ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Physical Activity and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2023 | Viewed by 23363

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jack Parker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Human Science Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby DE22 1GB, UK
Interests: physical therapy; rehabilitation; technology; neurodisabilities
Dr. Mark Faghy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Human Science Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby DE22 1GB, UK
Interests: physical activity; health; recovery; rehabilitation; quality of life

Special Issue Information

The WHO global action plan on physical activity 2018–2030 aims for a more active world to improve physical and environmental sustainability. Physical activity and rehabilitation are essential for physical and mental wellbeing and the prevention of chronic diseases, leading to premature mortality. Rehabilitation is an essential part of universal health coverage along with the promotion of good health, prevention of disease, treatment, and palliative care. Rehabilitation helps a child, adult or older person to be as independent as possible in everyday activities and enables participation in education, work, recreation, and meaningful life roles, such as taking care of the family. This Special Edition welcomes submissions that report the design, methodological approach, implementation, and impact of physical activity and rehabilitation interventions across all age ranges. We encourage original studies investigating innovative physical activity and rehabilitation programs, as well as studies that explore key considerations when designing and delivering interventions. These may include the use of technology and co-design as well as innovative methodologies leading to lasting change and impact. We hope you will consider submitting to this Special Issue, and we look forward to hearing from you. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with Jack Parker or Mark Faghy if you have queries.

Dr. Jack Parker
Dr. Mark Faghy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • rehabilitation
  • innovation
  • technology
  • co-design

Published Papers (18 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
“We Just Don’t Know Where They Are”: The Geographical Distribution of Exercise Classes for Older People, Including Those Living with Dementia in the East Midlands
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032142 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 442
Abstract
Older people living with dementia are advised to exercise to remain independent. Although several exercise classes for older people take place across the UK, there is limited information about the geographical distribution of these classes. This study identified the location and explored the [...] Read more.
Older people living with dementia are advised to exercise to remain independent. Although several exercise classes for older people take place across the UK, there is limited information about the geographical distribution of these classes. This study identified the location and explored the population characteristics of the classes in a UK region, to aid improved access to exercise. Using a geographical information system, data were collected on population characteristics, including size and age, socio-economic status, and rurality of the exercise classes in one area of the UK (East Midlands, population 5 million). The relationship between data sets was explored and a visual representation of these patterns was provided. A systematic internet search identified 520 exercise classes, evenly spread across the region and areas of socio-economic deprivation: 471 (90%) were in urban areas; 428 (80%) were in areas where less than 20% of the population was over 65 years of age; and 13 (2%) stated that they were suitable for people with dementia. People living with dementia are less likely than older people without dementia to have access to exercise classes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Article
Post-Stroke Experiences and Rehabilitation Needs of Community-Dwelling Chinese Stroke Survivors: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16345; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316345 - 06 Dec 2022
Viewed by 615
Abstract
Stroke survivors encounter significant limitations in daily life activities and face increased risk of health complications such as stroke recurrence. Considering the escalating demand for personalised community rehabilitation services, this qualitative study was conducted to understand the current recovery experiences, needs, and expectations [...] Read more.
Stroke survivors encounter significant limitations in daily life activities and face increased risk of health complications such as stroke recurrence. Considering the escalating demand for personalised community rehabilitation services, this qualitative study was conducted to understand the current recovery experiences, needs, and expectations of community-dwelling stroke survivors. Fifty stroke survivors were recruited from two tertiary teaching hospitals and community centres in two provinces in mainland China. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, and participants were asked to describe their experiences of stroke, current lifestyles, exercise habits, and rehabilitation needs and expectations. Resulting data were thematically analysed. The majority of participants were first-time stroke survivors (80%) and lived with their family or caregivers (92%). Four main themes and twelve sub-themes emerged from the data: (1) shifts in social life, (2) shaken sense of self and perceived helplessness, (3) complex rehabilitation needs, and (4) perceptions and patterns of physical activity. Findings suggest that though survivors recognised their need for further rehabilitation, their demands remained unmet due to a combination of personal and external factors such as limited mobility and the absence of supportive companions and accessible facilities. The enhancement and diversification of home rehabilitation strategies are therefore necessary to make community rehabilitation more accessible and equitable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Article
Comparative Perceptual, Affective, and Cardiovascular Responses between Resistance Exercise with and without Blood Flow Restriction in Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16000; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316000 - 30 Nov 2022
Viewed by 509
Abstract
Older adults and patients with chronic disease presenting with muscle weakness or musculoskeletal disorders may benefit from low-load resistance exercise (LLRE) with blood flow restriction (BFR). LLRE-BFR has been shown to increase muscle size, strength, and endurance comparable to traditional resistance exercise but [...] Read more.
