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Studies on Lactic Acid Bacteria and Their Products in Health and Diseases 2.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2024) | Viewed by 7267

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Grassland and Forages Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Cheonan 31000, Republic of Korea
Interests: obesity; muscle cells; adipocytes; biological role of natural compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Energy and Engineering, Kyonggi University, Youngtong-Gu, Suwon 16227, Republic of Korea
Interests: waste degrdation; nanomanure on water and waster treatment; nano composting and vermicomposting; greenhouse gas; biochar; water and wastewater pollution monitoring and treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are ubiquitous microorganisms that can be found in many natural sources such as plants, mammal’s intestinal mucosa, and fermented foods. They are generally recognized as safe for food applications. Direct supplementation of LAB as probiotics or LAB-driven fermented products possess a wide range of health-promoting effects on molecular and metabolic levels in humans and animals, including protection against infection-causing agents, free radical-scavenging effects, obesity and their metabolic diseases, anti-diabetic mellitus, immunomodulatory and allergy reactions, anti-cancers, prevention of antibiotics associated complications, reduction in blood pressures, modulation of gut-associated microbial population and enhancing nutrient utilization, etc. Therefore, the current Special Issue will bring together recent research on the role of LAB in the prevention/management of metabolic diseases and disorders, with the aim of producing a better understanding of biological mechanisms. The different disciplinary topics include but are not limited to:

  • Probiotic LAB
  • Nutrition
  • Gut-associated microbes
  • Metabolic diseases and disorders
  • Carbohydrate and fat metabolisms
  • Insulin-resistant and sensitivity
  • Free radicals, antioxidants, hepatoprotective
  • Myogenesis, adipogenesis, osteogenesis
  • Nutrient utilization
  • Immunomodulation and inflammations

