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Interactions between the Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Motility

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Neurobiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1011

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Joint Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193, Japan
Interests: nervous system and gastrointestinal diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Motility of gastrointestinal tracts, such as the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, is regulated by the central nervous system and the enteric nervous system. The peristaltic movement is induced by the activation of intrinsic sensory neurons, which are coupled via modulatory interneurons to excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons projecting into the smooth muscle layer. The central nervous system is also involved in gastrointestinal motor regulation. For example, esophageal motility is controlled by the vago-vagal reflex, and the supraspinal defecation center in the brain stem accelerates or suppresses the spinal defecation center, which controls the enteric nervous system in the colorectum. Impairment of the interactions between nervous system and gastrointestinal motility is closely related to the development of gastrointestinal disorders such as the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

We cordially invite researchers to submit original or review papers addressing the morphology, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of the interactions between the nervous system and gastrointestinal motility.

Dr. Takahiko Shiina
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • gastrointestinal tracts
  • central nervous system
  • enteric nervous system
  • motor regulation
  • peristalsis
  • vomiting
  • gastrointestinal disorder
  • smooth muscle
  • striated muscle
  • sphincter
  • esophagus
  • stomach
  • duodenum
  • jejunum
  • ileum
  • cecum
  • colon
  • rectum
  • rumen

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 4612 KiB  
Article
Clinicopathological Appearance of Epidermal Growth-Factor-Containing Fibulin-like Extracellular Matrix Protein 1 Deposition in the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract: An Autopsy-Based Study
by Shojiro Ichimata, Yukiko Hata, Koji Yoshida and Naoki Nishida
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(14), 7581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25147581 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
This study examined the patterns of epidermal growth-factor-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) deposition in the small intestine and colon to evaluate the association between the histopathological severity of EFEMP1 deposition and constipation and determine the colocalization of amyloid transthyretin (ATTR) and [...] Read more.
This study examined the patterns of epidermal growth-factor-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) deposition in the small intestine and colon to evaluate the association between the histopathological severity of EFEMP1 deposition and constipation and determine the colocalization of amyloid transthyretin (ATTR) and EFEMP1 deposits. In 40 older cases (≥80 years of age), EFEMP1 deposition in the small intestine initiated in the submucosal and subserous vessels, subserous interstitium, and serosa (early stage), progressing to the muscularis propria and peri-Auerbach plexus area (intermediate stage), and finally spreading diffusely to other areas, excluding the mucosa and muscularis mucosa (advanced stage). The colon had a similar pattern of progression. During the middle-to-advanced stages, amyloid formation was observed in some vascular and serous deposits. A subgroup of cases was identified in which EFEMP1 deposition was the only presumed cause of constipation. Additionally, we demonstrated the colocalization of ATTR and EFEMP1 deposition. Apple-green birefringence was detected under polarized light only in approximately one-half of the cases in the small intestine and one-third of the cases in the colon. These findings strongly suggest that EFEMP1 deposits are correlated with pathological conditions of the lower gastrointestinal tract. As the histopathological diagnosis using Congo red-stained specimens is challenging, the combined use of elastic fiber staining and EFEMP1 immunohistochemistry is recommended to identify EFEMP1 deposition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between the Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Motility)
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14 pages, 6730 KiB  
Article
Accelerated Electron Ionization-Induced Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Rat Stomach
by Raina Ardasheva, Veselin Popov, Viktor Yotov, Natalia Prissadova, Mina Pencheva, Iva Slavova, Valentin Turiyski and Athanas Krastev
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(12), 6807; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126807 - 20 Jun 2024
Viewed by 431
Abstract
The influence of accelerated electrons on neuronal structures is scarcely explored compared to gamma and X-rays. This study aims to investigate the effects of accelerated electron radiation on some pivotal neurotransmitter circuits (cholinergic and serotonergic) of rats’ myenteric plexus. Male Wistar rats were [...] Read more.
The influence of accelerated electrons on neuronal structures is scarcely explored compared to gamma and X-rays. This study aims to investigate the effects of accelerated electron radiation on some pivotal neurotransmitter circuits (cholinergic and serotonergic) of rats’ myenteric plexus. Male Wistar rats were irradiated with an electron beam (9 MeV, 5 Gy) generated by a multimodality linear accelerator. The contractile activity of isolated smooth muscle samples from the gastric corpus was measured. Furthermore, an electrical stimulation (200 μs, 20 Hz, 50 s, 60 V) was performed on the samples and an assessment of the cholinergic and serotonergic circuits was made. Five days after irradiation, the recorded mechanical responses were biphasic—contraction/relaxation in controls and contraction/contraction in irradiated samples. The nature of the contractile phase of control samples was cholinergic with serotonin involvement. The relaxation phase involved ACh-induced nitric oxide release from gastric neurons. There was a significant increase in serotonergic involvement during the first and second contractile phases of the irradiated samples, along with a diminished role of acetylcholine in the first phase. This study demonstrates an increased involvement of serotonergic neurotransmitter circuits in the gastric myenteric plexus caused by radiation with accelerated electrons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between the Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Motility)
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