Older adults and patients with chronic disease presenting with muscle weakness or musculoskeletal disorders may benefit from low-load resistance exercise (LLRE) with blood flow restriction (BFR). LLRE-BFR has been shown to increase muscle size, strength, and endurance comparable to traditional resistance exercise but without the use of heavy loads. However, potential negative effects from LLRE-BFR present as a barrier to participation and limit its wider use. This study examined the perceptual, affective, and cardiovascular responses to a bout of LLRE-BFR and compared the responses to LLRE and moderate-load resistance exercise (MLRE). Twenty older adults (64.3 ± 4.2 years) performed LLRE-BFR, LLRE and MLRE consisting of 4 sets of leg press and knee extension, in a randomised crossover design. LLRE-BFR was more demanding than LLRE and MLRE through increased pain (p ≤ 0.024, d = 0.8–1.4) and reduced affect (p ≤ 0.048, d = −0.5–−0.9). Despite this, LLRE-BFR was enjoyed and promoted a positive affective response (p ≤ 0.035, d = 0.5–0.9) following exercise comparable to MLRE. This study supports the use of LLRE-BFR for older adults and encourages future research to examine the safety, acceptability, and efficacy of LLRE-BFR in patients with chronic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Clinically Meaningful Change in 6 Minute Walking Test and the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test following Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14270; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114270 - 01 Nov 2022
Viewed by 862
Abstract
The 6-min walk test (6MWT) and incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) are widely used measures of exercise tolerance, which depict favorable performance characteristics in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary conditions. Both tests are valid and reliable method of assessing functional ability in [...] Read more.
The 6-min walk test (6MWT) and incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) are widely used measures of exercise tolerance, which depict favorable performance characteristics in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary conditions. Both tests are valid and reliable method of assessing functional ability in cardiac rehabilitation population. Several studies have calculated the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of these exercise tests in different populations. The current study aims to estimate MCID of 6MWT and ISWT in patients after Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In this descriptive observational study, nonprobability purposive sampling technique was used to assess 89 post CABG patients. The participants performed the 6MWT and ISWT along with vital monitoring on third, fifth and seventh post operative days. The data was with calculation of 6MWT and ISWT MCID through distribution and anchor-based methods. Results showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) in 6MWT as well as in ISWT after seven days of in-patient cardiac rehabilitation. The minimal detectable difference of 6MWT determined by the distribution-based method was 36.11 whereas MCID calculated by Anchor based method was 195 m. The minimal detectable difference of ISWT determined by the distribution-based method was 9.94 whereas MCID calculated by Anchor based method was 42.5 m. In conclusion our results will assist the future researchers and clinicians to interpret clinical trials as well as to observe the clinical course of post operative cardiac patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Influence of Easing COVID-19 Restrictions on the Physical Activity Intentions and Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity in UK Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12521; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912521 - 30 Sep 2022
Viewed by 623
Abstract
COVID-19 has had profound effects on physical activity behaviours of older adults, and understanding this impact is essential to driving public health policies to promote healthy ageing. The present study aimed to determine; (1) intended physical activity behaviours of older adults following the [...] Read more.
