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Special Issue "Current Advances in Cellular Agriculture"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 6320

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ricardo M. Gouveia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biosciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
Interests: tissue engineering; cell-surface interactions; bio-fabrication; cultured meat; 3D bio-printing; mechanotransduction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cellular agriculture is a new field of biotechnology focused on the development of animal products from cells rather than animals. This includes (but is not limited to) food produce such as meat, milk, and eggs, as well as non-food products like leather, horn, and fur. The science underpinning cellular agriculture derives from numerous research areas, with tissue & bioprocess engineering, synthetic biology, and materials science being the most relevant. Indeed, its feasibility is supported by relatively recent scientific and technological advances in these areas, particularly aiming the development of new biotherapeutics, biopharmaceutics, and bioartificial transplants. The rapid growth of cellular agriculture has also been driven by the increased perception of mounting impacts from intensive animal farming, namely on human health, animal welfare, and the environment. However, and despite considerable investment in industries of the field, there is at present a recognised gap in fundamental and methodological knowledge that risks halting or delaying its further expansion. This is in part a legacy issue – as previous studies focused on understanding mechanisms of disease and develop appropriate therapeutic solutions, fewer limitations in terms of product price and consumer acceptance were considered.

This special issue therefore aims at addressing this gap. We welcome articles with a strong focus on cell and stem cell biology, microbiology, molecular and synthetic biology, and biochemical/metabolic engineering, as well as other intersecting topics related with promoting the advancement of cellular agriculture.

Dr. Ricardo M. Gouveia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Cellular agriculture
  • Cellular/cultured meat
  • Milk equivalents
  • Egg equivalents
  • Alternative protein sources
  • Alternative fat sources
  • Muscle tissue engineering
  • Adipose tissue engineering
  • Animal cell isolation
  • Stem cell proliferation
  • Edible scaffolds
  • Bioreactors
  • Bio-manufacture
  • Tissue templating
  • Metabolic engineering
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Antioxidants
  • Serum-free media
  • Antibiotic use reduction
  • Design of experiments

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Bovine Satellite Cells Isolated after 2 and 5 Days of Tissue Storage Maintain the Proliferative and Myogenic Capacity Needed for Cultured Meat Production
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(16), 8376; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22168376 - 04 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1239
Abstract
Cultured meat is an emerging alternative food technology which aims to deliver a more ethical, sustainable, and healthy muscle-tissue-derived food item compared to conventional meat. As start-up companies are rapidly forming and accelerating this technology, many aspects of this multi-faceted science have still [...] Read more.
Cultured meat is an emerging alternative food technology which aims to deliver a more ethical, sustainable, and healthy muscle-tissue-derived food item compared to conventional meat. As start-up companies are rapidly forming and accelerating this technology, many aspects of this multi-faceted science have still not been investigated in academia. In this study, we investigated if bovine satellite cells with the ability to proliferate and undergo myogenic differentiation could be isolated after extended tissue storage, for the purpose of increasing the practicality for cultured meat production. Proliferation of bovine satellite cells isolated on the day of arrival or after 2 and 5 days of tissue storage were analyzed by metabolic and DNA-based assays, while their myogenic characteristics were investigated using RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence. Extended tissue storage up to 5 days did not negatively affect proliferation nor the ability to undergo fusion and create myosin heavy chain-positive myotubes. The expression patterns of myogenic and muscle-specific genes were also not affected after tissue storage. In fact, the data indicated a positive trend in terms of myogenic potential after tissue storage, although it was non-significant. These results suggest that the timeframe of which viable myogenic satellite cells can be isolated and used for cultured meat production can be greatly extended by proper tissue storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Cellular Agriculture)
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Review

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Review
Immortalizing Cells for Human Consumption
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(21), 11660; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222111660 - 28 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
The need to produce immortal, food-relevant cell lines is one of the most pressing challenges of cellular agriculture, the field which seeks to produce meat and other animal products via tissue engineering and synthetic biology. Immortal cell lines have a long and complicated [...] Read more.
The need to produce immortal, food-relevant cell lines is one of the most pressing challenges of cellular agriculture, the field which seeks to produce meat and other animal products via tissue engineering and synthetic biology. Immortal cell lines have a long and complicated story, from the first recognized immortal human cell lines taken from Henrietta Lacks, to today, where they are used to assay toxicity and produce therapeutics, to the future, where they could be used to create meat without harming an animal. Although work in immortal cell lines began more than 50 years ago, there are few existing cell lines made of species and cell types appropriate for cultured meat. Cells in cultured meat will be eaten by consumers; therefore, cultured meat cell lines will also require unique attributes not selected for in other cell line applications. Specifically, cultured meat cell lines will need to be approved as safe for consumption as food, proliferate and differentiate efficiently at industrial scales, and have desirable taste, texture, and nutrition characteristics for consumers. This paper defines what cell lines are needed, the existing methods to produce new cell lines and their limitations, and the unique considerations of cell lines used in cultured meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Cellular Agriculture)
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Review
Cell Sources for Cultivated Meat: Applications and Considerations throughout the Production Workflow
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(14), 7513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147513 - 13 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3000
Abstract
Cellular agriculture is an emerging scientific discipline that leverages the existing principles behind stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and animal sciences to create agricultural products from cells in vitro. Cultivated meat, also known as clean meat or cultured meat, is a prominent subfield [...] Read more.
Cellular agriculture is an emerging scientific discipline that leverages the existing principles behind stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and animal sciences to create agricultural products from cells in vitro. Cultivated meat, also known as clean meat or cultured meat, is a prominent subfield of cellular agriculture that possesses promising potential to alleviate the negative externalities associated with conventional meat production by producing meat in vitro instead of from slaughter. A core consideration when producing cultivated meat is cell sourcing. Specifically, developing livestock cell sources that possess the necessary proliferative capacity and differentiation potential for cultivated meat production is a key technical component that must be optimized to enable scale-up for commercial production of cultivated meat. There are several possible approaches to develop cell sources for cultivated meat production, each possessing certain advantages and disadvantages. This review will discuss the current cell sources used for cultivated meat production and remaining challenges that need to be overcome to achieve scale-up of cultivated meat for commercial production. We will also discuss cell-focused considerations in other components of the cultivated meat production workflow, namely, culture medium composition, bioreactor expansion, and biomaterial tissue scaffolding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Cellular Agriculture)
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