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Special Issue "Molecular Advances in Hypertension"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Cristiano Fava Website E-Mail
Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Interests: hypertension; cardiovascular risk factors; genetics; fatty acids; epoxyeicosatrienoic acids; antiangiogenic factors; arterial stiffness; oxidative stress; endothelium; fatty liver; obstructive sleep apnoea; nutrition; renovascular disease; metabolic syndrome; pre-eclampsia; platelets; thrombosis

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Constantly elevated blood pressure (arterial hypertension) is the most prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which every year leads to millions of deaths and disability worldwide, especially due to coronary artery disease and stroke. Blood pressure is a paradigmatic example of a complex trait and consequently hypertension is a clear model of multifactorial disease, since many risk factors contribute to its pathogenesis. Thus, molecular aspects regarding extremely different determinants of blood pressure homeostasis could play a role in its pathogenesis, each one with a different effect size, different behaviour, different interactions, and all these aspects may be differently expressed in different individuals, that is, the same algorithm linking all the variables is not applicable to distinct individuals.

This Special Issue will cover at least some of the many “molecular advances in hypertension”, exploring possible influences of genetics and epigenetics components, nutrients, including fatty acids and electrolyte intake, hormonal systems such as the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, the natriuretic peptide network, autonomic nervous system, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adipokines, then angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, and finally the master role of the ageing vascular tree, oxidative stress, the endothelium and the kidney. Even other, less-explored adjuvants of high blood pressure will be included, such as the immune system, the microbiome and the fatty liver.

Assoc. Prof. Cristiano Fava
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hypertension
  • pathogenesis
  • molecular
  • hormones
  • genetics
  • epigenetics
  • fatty acids
  • salt
  • electrolytes
  • renin angiotensin aldosterone system
  • the natriuretic peptides
  • autonomic nervous systems
  • epoxyeicosatrienoic acids
  • adipokines
  • antiangiogenic factors
  • arterial stiffness
  • endothelium
  • kidney
  • immune system
  • microbiome
  • fatty liver

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Association between Advanced Glycation End Products, Soluble RAGE Receptor, and Endothelium Dysfunction, Evaluated by Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Patients with Mild and Resistant Hypertension
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(16), 3942; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20163942 - 13 Aug 2019
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and soluble form of receptor RAGE (sRAGE) concentrations as well as the AGEs/sRAGE ratio in mild (MH) and resistant (RH) hypertensive patients in comparison with normotensive individuals. We also [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and soluble form of receptor RAGE (sRAGE) concentrations as well as the AGEs/sRAGE ratio in mild (MH) and resistant (RH) hypertensive patients in comparison with normotensive individuals. We also evaluated the association between AGEs, sRAGE as well as AGEs/sRAGE ratio and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs). The MH group consisted of 30 patients, whereas 30 patients were classified for the RH group. The control group (C) included 25 normotensive volunteers. AGEs and sRAGE were measured using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The multicolor flow cytometry was used for analysis of CECs and CEPCs. Significantly higher levels of AGEs in RH cohort were observed as compared to C cohort. Furthermore, significantly lower sRAGE levels as well as a higher AGEs/sRAGE ratio were observed between MH and RH cohorts. Significant correlations were found in the MH cohort for sRAGE and CECs, and CEPCs. The elevation of AGEs levels suggests that oxidative modification of proteins occurs in hypertension pathogenesis. The decrease in sRAGE levels and elevation of the AGEs/sRAGE ratio in MH and RH groups may suggest that hypertensive patients are less protected against the side effects of AGEs as a consequence of an insufficient competitive role of sRAGE against the AGEs-RAGE axis. Finally, it may be concluded that the level of AGEs may be an independent predictor of the condition and function of the endothelium. Furthermore, sRAGE may be classified as a potential biomarker of inflammation and endothelium dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Advances in Hypertension)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Conflicting Roles of 20-HETE in Hypertension and Stroke
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(18), 4500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20184500 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for stroke, and understanding the underlying mechanisms of hypertension and hypertension-related stroke is crucial. 20-hydroxy-5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which plays an important role in vasoconstriction, autoregulation, endothelial dysfunction, angiogenesis, inflammation, and blood-brain barrier [...] Read more.
Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for stroke, and understanding the underlying mechanisms of hypertension and hypertension-related stroke is crucial. 20-hydroxy-5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which plays an important role in vasoconstriction, autoregulation, endothelial dysfunction, angiogenesis, inflammation, and blood-brain barrier integrity, has been linked to hypertension and stroke. 20-HETE can promote hypertension by potentiating the vascular response to vasoconstrictors; it also can reduce blood pressure by inhibition of sodium transport in the kidney. The production of 20-HETE is elevated after the onset of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes; on the other hand, subjects with genetic variants in CYP4F2 and CYP4A11 that reduce 20-HETE production are more susceptible to stroke. This review summarizes recent genetic variants in CYP4F2, and CYP4A11 influencing 20-HETE production and discusses the role of 20-HETE in hypertension and the susceptibility to the onset, progression, and prognosis of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Advances in Hypertension)
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