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Special Issue "Assessment of Environmental Radioactivity and Radiation for Human Health Risk"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Shinji Tokonami

Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: health physics; radiation protection; environmental radioactivity; environmental radiation; naturally occurring radioactive material; emergency preparedness; external exposure; internal exposure; measurement data; methodology; monitoring; risk assessment; risk communication
Guest Editor
Prof. Ikuo Kashiwakura

Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Science, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: radiation biology; radiation damage; radiation effects; radiation immune; biodosimetry; radiation-protective agent; radiation response; radiation sensitivity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On 11 March 2011, unfortunately, a nuclear accident occurred in Fukushima, Japan, following a big earthquake. Thereafter, many people in the world have been concerned about the radiation risk. They still believe that even a small amount of radiation exposure will affect human health. In reality, however, there are many natural radionuclides in the environment, which emit a variety of radiations. Although it is well known that there is a positively linear relationship between acute radiation exposure and cancer risk in atomic bomb survivors, the risk of chronic radiation exposure due to natural radionuclides cannot be well explained to people who have lived in high-background radiation areas for many generations. Therefore, more studies in this research field are required to obtain new scientific findings. In order to promote further scientific activities, it will be the best for us to understand the current status of this field by summarizing what we have apprehended so far. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, titled “Assessment of Environmental Radioactivity and Radiation for Human Health Risk”, offers an opportunity to publish high-quality research papers. It welcomes studies involving measurement data, methodologies, radiation biology, and risk assessment related to radiation. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field.

Prof. Shinji Tokonami
Prof. Ikuo Kashiwakura
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environment
  • radioactivity
  • radiation
  • exposure
  • dosimetry
  • radiation biology
  • radiation effects
  • radiation response
  • risk

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Environmental Contamination and Estimated Radiation Exposure Dose Rates among Residents Immediately after Returning Home to Tomioka Town, Fukushima Prefecture
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1481; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091481
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 22 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1026 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
On 1 April 2017, six years have passed since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) accident, and the Japanese government declared that some residents who lived in Tomioka Town, Fukushima Prefecture could return to their homes. We evaluated environmental contamination and radiation [...] Read more.
On 1 April 2017, six years have passed since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) accident, and the Japanese government declared that some residents who lived in Tomioka Town, Fukushima Prefecture could return to their homes. We evaluated environmental contamination and radiation exposure dose rates due to artificial radionuclides in the livelihood zone of residents (living space such as housing sites), including a restricted area located within a 10-km radius from the FDNPS, immediately after residents had returned home in Tomioka town. In areas where the evacuation orders had been lifted, the median air dose rates were 0.20 μSv/h indoors and 0.26 μSv/h outdoors, and the radiation exposure dose rate was 1.6 mSv/y. By contrast, in the “difficult-to-return zone,” the median air dose rate was 2.3 μSv/h (20 mSv/y) outdoors. Moreover, the dose-forming artificial radionuclides (radiocesium) in the surface soil were 0.018 μSv/h (0.17 mSv/y) in the evacuation order-lifted areas and 0.73 μSv/h (6.4 mSv/y) in the difficult-to-return zone. These findings indicate that current concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples have been decreasing in the evacuation order-lifted areas of Tomioka town; however, a significant external exposure risk still exists in the difficult-to-return zone. The case of Tomioka town is expected to be the first reconstruction model including the difficult-to-return zone. Full article
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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