Special Issue "Wearable Technology-Based Physical Activity Measurement and Intervention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wonwoo Byun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health-Kinesiology-Recreation, The University of Utah, USA
Interests: Physical Activity; Sedentary behavior; Exercise; Behavioral epidemiology; Community-based intervention; Pediatric Obesity; Children and youth

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Despite the well-established health benefits of regular physical activity, only a small proportion of population in developed and/or developing countries is physically active enough to achieve the associated health benefits, placing physical inactivity as one of the major public health concerns worldwide. Researchers, clinicians, and practitioners are increasingly adopting wearable technologies in various settings to measure and/or promote physical activity in diverse populations (e.g., children and youth, patients, pregnant women, older adults); however, the development of effective strategies for improving physical activity particularly using novel wearable technologies that also provide accurate and consistent monitoring of physical activity is understudied. In fact, available data are limited and sometimes inconsistent, leaving a gap in understanding the utilization of innovative and affordable wearable technologies in physical activity interventions and the effects of those interventions in in various population groups. As part of continuous efforts to extend our desire for developing cost-effective and sustainable interventions to improve physical activity and human health, this Special Issue calls for research studies on a broad range of topics in wearable technology-based physical activity management and intervention to promote human health across varying health domains and populations.

We invite investigators to submit original as well as review articles addressing topics on a broad range in wearable technology-based physical activity management and intervention to promote human health across varying health. Potential topics covered in this Special Issue can be found below.

  • Studies examining the effects of (wearable) technology-based interventions to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behavior in diverse populations (e.g., children and youth, patients, pregnant women, older adults);
  • Studies identifying processes of implementing technology-based physical activity interventions;
  • Observational or experimental studies understanding the role of technology, including games and social media, in promoting physical activity;
  • Studies examining the optimal approaches to promote physical activity using wearable technologies;
  • Utilizing wearable and other technologies to describe the levels and/or trends of physical activity/sedentary behavior across diverse populations;
  • Methodological studies examining the validity and/or reliability of wearable technology-based devices for assessing physical activity and sedentary behavior.

Prof. Dr. Wonwoo Byun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Agreement between the Apple Series 1, LifeTrak Core C200, and Fitbit Charge HR with Indirect Calorimetry for Assessing Treadmill Energy Expenditure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3812; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203812 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine agreement in energy expenditure between the Apple Series 1 Watch, LifeTrak Core C200, and Fitbit Charge HR with indirect calorimetry during various treadmill speeds in young adults. Participants were a sample of college-aged students (mean [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine agreement in energy expenditure between the Apple Series 1 Watch, LifeTrak Core C200, and Fitbit Charge HR with indirect calorimetry during various treadmill speeds in young adults. Participants were a sample of college-aged students (mean age = 20.1 (1.7) years; 13 females, 17 males). Participants completed six structured 10-minute exercise sessions on a treadmill with speeds ranging from 53.6 m·min−1 to 187.7 m·min−1. Indirect calorimetry was used as the criterion. Participants wore the Apple Watch, LifeTrak, and Fitbit activity monitors on their wrists. Group-level agreement was examined using equivalence testing, relative agreement was examined using Spearman’s rho, and individual-level agreement was examined using Mean Absolute Percent Error (MAPE) and Bland-Altman Plots. Activity monitor agreement with indirect calorimetry was supported using the Apple Watch at 160.9 m·min−1 (Mean difference = −2.7 kcals, 90% C.I.: −8.3 kcals, 2.8 kcals; MAPE = 11.9%; rs = 0.64) and 187.7 m·min−1 (Mean difference = 3.7 kcals, 90% C.I.: −2.2 kcals, 9.7 kcals; MAPE = 10.7%; rs = 0.72) and the Fitbit at 187.7 m·min−1 (Mean difference = −0.2 kcals, 90% C.I.: −8.8 kcals, 8.5 kcals; MAPE = 20.1%; rs = 0.44). No evidence for statistical equivalence was seen for the LifeTrak at any speed. Bland-Altman Plot Limits of Agreement were narrower for the Apple Series 1 Watch compared to other monitors, especially at slower treadmill speeds. The results support the utility of the Apple Series 1 Watch and Fitbit Charge HR for assessing energy expenditure during specific treadmill running speeds in young adults. Full article
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