COVID-19 has had profound effects on physical activity behaviours of older adults, and understanding this impact is essential to driving public health policies to promote healthy ageing. The present study aimed to determine; (1) intended physical activity behaviours of older adults following the easing of UK COVID-19 restrictions; (2) the relationship between self-reported physical activity and intended physical activity behaviour; (3) perceived barriers to achieving the intended physical activity goal. Ninety-six participants (74.8 ± 4.4 years; 52 female) from a longitudinal study examining the impact of COVID-19 on physical activity were recruited. Participants outlined their future physical activity intentions and completed the COM-B Self Evaluation Questionnaire. Participants were split into groups based on their intention to ‘Maintain’ (n = 29), ‘Increase’ (n = 38) or ‘Return’ (n = 29) to pre-COVID-19 physical activity. Self-reported physical activity undulated over the pandemic but was mostly equivalent between groups. Intended physical activity behaviour was independent of self-report physical activity. Capability and motivation factors were the most frequently cited barriers to the intended physical activity behaviour, with a greater number of capability barriers in the ‘Return’ group. Such barriers should be considered in the COVID-19 recovery public health physical activity strategy for promoting healthy ageing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Thermal Influence of an Electromagnetic Field with a Radio Frequency Depending on the Type of Electrode Used
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11378; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811378 - 09 Sep 2022
Viewed by 695
Abstract
Diathermy is a method used in physiotherapy based on obtaining an increase in temperature by supplying energy from the electromagnetic field to the tissues. The aim of this retrospective work, based on the data included in a medical documentation, was to assess the [...] Read more.
Diathermy is a method used in physiotherapy based on obtaining an increase in temperature by supplying energy from the electromagnetic field to the tissues. The aim of this retrospective work, based on the data included in a medical documentation, was to assess the dynamics of temperature changes on the body surface after the application of a high-frequency electromagnetic field depending on the type of electrode used. In order to generate a radio frequency electromagnetic field, an INDIBA ACTIV® CT9 was used. In order to measure the temperature, an HT-17 thermovision camera was used, enabling measurements within the range of −20 to 300 °C, with an accuracy of ±2% or 2 °C. The participants consisted of 30 healthy subjects (15 women and 15 men) who were physiotherapy students in the Faculty of Public Health in the Silesian Medical University in Katowice, Poland; they were divided into two comparative groups (A and B). It was found that the differences between the groups were not significant in the measurements carried out before using the electrode (p = 0.84; Mann–Whitney U test). On the other hand, at 0, 5 and 15 min, statistically significant differences were noted in the tissue temperature between the groups, depending on the electrode used (p = 0.00; Mann–Whitney U test). Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that with the extension of the observation time, the tissue temperature increased (for Group A, Me 30.40 °C vs. 34.90 °C; for Group B, Me 30.70 °C vs. 35.20 °C). Our study confirmed that the use of both a capacitive and resistive electrode during treatment with the use of a high-frequency electromagnetic field statistically significantly increased the surface temperature of the area to which the therapy was applied. The results of the study can be used in clinical practice by physiotherapists to optimize the conditions of therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Acute Effects of Facial Coverings on Anaerobic Exercise Performance in College-Aged Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710500 - 23 Aug 2022
Viewed by 751
Abstract
The use of facial coverings has been amplified during the COVID-19 pandemic as a means to minimize the spread of disease. However, facial coverings may impede ventilation during high-intensity activity, leading to a reduction in cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Thus, the purpose of this [...] Read more.
The use of facial coverings has been amplified during the COVID-19 pandemic as a means to minimize the spread of disease. However, facial coverings may impede ventilation during high-intensity activity, leading to a reduction in cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute impact of different facial coverings on exercise performance in college-aged individuals during a 300-yard shuttle. It was hypothesized that the lowest heart rate (HR), completion time (CT), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) would occur with no mask. Furthermore, it was hypothesized the SHEMA97 mask would have lower HR, CT, and RPE compared to surgical and fabric masks. Results showed the use of the fabric mask resulted in significantly higher HR compared to no mask (p = 0.006). The SHEMA97 mask resulted in faster CT and lower RPE compared to both the fabric and surgical masks (p < 0.001). All mask conditions yielded significantly higher levels of perceived discomfort than wearing no mask (p < 0.05). While the use of facial coverings can help prevent the spread of disease, their use during exercise may pose limitations to performance; however, the ability of the SHEMA97 to provide minimal changes to CT and RPE provides a promising option. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Change in Bone Mineral Density in Stroke Patients with Osteoporosis or Osteopenia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 8954; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19158954 - 23 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1169
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the correlation between changes in bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) and osteoporosis-related factors in stroke patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia, and we suggest the need for active rehabilitation treatment. This study [...] Read more.
