ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 3697

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Xue Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: land use change; remote sensing monitoring; model simulation; environmental effects assessment; driving mechanisms analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jia Ning
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Land Surface Pattern and Simulation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: land use and cover change; regional climate model; ecosystem services; surface radiation balance; biogeophysical mechanism
Dr. Yahui Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
Interests: land use change; spatial planning; land economy and policy; rural geography; regional sustainable development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land use change has always been a frontier and hot issue. Scientists have conducted continuous and in-depth research on the depth and breadth of global and regional land use changes. However, with the outbreak of the global COVID-19 epidemic, changes in the international trade situation, and adjustments in national/regional policies, new changes will inevitably occur in the global and regional land use patterns. At the same time, changes in land use will also trigger new changes in land productivity, climate, soil, water quality, and biodiversity. Timely and accurately obtaining global or regional land use change information, and quantitatively assessing the environmental effects of land use changes, can provide a key scientific basis for coping with global changes and the realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, as well as a scientific reference for the resolution of regional human-land conflicts and related policy formulation. Papers addressing the topic on global or regional land use change and its environmental effects are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on providing optimal solutions for global or regional environmental issues.

Dr. Xue Wang
Dr. Jia Ning
Dr. Yahui Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use change
  • remote sensing monitoring
  • environmental effects
  • model simulation
  • land-food-energy-water nexus
  • Sustainable Development Goals

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Evaluation of the Ecological Effects of Ecological Restoration Programs: A Case Study of the Sloping Land Conversion Program on the Loess Plateau, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137841 - 26 Jun 2022
Viewed by 279
Abstract
The Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) is the largest ecological restoration program in the world. Evaluating the ecological effects of the SLCP not only provides a scientific basis for China to improve the SLCP but also provides a reference for other countries in [...] Read more.
The Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) is the largest ecological restoration program in the world. Evaluating the ecological effects of the SLCP not only provides a scientific basis for China to improve the SLCP but also provides a reference for other countries in the world to evaluate the ecological effects of ecological restoration programs being implemented or to be implemented. To this end, we took the Loess Plateau, the core area for the implementation of the SLCP, as an example and, based on multi-source remote sensing data and GIS technology, we conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the ecological effects of the implementation of the SLCP on the Loess Plateau. The results showed that, first, from 2000 to 2018, a total of 12,372.05 km2 of cultivated land was converted into forest land and grassland on the Loess Plateau, and this contributed to an increase in vegetation cover from 45.09% in 2000 to 64.15% in 2018, and a decrease in the soil erosion modulus from 26.41 t·hm−2·yr−1 in 2000 to 17.92 t·hm−2·yr−1 in 2018. Second, the 6–25° slope range is the core area of the Loess Plateau for implementation of the SLCP. In this range, the area of cultivated land converted into forest land and grassland accounts for 60.16% of the total area of transferred cultivated land. As a result, the 6–25° slope range has become the most significant area for improving vegetation cover and reducing the soil erosion intensity, and it is mainly concentrated in the southwestern, central and central-eastern hilly and gully areas of the Loess Plateau. Third, from 2000 to 2018, the climate of the Loess Plateau tended to be warm and humid and was conducive to the implementation of the SLCP. Among these factors, precipitation is the dominant factor in determining the spatial distribution of vegetation on the Loess Plateau, and the increase in precipitation is also the main reason for the promotion of vegetation growth. Fourthly, from 2000 to 2018, the ecological environment of the Loess Plateau was significantly improved as a result of the combined effects of the implementation of the SLCP and climate warming and humidification, but the primary reason is still the implementation of the SLCP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity of Urban Land Expansion and Urban Population Growth under New Urbanization: A Case Study of Chongqing
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7792; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137792 - 25 Jun 2022
Viewed by 256
Abstract
Land urbanization (LU) and population urbanization (PU) maintain the nature of spatiotemporal heterogeneity in China. As a municipality directly administered by the central government in the mode of “large cities and large rural areas”, Chongqing’s urbanization process is the epitome of China’s urbanization [...] Read more.
