is an urgent need to delineate angiogenic myeloid cell populations in order to facilitate specific targeting of protumor myeloid cells among heterogeneous pool. This review article is intended to compile all the relevant information in the literature for improved understanding of angiogenic myeloid cells and their role in tumor refractoriness to cancer therapy. Full article
Open AccessReview
Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells as a Regulator of Immunity in Organ Transplantation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(8), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19082357 - 10 Aug 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Regulation of allo-immune responses is proposed as a topic for investigation in the current field of organ transplantation. As a regulator, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have received attention due to their ability to control allograft rejection. Concurrently, however, the independent action of Tregs [...] Read more.
Regulation of allo-immune responses is proposed as a topic for investigation in the current field of organ transplantation. As a regulator, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have received attention due to their ability to control allograft rejection. Concurrently, however, the independent action of Tregs is not enough to achieve tolerance status in many situations. Meanwhile, as a multi-functional regulator, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can suppress effector T cells as well as induce Tregs or regulatory B cells (Bregs) in certain circumstances. Furthermore, the importance of a crosstalk between MDSCs and natural killer T cells to induce tolerance has been reported. Thus, orchestration between MDSCs, myeloid regulators, T/Bregs and other lymphoid/myeloid regulators can shed light on achieving allogeneic tolerance. Here, we review the current knowledge in terms of immunological regulatory function displayed by MDSCs in the context of organ transplantation. Ideal control of MDSCs would lead to a reduction of allograft rejection and subsequent long-term allograft acceptance. Full article
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