We aimed to investigate the correlation between changes in bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) and osteoporosis-related factors in stroke patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia, and we suggest the need for active rehabilitation treatment. This study included 63 osteoporosis and 34 osteopenia patients who underwent a BMD test following primary stroke onset. The osteoporosis group was followed up with a BMD test after 12 months of bisphosphonate treatment, and the osteopenia group was followed up without medication. The correlation between BMD changes and functional factors was analyzed, biochemical markers were measured, and hematology tests were performed. In the osteoporosis group, a significant increase was observed in LS BMD (p < 0.05), and in the osteopenia group, there was a significant decrease in FN BMD (p < 0.05). The group with a functional ambulatory category of 1 or more showed a significant improvement in BMD (p < 0.05). Comparative analysis was performed on various indicators, but no significant correlation was found between any variable. In stroke patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia, early appropriate drug treatment is important to prevent bone loss and reduce the risk of fractures, and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, such as appropriate education and training to prevent falls, is essential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Role of Physical Activity in Cancer Recovery: An Exercise Practitioner’s Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063600 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1420
Abstract
Less than 20% of cancer patients meet the recommended physical activity (PA) guidelines, partially due to poor knowledge and enforcement/encouragement amongst health-care professionals (HCPs). The primary aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of exercise practitioners on the role of PA [...] Read more.
Less than 20% of cancer patients meet the recommended physical activity (PA) guidelines, partially due to poor knowledge and enforcement/encouragement amongst health-care professionals (HCPs). The primary aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of exercise practitioners on the role of PA and the physiological and psychological benefits to recovering cancer patients; the secondary aim was to understand the barriers and facilitators of promoting PA to cancer survivors. The third aim was to, seek the perspectives on the effectiveness of referral systems between the hospitals and PA structures. A purposive sample of five exercise practitioners’ (four male and one female) with experience with cancer patients participated in a semi-structured interview (45–60 min). Interviews addressed five key topics: intervention procedures, patient well-being, patient education on PA, effectiveness of referrals from hospitals, and post-intervention PA. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed via thematic analysis. The participants believed that recovering cancer patients possess a knowledge of the physiological benefits of PA, yet psychological understanding remains unknown. Social environments are key to participation in PA and most HCPs lacked knowledge/awareness of the benefits of engaging in PA. There is a need to improve HCPs knowledge of the benefits of PA, whilst providing standardised training on how PA can improve cancer patients’ outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Article
Barriers and Facilitators to Physical Activity and FMS in Children Living in Deprived Areas in the UK: Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1717; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031717 - 02 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2472
Abstract
Using the socio-ecological model, this qualitative study aimed to explore teachers’ perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) and physical activity engagement in children living in deprived areas in the UK. A purposive sample of 14 primary school teachers [...] Read more.