Land urbanization (LU) and population urbanization (PU) maintain the nature of spatiotemporal heterogeneity in China. As a municipality directly administered by the central government in the mode of “large cities and large rural areas”, Chongqing’s urbanization process is the epitome of China’s urbanization process. This paper examines the spatiotemporal variability of LU and PU in Chongqing on the basis of nighttime light data, the elasticity coefficient of the coupling relationship, and GWR. The results show that (1) the urban land and urban population in Chongqing grew notably from 2008 to 2018, with average annual growth rates of 9.4% and 2.3%, respectively. (2) The coupling coordination coefficient of LU and PU in Chongqing was 0.24, and the total number of districts and counties with uncoordinated development increased, but the overall uncoordinated situation gradually improved over the period. (3) The influence of PU on LU in each district and county increased year by year, and it showed a decreasing trend from southwest to northeast in Chongqing, which indicates that LU was increasingly adapted to the construction needs of PU. The gap between LU and PU widened due to the household registration system, land fiscal policies and other policies. After the reform of the household registration system and the adjustment of new pilot policies targeting the construction of new-type urbanization, the coupling relationship between LU and PU was gradually improving to the coordinated mode. The findings indicate that Chinese urban areas should adhere to the principle of new-type urbanization construction and carry out scientific land planning strategies, strictly controlling land expansion to promote the reasonable development of population growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Effects of the Ecological Conservation Redline in China: A Case Study in Anji County
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7701; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137701 - 23 Jun 2022
Viewed by 234
Abstract
The Ecological Conservation Redline (ECR) of China plays an important role in avoiding ecological space occupancy and maintaining regional ecological security. Anji County in Zhejiang Province is one of the first regions to implement the ECR in China. This paper takes Anji County [...] Read more.
The Ecological Conservation Redline (ECR) of China plays an important role in avoiding ecological space occupancy and maintaining regional ecological security. Anji County in Zhejiang Province is one of the first regions to implement the ECR in China. This paper takes Anji County as an example to analyze the effects of ECR. To do this, we first set up two scenarios with the CLUE-S model: a normal land-use development scenario (NLDS) and an ECR implementation scenario (ECRS); then we compare the land use of 2010 and 2015 under NLDS and ECRS. Land use, ecosystem services value (ESV), landscape metrics, and ecological product outputs were compared between the entire county and the ECR areas. The results revealed the following: (1) From 2000 to 2015, the ecological land in Anji County decreased by 4.03%, while it decreased by 1.17% in the ECR areas. (2) In the ECR areas, there was less arable land and construction land of the ECRS than in the NLDS, which indicates the ECR impeded the expansion of construction land and arable land in the ECR areas. (3) The ECR areas account for 39% of Anji County but contribute more than 80% to the ESV of the whole county. During 2000–2015, the ESV of the entire county decreased while the ESV of the ECR areas increased. (4) From 2000 to 2015, whereas landscape fragmentation of the entire county increased, that of ECR areas decreased. (5) Since the ECR’s implementation, Anji County has vigorously developed the bamboo industry, ecological agriculture, the tourism industry, and achieved rapid economic development via industrial restructuring and transformation. On the whole, the ECR has neither adversely affected land development nor economic development but instead has promoted the optimization of the land’s spatial development pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Projected Losses of Ecosystem Services Incurred by Reserve Resources of Cultivated Land Development and Development Priority: A Case Study of Linzhou City in Henan Province, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6627; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116627 - 29 May 2022
Viewed by 329
Abstract
The development of reserve resources of cultivated land (RRCL) is a vital way of supplementing cultivated land, and plays a crucial role in ensuring food security. However, if we blindly pursue the quantity of development while ignoring the conservation of the ecosystem, we [...] Read more.
The development of reserve resources of cultivated land (RRCL) is a vital way of supplementing cultivated land, and plays a crucial role in ensuring food security. However, if we blindly pursue the quantity of development while ignoring the conservation of the ecosystem, we are likely to waste land resources and destroy the ecological environment. Therefore, it is necessary to address the urgent issue of preventing ecological risks resulting from the development of RRCL and to enhance the actual effect of supplementing cultivated land. Taking Linzhou City in Henan Province as an example, this paper first assessed the tillability of RRCL and estimated the functionality of ecosystem services. Then it projected the losses of ecosystem services incurred by RRCL development, based on which it determined the development priority. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) The total area of RRCL in Linzhou City amounts to 8845 hectares. (2) According to the research forecast, the total annual losses of ecosystem services incurred by RRCL development in Linzhou City include: water conservation of 776,200 m3, soil retention of 340.84 t, and carbon sequestration and oxygen release of 2311.12 t. Moreover, the total value of losses amounts to RMB 15.7754 million. (3) The ecological losses incurred by RRCL development vary with the different types of land. Overall, the ecological loss derived from reclaimable land is inferior to that of cultivable land, with the average value of ecological loss amounting to RMB 600 and RMB 5300 per hectare, respectively. The ecological loss from the development of class II land is: pond < garden land < artificial grassland < artificial forest land < natural grassland < bare land. Moreover, land development should be postponed when the quantity of ecological losses reaches level III or higher. (4) Corrections are made based on the ecological coefficient of the economic potential of RRCL development so as to determine the priority of development. The research findings indicate that the priority of development of eastern towns is higher than that of central and western towns in Linzhou City, with Donggang and Hengshui topping the priority list and Shibanyan, Lingyang, and Chengguan having the lowest priority. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Study on the Water Quality Characteristics of the Baoan Lake Basin in China under Different Land Use and Landscape Pattern Distributions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106082 - 17 May 2022
Viewed by 347
Abstract
Land use and landscape pattern highly affect water quality. Their relationship can assist in land-use management and improve land-use efficiency. In this study, a water quality survey of rivers and lakes was performed in 2020 to analyze the effects of land use and [...] Read more.
