Special Issue "Health Behavior Clustering and Mental Health Outcomes in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ryan D. Burns
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Kinesiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Interests: academic performance; adolescents; children; cognitive development; health; longitudinal analysis; physical activity; sports
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wonwoo Byun
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Kinesiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Interests: epidemiology; preschool children; intervention; reliability; sedentary behavior; wearable technology; validity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During this uncertain time in world history, maintaining adequate mental health is important. Children, adolescents, and young adults are susceptible to anxiety, depression, loneliness, and low self-esteem that may affect their physical health and overall well-being. These burdens may transfer into the academic classroom and negatively affect academic performance. Health behaviors such as adequate physical activity, a healthy diet, and sufficient sleep quantity and quality have been shown to mitigate deteriorating mental health and improve well-being. Conversely, risk behaviors such as alcohol consumption, substance abuse, and smoking may exacerbate poor mental health. The clustering or combining of these health and risk behaviors may have additive effects on mental health outcomes. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, “Health Behavior Clustering and Mental Health Outcomes in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults”, offers an opportunity to publish high-quality research relating health and risk behavior clustering with mental health outcomes in young individuals. We are particularly interested in novel multi-behavioral interventions that target these outcomes within underserved populations. We also welcome observational studies examining longitudinal, moderated, and mediated relationships. Manuscripts will be rigorously peer-reviewed by experts in the field. Thank you for your consideration.

Dr. Ryan D. Burns
Dr. Wonwoo Byun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • cognition
  • diet
  • mental health
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behavior
  • sleep
  • smoking
  • social support
  • well-being

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Movement Behaviors and Perceived Loneliness and Sadness within Alaskan Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6866; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186866 - 20 Sep 2020
Abstract
Physical activity, screen use, and sleep are behaviors that integrate across the whole day. However, the accumulative influence of meeting recommendations for these 24-h movement behaviors on the mental health of Alaskan adolescents has not been examined. The purpose of this study was [...] Read more.
Physical activity, screen use, and sleep are behaviors that integrate across the whole day. However, the accumulative influence of meeting recommendations for these 24-h movement behaviors on the mental health of Alaskan adolescents has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between movement behaviors, loneliness, and sadness within Alaskan adolescents. Data were obtained from the 2019 Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). The number of adolescents participating in the 2019 Alaska YRBS was 1897. Associations between meeting recommendations for movement behaviors with loneliness and sadness were examined using weighted logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). Approximately 5.0% of the sample met recommendations for all three movement behaviors. Meeting 2 or 3 movement behavior recommendations was associated with lower odds of loneliness (odds ratio (OR) range = 0.23 to 0.44, p < 0.01). Additionally, meeting 1 to 3 movement behavior recommendations was associated with lower odds of sadness (OR range = 0.29 to 0.52, p < 0.05). Joint association analyses determined that these relationships were primarily driven by meeting the sleep recommendation for loneliness and meeting the screen use recommendation for sadness. The results support use of multiple movement-based behavior programming to attenuate feelings of loneliness and sadness within Alaskan adolescents. Full article
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