Using the socio-ecological model, this qualitative study aimed to explore teachers’ perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) and physical activity engagement in children living in deprived areas in the UK. A purposive sample of 14 primary school teachers participated in semi-structured focus groups drawn from schools situated in lower SES wards and ethnically diverse areas in Central England. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified multiple and interrelated factors across all levels of the socio-ecological model for barriers to FMS and PA (i.e., intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational, community and policy). Facilitators at three levels of influence were found (i.e., intrapersonal, interpersonal and organisational). We conclude, barriers and enablers to the PA and FMS in children from ethnically diverse backgrounds living in deprived areas are multifactorial and interrelated. At a school level, initiatives to increase PA and develop the FMS needed to be active are likely to be ineffective unless the barriers are addressed at all levels and considered more holistically with their complexity. Multi-disciplinary solutions are needed across sectors given the range of complex and interrelated factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Leg Fidgeting Improves Executive Function following Prolonged Sitting with a Typical Western Meal: A Randomized, Controlled Cross-Over Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031357 - 26 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2018
Abstract
Prolonged uninterrupted sitting and a typical Western meal, high in fat and refined sugar, can additively impair cognitive and cerebrovascular functions. However, it is unknown whether interrupting these behaviours, with a simple desk-based activity, can attenuate the impairment. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Prolonged uninterrupted sitting and a typical Western meal, high in fat and refined sugar, can additively impair cognitive and cerebrovascular functions. However, it is unknown whether interrupting these behaviours, with a simple desk-based activity, can attenuate the impairment. The aim of this study was to determine whether regular leg fidgeting can off-set the detrimental effects of prolonged sitting following the consumption of a typical Western meal, on executive and cerebrovascular function. Using a randomized cross-over design, 13 healthy males consumed a Western meal and completed 180-min of prolonged sitting with leg fidgeting of 1 min on/4 min off (intervention [INT]) and without (control [CON]). Cognitive function was assessed pre and post sitting using the Trail Maker Test (TMT) parts A and B. Common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow, as an index of brain flow, was measured pre and post, and cerebral (FP1) perfusion was measured continuously. For TMT B the CON trial significantly increased (worsened) completion time (mean difference [MD] = 5.2 s, d = 0.38), the number of errors (MD = 3.33, d = 0.68) and cognitive fatigue (MD = 0.73, d = 0.92). Compared to CON, the INT trial significantly improved completion time (MD = 2.3 s, d = 0.97), and prevented declines in cognitive fatigue and a reduction in the number of errors. No significant changes in cerebral perfusion or CCA blood flow were found. Leg fidgeting for 1-min on/4-min off following a meal high in fats and refined sugars attenuated the impairment in executive function. This attenuation in executive function may not be caused by alterations in CCA blood flow or cerebral perfusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Article
The Effects of Electrical Stimulation Program on Navicular Height, Balance, and Fear of Falling in Community-Dwelling Elderly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9351; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179351 - 04 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1664
Abstract
Introduction: Intrinsic foot muscle weakness is a crucial cause of balance deficit in the elderly, which leads to a limited range of motion from the fear of falling and subsequently decreases the quality of life. Muscle strengthening via transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) is [...] Read more.
Introduction: Intrinsic foot muscle weakness is a crucial cause of balance deficit in the elderly, which leads to a limited range of motion from the fear of falling and subsequently decreases the quality of life. Muscle strengthening via transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) is an effective intervention; however, its effects on elderly people have rarely been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TENS on navicular height, balance, and fear of falling. Method: In this study, forty-eight participants aged 65–75 years were included and were randomly divided into two groups: the TENS and control groups. Before and after 4 weeks of training, navicular height, balance, and fear of falling were measured. Result: After 4 weeks of training, navicular height significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05); however, the increase was higher in the TENS group (p = 0.035). The TENS group had a better improvement in balance in all four directions—front, back, left, and right (p < 0.05). However, postural balance improvements in the control group were observed in three directions only—front, back, and left (p < 0.05)—without any significant difference between the two groups. Furthermore, the TENS group decreased the scale of fear of falling after 4 weeks of training (p = 0.039). Conclusion: In summary, the results of this study can be used as part of the muscle strengthening via ES for decreasing the risk of falls or fear of falling in the elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Physiotherapy Rehabilitation in Subjects Diagnosed with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Does Not Normalize Periscapular and Rotator Cuff Muscle Onset Time of Activation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 8952; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18178952 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2227
Abstract
Clinicians suggest that rehabilitation of Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) should target improving movement patterns to ensure better clinical outcomes. Understanding changes in onset time of activation patterns and associated changes in clinical outcomes could improve our understanding of rehabilitation strategies. In this prospective [...] Read more.
