Special Issue "The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Alan E. Stewart
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Counseling and Human Development Services & Department of Geography – Atmospheric Science Program, The University of Georgia, Athens, United States
Interests: psychology of weather and climate; weather salience; weather-related risk-taking; weather perception; weather-as-events; global climate change; weather and emotional processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

People are increasingly experiencing severe or extreme weather events that can be attributed to global climate change. Similarly, the cumulative effects of altered temperature and precipitation regimes can create personal, social, or economic impacts that develop and evolve over time. What are the psychological impacts of such single and multiple events as a result of climate change? Here, psychological impacts encompass not only changes in the emotional responses of individuals, but changes in perceptual processes, thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors in response to experienced or anticipated climate change. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health invites the submission of quantitative or qualitative empirical research that addresses this question and in so doing reveals something novel about peoples’ psychological relationships with weather or climate. Although research on global climate change is integrative and multidisciplinary, submissions for this special edition should be primarily psychological in nature and possess implications for mental and/or physical health. Individual people or families should be the units of analysis used in submitted research. Some illustrative topics for this Special Issue are:

  • Changes in environmentally sustainable behavior following weather- or climate-related experiences;
  • Changes in peoples’ relationships with place(s) as the climate of that place changes;
  • Changes in perception, thinking, or reasoning about climate change following the experience of a severe or extreme weather event;
  • Studies of individual traits or characteristics that may be helpful in adjusting to the impacts of climate change.

Prof. Alan E. Stewart
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • affect/emotion
  • climate change
  • human cognition
  • individual differences
  • meaning-making
  • personality traits
  • psychological adaptation
  • weather risk-taking
  • weather salience

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Investigating Connections between Need for Cognitive Closure and Climate Change Concern in College Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5619; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155619 - 04 Aug 2020
Abstract
Understanding how people’s worldviews and individual personality differences affect their thinking about anthropogenic climate change is critical to communication efforts regarding this issue. This study surveyed University of Georgia students to investigate the role that need for cognitive closure plays in level of [...] Read more.
Understanding how people’s worldviews and individual personality differences affect their thinking about anthropogenic climate change is critical to communication efforts regarding this issue. This study surveyed University of Georgia students to investigate the role that need for cognitive closure plays in level of climate change worry. The relationship between these two was found to involve suppression—a subset of mediation—by the social dimension of political conservatism. Political conservatism was also found to play a mediating role in the relationship between need for cognitive closure and support for governmental and personal climate solutions. However, social conservatism played this mediator role in women, and functioned as a suppressor for men. These findings help inform audience segmentation and creation of climate-related messages based on audience worldview and personality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change)
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Open AccessArticle
#Climatechange vs. #Globalwarming: Characterizing Two Competing Climate Discourses on Twitter with Semantic Network and Temporal Analyses
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1062; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031062 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Distinct perceptions of the global climate is one of the factors preventing society from achieving consensus or taking collaborative actions on this issue. The public has not even reached an agreement on the naming of the global concern, showing preference for either “climate [...] Read more.
Distinct perceptions of the global climate is one of the factors preventing society from achieving consensus or taking collaborative actions on this issue. The public has not even reached an agreement on the naming of the global concern, showing preference for either “climate change” or “global warming”, and few previous studies have addressed these two competing discourses resulting from distinct climate concerns by differently linking numerous climate concepts. Based on the 6,662,478 tweets containing #climatechange or #globalwarming generated between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2018, we constructed the semantic networks of the two discourses and examined their evolution over the decade. The findings indicate that climate change demonstrated a more scientific perspective and showed an attempt to condense climate discussions rather than diffuse the topic by frequently addressing sub-topics simultaneously. Global warming triggered more political responses and showed a greater connection with phenomena. Temporal analysis suggests that traditional political discussions were gradually fading in both discourses but more recently started to revive in the form of discourse alliance in the climate change discourse. The associations between global warming and weather abnormalitiessuddenly strengthened around 2012. Climate change is becoming more dominant than global warming in public discussions. Although two discourses have shown more similarities in the rank order of important climate concepts, apparent disagreements continue about how these concepts are associated. These findings lay the groundwork for researchers and communicators to narrow the discrepancy between diverse climate perceptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change)
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