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The 20th Anniversary of IJERPH

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
RCMI Center for Urban Health Disparities Research and Innovation, Richard Dixon Research Center, Morgan State University, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251, USA
Interests: environmental health and diseases; gene-environment interactions; environmental toxicology, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis; environmental epidemiology and disease control; health risk assessment and management; ecological risk assessment and management; environmental chemistry and computational toxicology; environmental genomics and proteomics; environmental medicine; and natural resources damage assessment and management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This year (2024), we are celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH, ISSN 1660-4601). Hence, we are organizing a Special Issue to commemorate this important milestone. During the past 20 years, IJERPH has significantly contributed to scientific advancements in the multidisciplinary field of environmental and public health sciences. As such, IJERPH will continue to serve as a forum wherein novel discoveries are widely shared with the scientific community and the general public at large.

This 20th anniversary Special Issue is designed to highlight the excellence in scientific publishing that embodies the mission and supports the vision of IJERPH. In close alignment with the recently updated scope and specific aims of IJERPH, this Special Issue focuses on the transdisciplinary nature of environmental research and public health, and the publication of innovative research findings that promote human health and well-being and improve our collective quality of life.

To help celebrate this important event, we warmly invite you to submit original research papers, comprehensive review articles, and/or short communications from research that address relevant aspects of biological, socio-behavioral, and/or environmental determinants of health for peer-review and possible publication in this Special Issue. We expect that this Special Issue will attract considerable attention, as we prepare to celebrate the excellent scientific contributions and socio-economic impact of IJERPH from the past 20 years.

Prof. Dr. Paul B. Tchounwou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global health
  • health care sciences
  • behavioral and mental health
  • infectious diseases, chronic diseases and disease prevention
  • exercise and health-related quality of life
  • environmental health
  • environmental sciences

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 616 KiB  
Article
Office Design’s Impact on Psychosocial Work Environment and Emotional Health
by Christina Bodin Danielsson and Töres Theorell
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040438 - 03 Apr 2024
Viewed by 826
Abstract
This study explores the association between office design and (a) the psychosocial work environment and (b) the emotional health among 4352 employees in seven different office designs. A multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with adjustments for age and educational level for men [...] Read more.
This study explores the association between office design and (a) the psychosocial work environment and (b) the emotional health among 4352 employees in seven different office designs. A multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with adjustments for age and educational level for men and women separately. Results show that psychosocial factors and emotional exhaustion differ between both office designs and between genders, with best outcomes in cell offices, except for psychological demands that are rated the most favourable in shared-room offices. Cell offices and small open-plan offices show a strong beneficial association with emotional exhaustion in women. Among men, hot-desking is most problematic regarding psychosocial work environment and emotional exhaustion. Women rate the psychosocial environment low in combi-office and report emotional exhaustion in small open offices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 20th Anniversary of IJERPH)
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9 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Children and Adolescents with Early Treated Phenylketonuria: Cognitive Development and Fluctuations of Blood Phenylalanine Levels
by Reinhold Feldmann, Ulrike Och, Lisa Sophie Beckmann, Josef Weglage and Frank Rutsch
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040431 - 02 Apr 2024
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Background: We assessed the relationship between the cognitive development of children and adolescents with phenylketonuria (PKU) and fluctuations in peripheral phenylalanine (Phe) levels. Methods: We examined the neurocognitive performance of 33 children and adolescents with early treated PKU, of whom 18 were treated [...] Read more.
Background: We assessed the relationship between the cognitive development of children and adolescents with phenylketonuria (PKU) and fluctuations in peripheral phenylalanine (Phe) levels. Methods: We examined the neurocognitive performance of 33 children and adolescents with early treated PKU, of whom 18 were treated with sapropterin dihydrochloride, and 15 were on a classic diet. For 26 weeks, patients were assessed weekly for their blood phenylalanine (Phe) levels. Phe levels were analyzed for fluctuations indicated by the individual standard deviation. Fluctuations were compared to the standard deviation of 26 Phe level measurements before the study interval. We also assessed the concurrent IQ of the patients. This was repeated at one-, two-, and seven-year intervals. Results: Full-scale IQ in patients treated with a classic diet did not change within the follow-up. In patients treated with Sapropterin dihydrochloride, however, there was a considerable gain in full-scale IQ. This was particularly true if blood Phe fluctuations increased in patients of this treatment group. Conclusions: Sapropterin dihydrochloride enhances Phe tolerance in patients with PKU. Increasing blood Phe fluctuations following enhanced Phe tolerance may indicate that the treatment not only allows patients to relax their Phe-restricted diet but also may support cognitive development in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 20th Anniversary of IJERPH)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Adaptation of Remote Patient Blood Pressure Monitoring Intervention to Improve Cardiovascular Health and Decrease Maternal Mortality Among Black Women and Birthing Persons
Authors: Loral Patchen; Asli McCullers; Serenity Budd; Joseph Blumenthal; W. Douglas Evans
Affiliation: MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, MD 20782
Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of maternal death among Black women in the United States. A large, urban hospital system will adopt remote patient blood pressure monitoring (RBPM) to increase blood pressure monitoring and improve management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) by reducing time to diagnosis of HDP. The digital platform integrates with the electronic health record (EHR), automatically populating RBPM readings to the patients’ chart; communicates elevated blood pressure values to the health care team; and offers partial off-set of cost through insurance plans. It also allows customization of blood pressure values that prompt follow-up to the patients’ risk category. Objective one measures the effect of the digitally supported RBPM on time to diagnosis of HDP. Objective two tests the effect of cultural tailoring, which may achieve greater equity by promoting social identification with the platform. The ability to tailor digital content provides the opportunity to test the added value of promoting social identification with the intervention, which may help achieve equity in severe maternal morbidity events related to HDP. Thus, the implementation and evaluation of this intervention will contribute to the growing literature on digital health to improve maternity care in the United States.

Title: Public Health: The Interactive and Equitable Environment for the Thriving of Developing Persons.
Authors: Jeanette A. Lawrence 1, Agnes E. Dodds 2
Affiliation: 1 Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia; 2 Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia
Abstract: Public health and wellbeing is inter-dependent with the health and wellbeing of all developing persons in the sociocultural environment, so that to promote public health is tied to the promotion of individuals within the society. Inter-dependency, co-activity and systemic relations dynamically impact the wellbeing of a society. Societal equity and institutional support impact personal thriving and development throughout the whole of the life-course in interaction with social institutions. In this paper, we will present a relational developmental analysis of the inter-dependency of two systems: the public health system and the living system of developing human persons. We present a model of the distribution of personal responses to environmental challenges, ranging from decline through survival to resilience and thriving. We illustrate relational interdependence specifically for marginalized populations, e.g., victims of abuse and refugees. We argue that interdependency and co-activity constitute the appropriate environment for promoting public health as an equitable system and for promoting personalized health as thriving that encompasses personal and societal development and success. The transdisciplinary approach is framed in contemporary developmental science that contextualizes individual development in interacting proximal and distal environmental systems. Keywords: public health, developmental science, behavioral and mental health, environmental sciences

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