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Article

Psychometric Properties of the Climate Change Worry Scale

College of Education, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020494
Received: 22 October 2020 / Revised: 23 December 2020 / Accepted: 30 December 2020 / Published: 9 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change)
Climate change worry involves primarily verbal-linguistic thoughts about the changes that may occur in the climate system and the possible effects of these changes. Such worry is one of several possible psychological responses (e.g., fear, anxiety, depression, and trauma) to climate change. Within this article, the psychometric development of the ten-item Climate Change Worry Scale (CCWS) is detailed in three studies. The scale was developed to assess proximal worry about climate change rather than social or global impacts. Study 1 provided evidence that the CCWS items were internally consistent, constituted a single factor, and that the facture structure of the items was invariant for men and women. The results from Study 1 also indicated a good fit with a Rasch model of the items. Study 2 affirmed the internal consistency of the CCWS items and indicated that peoples’ responses to the measure were temporally stable over a two-week test–retest interval (r = 0.91). Study 3 provided support for the convergent and divergent validity of the CCWS through its pattern of correlations with several established clinical and weather-related measures. The limitations of the studies and the possible uses of the CCWS were discussed. The current work represents a starting point. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; worry; climate; psychometrics; psychological measurement; weather climate change; worry; climate; psychometrics; psychological measurement; weather
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stewart, A.E. Psychometric Properties of the Climate Change Worry Scale. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020494

AMA Style

Stewart AE. Psychometric Properties of the Climate Change Worry Scale. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):494. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020494

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stewart, Alan E. 2021. "Psychometric Properties of the Climate Change Worry Scale" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 2: 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020494

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