Clinicians suggest that rehabilitation of Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) should target improving movement patterns to ensure better clinical outcomes. Understanding changes in onset time of activation patterns and associated changes in clinical outcomes could improve our understanding of rehabilitation strategies. In this prospective longitudinal study, we examined neuromuscular firing patterns and clinical features before and after a standardized physiotherapy program in subjects diagnosed with SIS. Electromyography (EMG) recordings of eleven shoulder muscles were taken at the initial and discharge consultation in 34 male volunteers diagnosed with SIS. EMG recording was performed during flexion, scaption, and abduction at slow, medium, and fast speeds with a loaded (3 kg) and unloaded arm, as well as rotational motion, rotational strength, pain, and shoulder function. Completion of standardized shoulder physiotherapy program for SIS resulted in improvements in clinical outcomes. Resulted showed inconsistent differences of onset time of activation mainly in some of the periscapular muscles for all movements. No differences were seen on the EMG recordings for rotator cuff muscles. Differences in range of motion, strength and function were shown. Despite some changes in onset time of activation, this study was not able to demonstrate consistent changes of onset time of activation of the periscapular and rotator cuff muscles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
A Call to Clarify the Intensity and Classification of Standing Behavior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8460; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168460 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1193
Abstract
Public health guidelines for physical activity now include recommendations to break up prolonged sitting with light-intensity activities. Concurrently, interventions to increase standing have emerged, especially within the workplace in the form of sit–stand or standing workstations. Moreover, in short-duration studies, breaking up prolonged [...] Read more.
Public health guidelines for physical activity now include recommendations to break up prolonged sitting with light-intensity activities. Concurrently, interventions to increase standing have emerged, especially within the workplace in the form of sit–stand or standing workstations. Moreover, in short-duration studies, breaking up prolonged sitting with standing has been associated improved cardiometabolic outcomes. Publicly available estimates of the intensity of standing range from 1.5 to 2.3 metabolic equivalents (METs), neatly classifying standing as a light-intensity activity (>1.5 to <3.0 METs). Further delineation between ‘active’ and ‘passive’ standing has been proposed, with corresponding METs of >2.0 METs and ≤2.0 METs, respectively. However, this study reviews data suggesting that some standing (e.g., while performing deskwork) is substantially below the minimum light intensity activity threshold of 1.5 METs. These data bring into question whether standing should be universally classified as a light-intensity behavior. The objectives of this study are to (i) highlight discrepancies in classifying standing behavior in the human movement spectrum continuum, and (ii) to propose a realignment of the ‘active’ vs. ‘passive’ standing threshold to match the light intensity threshold to help provide a clearer research framework and subsequent public health messaging for the expected health benefits from standing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Designing Innovative Assistive Technology Devices for Tourism
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14186; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114186 - 30 Oct 2022
Viewed by 657
Abstract
Active tourism improves human health and well-being regardless of age or disabilities. The paper analyses and describes current issues concerning the tourism of people with disabilities. The starting point is the currently insufficient availability of tourist offers for individuals with considerable motor dysfunctions. [...] Read more.
Active tourism improves human health and well-being regardless of age or disabilities. The paper analyses and describes current issues concerning the tourism of people with disabilities. The starting point is the currently insufficient availability of tourist offers for individuals with considerable motor dysfunctions. One of the causes for these limitations stems from deficiencies in transport means for people with disabilities. It was found that for a disabled passenger using public transport, it is crucial to consider its accessibility in the context of the entire transport system. Another cause is the limited popularity of innovative, atypical assistive equipment for people with disabilities. Those insights point out that novel assistive technologies need to be developed, as it is necessary to more effectively support the activity of people with disabilities in all areas of life, including tourism, as this enhances their social rehabilitation. This paper indicates the needs and describes and analyses examples of own original, innovative devices supporting the areas mentioned above of activity for people with disabilities. These analyses resulted in developing an algorithm to design innovative equipment, considerably expanding the tourism potential of people with motor disabilities. This design process focuses on the needs of people with disabilities and facilitates the development of novel classes of assistive technologies, thus promoting new areas of activity for all. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Associations of Sedentary Time with Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8508; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168508 - 12 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1869
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate if sedentary time (ST) is associated with heart rate (HR) and variability (HRV) in adults. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed and Google Scholar through June 2020. Inclusion criteria were observational design, humans, adults, English language, ST as the exposure, resting [...] Read more.
