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The Role of Natural Compounds in Cancer and Inflammation

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 1924

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Natural products are treasures given to us by nature. Millions of years of evolution have allowed most natural products to develop specific biological activities. An increasing number of studies have shown that natural products possess anticancer, anti-inflammatory and other beneficial properties. These natural products can inhibit the growth and spread of tumors and tumor cells. They can also improve human immunity to help the body resist cancer. Therefore, the application of natural products in the field of medicine is becoming increasingly important. With further research on natural products, more medicines have been developed, such as aspirin and resveratrol. Many natural products have complex structures and various activities, which play an important role in organic synthesis and biological activity research. This Special Issue aims to collect papers focused on the discovery of new natural products and the elucidation of their role in cancer, autoimmune conditions and other diseases. Both research articles and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Elia Ranzato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • natural compounds
  • oxidative stress
  • anti-cancer
  • anti-inflammatory
  • natural product synthesis and biological activities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2451 KiB  
Article
Pseudolaric Acid B Targets CD147 to Selectively Kill Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells
by Sheng Zou, Ekaterina Parfenova, Nikolina Vrdoljak, Mark D. Minden and Paul A. Spagnuolo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(12), 6517; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126517 - 13 Jun 2024
Viewed by 203
Abstract
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer. With low survival rates, new drug targets are needed to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) is a plant-derived bioactive compound predicted to interact with cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147/BSG). [...] Read more.
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer. With low survival rates, new drug targets are needed to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) is a plant-derived bioactive compound predicted to interact with cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147/BSG). CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed in various malignancies with suggested roles in regulating cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis. However, the detailed function of PAB in AML remains unknown. In this study, AML cell lines and patient-derived cells were used to show that PAB selectively targeted AML (IC50: 1.59 ± 0.47 µM). Moreover, proliferation assays, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting confirmed that PAB targeting of CD147 resulted in AML cell apoptosis. Indeed, the genetic silencing of CD147 significantly suppressed AML cell growth and attenuated PAB activity. Overall, PAB imparts anti-AML activity through transmembrane glycoprotein CD147. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Natural Compounds in Cancer and Inflammation)
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20 pages, 2962 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Anti-Osteoarthritis Potential of Standardized Boswellia serrata Gum Resin Extract in Alleviating Knee Joint Pathology and Inflammation in Osteoarthritis-Induced Models
by Yean-Jung Choi, Jae In Jung, Jaewoo Bae, Jae Kyoung Lee and Eun Ji Kim
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(6), 3218; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25063218 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1227
Abstract
Osteoarthritis is a widespread chronic degenerative disease marked by the deterioration of articular cartilage, modifications in subchondral bone, and a spectrum of symptoms, including pain, stiffness, and disability. Ultimately, this condition impairs the patient’s quality of life. This study aimed to evaluate the [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis is a widespread chronic degenerative disease marked by the deterioration of articular cartilage, modifications in subchondral bone, and a spectrum of symptoms, including pain, stiffness, and disability. Ultimately, this condition impairs the patient’s quality of life. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of standardized Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSRE) in a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis. A total of 60 rats were allocated into six groups: normal control group (NC), osteoarthritis control (injected with MIA, OC), O + B50 (injected with MIA and treated with 50 mg/kg body weight (BW) BSRE), O + B75 (injected with MIA and treated with 75 mg/kg BW BSRE), O + B100 (injected with MIA and treated with 100 mg/kg BW BSRE), and O + M (injected with MIA and treated with 150 mg/kg BW methyl sulfonyl methane). Several parameters, including knee joint swelling, histopathological changes, and the expression of collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan, were comprehensively assessed. Concurrently, the serum levels and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were analyzed in both the serum and knee joint synovium. The results demonstrated that BSRE significantly mitigated knee joint swelling, cartilage destruction, and tissue deformation. Notably, BSRE administration markedly upregulated the expression of COL2A1 and aggrecan while concurrently reducing levels of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Furthermore, a substantial decrease was observed in the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, IL-6, TNF-α and MMP-3 and -13, thereby indicating promising therapeutic implications for osteoarthritis. In conclusion, BSRE exhibited anti-inflammatory properties and inhibited cartilage matrix degradation in a rat model of MIA-induced osteoarthritis, with the O + B100 group showing significant reductions in swelling and notable improvements in joint cartilage damage. These findings illuminate the preventive and therapeutic potential of BSRE for osteoarthritis treatment, emphasizing the criticality of exhaustive evaluation of novel compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Natural Compounds in Cancer and Inflammation)
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