Special Issue "Spatial Analysis of Pollution and Risk in a Changing Climate"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Jason K. Levy

Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management, University of Hawaii, Kapolei, HI 96707, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fuzzy systems; evolutionary algorithms; neural networks; artificial intelligence; network security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue deals with spatial issues pertaining for the management of air, land and water pollution. This issue is particularly urgent and important in the wake of the destructive 2017 Hurricane Season. For example, Hurricane Harvey caused the release of hazardous materials into the environment. At US Gulf Coast industrial facilities, at least 14 toxic waste sites were flooded or damaged and 100 spills of hazardous substances have been reported. In Texas, USA, many plants released of hazardous airborne emissions. There are a number of advances in geospatial tools for analyzing environmental pollution. Remote sensing tools, such as Landsat enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+), shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM), and sequential Landsat satellite images, can be used to detect environmental pollution while spaceborne platforms, such as Terra, Aqua, Aura, and ENVISAT have provided new insights into the understanding of the Earth’s atmosphere.

Prof. Dr. Jason K. Levy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pollution modeling
  • disaster risk
  • chemical hazards
  • satellite data
  • emissions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Critical Review of Methods to Estimate PM2.5 Concentrations within Specified Research Region
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(9), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7090368
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obtaining PM2.5 data for the entirety of a research region underlies the study of the relationship between PM2.5 and human spatiotemporal activity. A professional sampler with a filter membrane is used to measure accurate values of PM2.5 at single points
[...] Read more.
Obtaining PM2.5 data for the entirety of a research region underlies the study of the relationship between PM2.5 and human spatiotemporal activity. A professional sampler with a filter membrane is used to measure accurate values of PM2.5 at single points in space. However, there are numerous PM2.5 sampling and monitoring facilities that rely on data from only representative points, and which cannot measure the data for the whole region of research interest. This provides the motivation for researching the methods of estimation of particulate matter in areas having fewer monitors at a special scale, an approach now attracting considerable academic interest. The aim of this study is to (1) reclassify and particularize the most frequently used approaches for estimating the PM2.5 concentrations covering an entire research region; (2) list improvements to and integrations of traditional methods and their applications; and (3) compare existing approaches to PM2.5 estimation on the basis of accuracy and applicability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spatial Analysis of Pollution and Risk in a Changing Climate)
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