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Article

Gender Differences in Lifestyle and Mental Health among Senior High School Students in South Korea

1
Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju 61452, Korea
2
College of Nursing, Gachon University, Incheon 21936, Korea
3
College of Nursing, Kosin University, Busan 49267, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ryan D. Burns and Wonwoo Byun
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10746; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010746
Received: 16 August 2021 / Revised: 30 September 2021 / Accepted: 11 October 2021 / Published: 13 October 2021
Gender differences in health outcomes have long been a concern worldwide. We investigated the gender differences in the lifestyle and mental health status of senior students in general high schools who were preparing for college entrance exams. This secondary analysis was based on data from the 14th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey (2018). The data of 8476 students in the third year (12th grade) of general high school, among a total of 60,040 middle and high school students nationwide, were analyzed. Mean and standard error (SE) and weighted percentage data were obtained, and the Rao–Scott χ2 test was performed. Boys reported more risky behaviors related to drinking and smoking, while girls had more negative perceptions of their bodies and overall health. In addition, girls showed unhealthier lifestyle-related behaviors (breakfast, physical activity, weight control) and greater vulnerability to poor mental health, including lower sleep satisfaction, stress, depression, and suicidal thoughts. Our results suggest that education and health institutions should consider the needs of each gender separately. A gender-specific approach to maintaining healthy lifestyles and good health status among senior high school students is highly recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: gender differences; adolescence; lifestyle; mental health gender differences; adolescence; lifestyle; mental health
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.; Park, K.-H.; Park, S. Gender Differences in Lifestyle and Mental Health among Senior High School Students in South Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10746. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010746

AMA Style

Kim H, Park K-H, Park S. Gender Differences in Lifestyle and Mental Health among Senior High School Students in South Korea. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(20):10746. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010746

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Hyunlye, Kwang-Hi Park, and Suin Park. 2021. "Gender Differences in Lifestyle and Mental Health among Senior High School Students in South Korea" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 20: 10746. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010746

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