Dr. Ilavenil Soundharrajan
Dr. Ravindran Balasubramani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 3262 KiB  
Article
Lactiplantibacillus plantarum HY7718 Improves Intestinal Integrity in a DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis Mouse Model by Suppressing Inflammation through Modulation of the Gut Microbiota
by Hyeon-Ji Kim, Hye-Jin Jeon, Joo-Yun Kim, Jae-Jung Shim and Jae-Hwan Lee
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(1), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25010575 - 1 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1498
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic condition that causes persistent inflammation in the digestive system, is closely associated with the intestinal microbiome. Here, we evaluated the effects of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum HY7718 (HY7718) on IBD symptoms in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic condition that causes persistent inflammation in the digestive system, is closely associated with the intestinal microbiome. Here, we evaluated the effects of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum HY7718 (HY7718) on IBD symptoms in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral administration of HY7718 led to significant improvement in the disease activity index score and the histological index, as well as preventing weight loss, in model mice. HY7718 upregulated the expression of intestinal tight junction (TJ)-related genes and downregulated the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in the TLR/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway. Additionally, HY7718 reduced the blood levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as reversing DSS-induced changes to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. HY7718 also increased the percentage of beneficial bacteria (Lactiplantibacillus and Bifidobacterium), which correlated positively with the expression of intestinal TJ-related genes. Finally, HY7718 decreased the population of pathogens such as Escherichia, which correlated with IBD symptoms. The data suggest that HY7718 improves intestinal integrity in colitis model mice by regulating the expression of TJ proteins and inflammatory cytokines, as well as the composition of the intestinal microflora. Thus, L. plantarum HY7718 may be suitable as a functional supplement that improves IBD symptoms and gut health. Full article
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21 pages, 5022 KiB  
Article
Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Mastitis-Causing Staphylococci and Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Raw Sheep’s Milk
by Ilias Apostolakos, Theodora Skarlatoudi, Kornilia Vatavali, Agathi Giannouli, Loulouda Bosnea and Marios Mataragas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(18), 13883; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241813883 - 9 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1542
Abstract
Dairy products play a crucial role in human nutrition as they provide essential nutrients. However, the presence of diverse microorganisms in these products can pose challenges to food safety and quality. Here, we provide a comprehensive molecular characterization of a diverse collection of [...] Read more.
Dairy products play a crucial role in human nutrition as they provide essential nutrients. However, the presence of diverse microorganisms in these products can pose challenges to food safety and quality. Here, we provide a comprehensive molecular characterization of a diverse collection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and staphylococci isolated from raw sheep’s milk. Whole-genome sequencing, phenotypic characterization, and bioinformatics were employed to gain insight into the genetic composition and functional attributes of these bacteria. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of various genetic elements. Important toxin-related genes in staphylococci that contribute to their pathogenic potential were identified and confirmed using phenotypic assays, while adherence-related genes, which are essential for attachment to host tissues, surfaces in the dairy environment, and the creation of biofilms, were also present. Interestingly, the Staphylococcus aureus isolates belonged to sequence type 5, which largely consists of methicillin-susceptible isolates that have been involved in severe nosocomial infections. Although genes encoding methicillin resistance were not identified, multiple resistance genes (RGs) conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, and fluroquinolones were found. In contrast, LAB had few inherently present RGs and no virulence genes, suggesting their likely safe status as food additives in dairy products. LAB were also richer in bacteriocins and carbohydrate-active enzymes, indicating their potential to suppress pathogens and effectively utilize carbohydrate substrates, respectively. Additionally, mobile genetic elements, present in both LAB and staphylococci, may facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of genetic traits, including RGs, virulence genes, and metabolic factors, with implications for food quality and public health. The molecular and phenotypic characterization presented herein contributes to the effort to mitigate risks and infections (e.g., mastitis) and enhance the safety and quality of milk and products thereof. Full article
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15 pages, 8375 KiB  
Article
Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 Attenuated Cyclophosphamide-Induced Liver Injury in Mice by Regulating the Nrf2/ARE Signaling Pathway
by Tao You, Yu Zhao, Shanji Liu and Hengyi Xu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(17), 13424; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241713424 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Cyclophosphamide causes side effects in cancer patients, including hepatotoxicity. Probiotics have recently emerged as potential approaches for the administration of many diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 against cyclophosphamide-induced liver injury and elucidate the underlying mechanism. [...] Read more.
Cyclophosphamide causes side effects in cancer patients, including hepatotoxicity. Probiotics have recently emerged as potential approaches for the administration of many diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 against cyclophosphamide-induced liver injury and elucidate the underlying mechanism. In this study, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were pre-administered to mice with varying duration (1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks) before being intraperitoneally injected with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 7 days to induce liver injury. Results demonstrated that cyclophosphamide-induced liver injury was characterized by histopathological disorders, including irregular central venous shape and hepatic vascular rupture, as well as a severe inflammation response and oxidative stress. The administration of probiotics for 3 weeks exerted the most significant improvements in alleviating liver injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation when compared to the shorter intervention duration. Notably, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 exhibited more pronounced effects than Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Furthermore, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 enhanced the antioxidant defense system by activating the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, ultimately alleviating hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, this study highlighted the potential of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum P101 to alleviate cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity. Full article
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23 pages, 7992 KiB  
Article
Ability of Lactobacillus brevis 47f to Alleviate the Toxic Effects of Imidacloprid Low Concentration on the Histological Parameters and Cytokine Profile of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)
by Nikita Kochetkov, Svetlana Smorodinskaya, Aleksey Vatlin, Dmitry Nikiforov-Nikishin, Alexei Nikiforov-Nikishin, Valery Danilenko, Klimuk Anastasia, Diana Reznikova, Yelena Grishina, Sergei Antipov and Maria Marsova
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(15), 12290; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241512290 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1427
Abstract
In the present article, the possible mitigation of the toxic effect of imidacloprid low-concentration chronic exposure on Danio rerio by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus brevis 47f (1 × 108 CFU/g) was examined. It was found that even sublethal concentration (2500 µg/L) could [...] Read more.
In the present article, the possible mitigation of the toxic effect of imidacloprid low-concentration chronic exposure on Danio rerio by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus brevis 47f (1 × 108 CFU/g) was examined. It was found that even sublethal concentration (2500 µg/L) could lead to the death of some fish during the 60-day chronic experiment. However, the use of Lactobacillus brevis 47f partially reduced the toxic effects, resulting in an increased survival rate and a significant reduction of morphohistological lesions in the intestines and kidneys of Danio rerio. The kidneys were found to be the most susceptible organ to toxic exposure, showing significant disturbances. Calculation of the histopathological index, measurement of morphometric parameters, and analysis of principal components revealed the most significant parameters affected by the combined action of imidacloprid and Lactobacillus brevis 47f. This effect of imidacloprid and the probiotic strain had a multidirectional influence on various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8). Therefore, the results suggest the possibility of further studying the probiotic strain Lactobacillus brevis 47f as a strain that reduces the toxic effects of xenobiotics. Additionally, the study established the possibility of using imidacloprid as a model toxicant to assess the detoxification ability of probiotics on the kidney and gastrointestinal tract of fish. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 1078 KiB  
Review
Intestinal Microbiotas and Alcoholic Hepatitis: Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Value
by Jiazhen Zheng, Ziyi Li and Hengyi Xu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(19), 14809; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241914809 - 30 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1123
Abstract
Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a rapidly progressing and severe stage of alcoholic liver disease, presenting a grim prognosis. Extensive research has elucidated several underlying mechanisms that contribute to the development of AH, including metabolic alterations, immune stimulation, and intestinal dysbiosis. These pathological changes [...] Read more.
Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a rapidly progressing and severe stage of alcoholic liver disease, presenting a grim prognosis. Extensive research has elucidated several underlying mechanisms that contribute to the development of AH, including metabolic alterations, immune stimulation, and intestinal dysbiosis. These pathological changes intricately intertwine during the progression of AH. Notably, recent studies have increasingly highlighted the pivotal role of alterations in the intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of AH. Consequently, future investigations should place significant emphasis on exploring the dynamics of intestinal microbiota. In this comprehensive review, we consolidate the primary causes of AH while underscoring the influence of gut microbes. Furthermore, by examining AH treatment strategies, we delineate the potential therapeutic value of interventions targeting the gut microbiota. Given the existing limitations in AH treatment options, we anticipate that this review will contribute to forthcoming research endeavors aimed at advancing AH treatment modalities. Full article
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