Purpose: To evaluate if sedentary time (ST) is associated with heart rate (HR) and variability (HRV) in adults. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed and Google Scholar through June 2020. Inclusion criteria were observational design, humans, adults, English language, ST as the exposure, resting HR/HRV as the outcome, and (meta-analysis only) availability of the quantitative association with variability. After qualitative synthesis, meta-analysis used inverse variance heterogeneity models to estimate pooled associations. Results: Thirteen and eight articles met the criteria for the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. All studies were cross-sectional and few used gold standard ST or HRV assessment methodology. The qualitative synthesis suggested no associations between ST and HR/HRV. The meta-analysis found a significant association between ST and HR (β = 0.24 bpm per hour ST; CI: 0.10, 0.37) that was stronger in males (β = 0.36 bpm per hour ST; CI: 0.19, 0.53). Pooled associations between ST and HRV indices were non-significant (p > 0.05). Substantial heterogeneity was detected. Conclusions: The limited available evidence suggests an unfavorable but not clinically meaningful association between ST and HR, but no association with HRV. Future longitudinal studies assessing ST with thigh-based monitoring and HRV with electrocardiogram are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Protocol
Identifying the Optimal Exercise Prescription for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12317; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912317 - 28 Sep 2022
Viewed by 835
Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in these patients, and yet clinicians are often challenged to prescribe the most effective type of exercise training. [...] Read more.
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in these patients, and yet clinicians are often challenged to prescribe the most effective type of exercise training. Therefore, this systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) aims to formally quantify the optimal dose of exercise training interventions to improve exercise capacity and quality of life by undertaking direct and indirect pooled comparisons of randomized controlled trials. A detailed search will be conducted on PubMed/MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), EMBASE and Web of Science. Two reviewers will screen the existing literature and assess the quality of the studies. Disagreements will be resolved through consensus. We anticipate that the analysis will include pairwise and Bayesian network meta-analyses. Most of the trials have studied the impact of exercise training comparing one or two modalities. As a result, little evidence exists to support which interventions will be most effective. The current NMA will address this gap in the literature and assist clinicians and cardiac rehabilitation specialists in making an informed decision. Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals. Ethical approval is not applicable, as no research participants will be involved. PROSPERO Registration number: CRD42022262644. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Systematic Review
Examining Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exercise and Physical Activity as Part of Rehabilitation for People with Stroke: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1707; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031707 - 02 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1780
Abstract
Background: Stroke is the leading cause of chronic physical disability in Western industrialised nations. Despite clear guidelines for exercise in individuals with many non-communicable diseases, the guidance for people with stroke (PwS) who frequently present with multiple comorbidities is less clear. A systematic [...] Read more.
Background: Stroke is the leading cause of chronic physical disability in Western industrialised nations. Despite clear guidelines for exercise in individuals with many non-communicable diseases, the guidance for people with stroke (PwS) who frequently present with multiple comorbidities is less clear. A systematic review of exercise guidelines was undertaken to synthesise themes and patterns. Methods: The review was completed according to the PRISMA statement. Guideline-specific databases were searched for worldwide clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). All included papers underwent quality assessment using the AGREE II protocol. Content synthesis and analysis of the guidelines was undertaken using CERT. Results: Searching identified 2184 papers. After duplicate removal and screening by title and abstract, 22 CPGs remained for review. Seven guidelines identified three key roles for exercise interventions: (1) promoting a healthy lifestyle, (2) prevention of further strokes and (3) rehabilitation. Of concern, many CPGs fail to recommend appropriate safety measures and standards, pre-, during and post-exercise or tailor for specific needs. Conclusions: Global guidelines for exercise in PwS lack in-depth and technical information on the exercise delivery methods, application and dosage required to progress exercise interventions for PwS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Rehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop