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Special Issue "Underlying Molecular Mechanism of Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Fruit Quality in Tomato"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. María C. Bolarín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept of Stress Biology and Plant Pathology, CEBAS-CSIC Campus Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, E-30100 Espinardo - Murcia, Spain
Interests: Salt Stress; Drought; Plant physiology; Molecular responses; Genomic tools; Metabolome; Fruit Quality
Dr. Francisco B. Flores
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept of Stress Biology and Plant Pathology, CEBAS-CSIC Campus Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, E-30100 Espinardo – Murcia, Spain
Interests: Salt Stress; Drought; Temperature Stress; Plant physiology; Molecular responses; Genomic tools; Metabolome; Fruit Quality
Dr. Isabel Egea
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept of Stress Biology and Plant Pathology, CEBAS-CSIC Campus Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, E-30100 Espinardo – Murcia, Spain
Interests: Salt Stress; Drought; Temperature Stress; Plant physiology; Molecular responses; Genomic tools; Metabolome; Fruit Quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of crops tolerant to abiotic stresses, as salinity, drought, and high temperatures, with equal or even increased fruit quality, is currently a priority objective in agriculture due to the expanding global population and climate change. In this context, tomato is considered a model species for studying abiotic stress tolerance and fruit quality, being one of the most important fruit-bearing crop species in worldwide agriculture and supplementing the highest amount of metabolites to the human diet, given its elevated consumption per capita. Furthermore, a great wealth of genetic resources are available, including cultivated and wild-related species, traditional varieties or landraces, mutants, etc. This Special Issue is focused on the progress achieved in deciphering the physiological, molecular, and metabolic mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance and fruit quality in tomato as well as the interaction between abiotic stress and fruit quality, since the fruit quality properties of tomato can be strongly modified by environmental conditions. Papers submitted to this Special Issue must report innovative research results and perspectives about the identification of key genes and mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance and fruit quality of tomato, through the use of different strategic approaches, including omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, ionomics, etc.) as well as genetics and molecular, physiological, and anatomicals tools.

Prof. Dr. María C. Bolarín
Dr. Francisco B. Flores
Dr. Isabel Egea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Salt Stress
  • Drought
  • Temperature Stress
  • Wild species
  • Traditional varieties
  • Genomic
  • Molecular breeding
  • Physiological response
  • Transcriptome
  • Proteome
  • Metabolome
  • Ionome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhization on Fruit Quality in Industrialized Tomato Production
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(19), 7029; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21197029 - 24 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1583
Abstract
Industrialized tomato production faces a decrease in flavors and nutritional value due to conventional breeding. Moreover, tomato production heavily relies on nitrogen and phosphate fertilization. Phosphate uptake and improvement of fruit quality by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are well-studied. We addressed the question [...] Read more.
Industrialized tomato production faces a decrease in flavors and nutritional value due to conventional breeding. Moreover, tomato production heavily relies on nitrogen and phosphate fertilization. Phosphate uptake and improvement of fruit quality by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are well-studied. We addressed the question of whether commercially used tomato cultivars grown in a hydroponic system can be mycorrhizal, leading to improved fruit quality. Tomato plants inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis were grown under different phosphate concentrations and in substrates used in industrial tomato production. Changes in fruit gene expression and metabolite levels were checked by RNAseq and metabolite determination, respectively. The tests revealed that reduction of phosphate to 80% and use of mixed substrate allow AM establishment without affecting yield. By comparing green fruits from non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal plants, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to possibly be involved in processes regulating fruit maturation and nutrition. Red fruits from mycorrhizal plants showed a trend of higher BRIX values and increased levels of carotenoids in comparison to those from non-mycorrhizal plants. Free amino acids exhibited up to four times higher levels in red fruits due to AM, showing the potential of mycorrhization to increase the nutritional value of tomatoes in industrialized production. Full article
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Article
The Salt Sensitivity Induced by Disruption of Cell Wall-Associated Kinase 1 (SlWAK1) Tomato Gene Is Linked to Altered Osmotic and Metabolic Homeostasis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(17), 6308; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21176308 - 31 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 605
Abstract
Tomato cell wall-associated kinase 1 (SlWAK1) has only been studied in biotic stress response and hence its function in abiotic stress remains unknown. In a screening under salinity of an insertional mutant collection of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a mutant [...] Read more.
Tomato cell wall-associated kinase 1 (SlWAK1) has only been studied in biotic stress response and hence its function in abiotic stress remains unknown. In a screening under salinity of an insertional mutant collection of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a mutant exhibiting lower degree of leaf chlorosis than wild type (WT) together with reduced leaf Na+ accumulation was selected. Genetic analysis of the mutation revealed that a single T-DNA insertion in the SlWAK1 gene was responsible of the mutant phenotype. Slwak1 null mutant reduced its shoot growth compared with WT, despite its improved Na+ homeostasis. SlWAK1 disruption affected osmotic homeostasis, as leaf water content was lower in mutant than in WT under salt stress. In addition, Slwak1 altered the source-sink balance under salinity, by increasing sucrose content in roots. Finally, a significant fruit yield reduction was found in Slwak1 vs. WT under long-term salt stress, mainly due to lower fruit weight. Our results show that disruption of SlWAK1 induces a higher sucrose transport from source leaf to sink root, negatively affecting fruit, the main sink at adult stage. Full article
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