Land use and landscape pattern highly affect water quality. Their relationship can assist in land-use management and improve land-use efficiency. In this study, a water quality survey of rivers and lakes was performed in 2020 to analyze the effects of land use and the landscape pattern on the water quality of the rivers and lakes in the Baoan Lake basin and is expected to provide a reference for land use planning. The results demonstrated that the effects of land use on water quality were generally higher during the dry season than during the wet season; however, the opposite was demonstrated for the landscape pattern index. Cropland and urban land were closely correlated with deteriorating water quality, with contributions to total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and ammonia nitrogen in the basin. The impact of the landscape pattern of the basin on water quality was controlled by the original land-use type. In addition, the landscape configuration formed different land-use types to produce different effects on water quality. The basin scale better explained the changes in water quality, especially for construction land, followed by the 250 m and 500 m scales in the buffer zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Farmers’ Willingness to Gather Homesteads and the Influencing Factors—An Empirical Study of Different Geomorphic Areas in Chongqing
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5252; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095252 - 26 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 370
Abstract
Research purpose: to analyze farmers’ willingness to gather homestead and its influencing factors, so as to provide decision-making basis for the rational layout of rural homestead. Methods: questionnaire, logistic model. The results are as follows. (1) Farmers’ willingness to gather homesteads is highest [...] Read more.
Research purpose: to analyze farmers’ willingness to gather homestead and its influencing factors, so as to provide decision-making basis for the rational layout of rural homestead. Methods: questionnaire, logistic model. The results are as follows. (1) Farmers’ willingness to gather homesteads is highest in dam areas, followed by hilly areas, and is lowest in mountainous areas. (2) The respondents’ age, family support ratio, housing structure, whether the access road is paved, and the distance from the main road have significant negative impacts on farmers’ willingness to gather homesteads, while homesteads being idle, the service life of the house, the type of daily energy use, and whether they are far from relatives after relocation have significant positive impacts on farmers’ willingness to gather homesteads. (3) The main influencing factors of farmers’ homestead agglomeration in dam areas are the idle situation of a homestead, housing structure, the service life of the house, and whether they are satisfied with their current homestead residence. (4) The main influencing factors of farmers’ homestead agglomeration in hilly areas are the age of the respondents, the proportion of family workers, and whether they accept the relocation and are far from relatives. (5) The main influencing factors of farmers’ homestead agglomeration in mountainous areas are the age of the respondents, the ratio of family support, the housing structure, and whether the access road is paved. We conclude that there are significant differences in farmers’ willingness to gather homesteads and the influencing factors in different geomorphic areas. Policy makers should formulate differentiated homestead agglomeration optimization schemes and design the optimization paths of homestead agglomeration on the basis of geomorphic classification and subregion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Assessment of the Ecological Protection Effectiveness of Protected Areas Using Propensity Score Matching: A Case Study in Sichuan, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4920; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084920 - 18 Apr 2022
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Protected areas constitute a global strategic resource for enhancing the effectiveness of ecological protection, which can alleviate the impact of unsustainable human production and living activities on the ecological environment. However, the spatiotemporal evolution of ecological protection effectiveness needs to be quantitatively revealed. [...] Read more.
Protected areas constitute a global strategic resource for enhancing the effectiveness of ecological protection, which can alleviate the impact of unsustainable human production and living activities on the ecological environment. However, the spatiotemporal evolution of ecological protection effectiveness needs to be quantitatively revealed. The net primary productivity (NPP) of plants is an important measure of the effectiveness of ecological protection efforts. The main purpose of this study is to use the relative change in the annual average NPP to evaluate the ecological protection effectiveness of protected areas. We compared the historical changes in the annual average NPP of protected areas in Sichuan Province from 2000 to 2019. We added the spatial coordinates to the impact factor system and adopted propensity score matching (PSM) in a quasi-natural experimental method to determine the experimental group and the control group. The ecological protection effectiveness of the protected areas in the study area in 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2019 was measured and classified into three types of changes in protection effectiveness, namely effective, ineffective, or fluctuating. According to the administrative level, type, and spatial distribution, we determined the number and type of changes in the protection effectiveness of different protected areas. The results show that the annual average NPP of the protected areas in Sichuan Province generally fluctuated. The annual average NPP increased in 95.47% of the total protected area and decreased in 4.53%. The overall protection effectiveness of protected areas was positive and significant and gradually improved. Effective protected areas at the national, provincial, and county levels accounted for 40.27% of the total number of protected areas, and the other 14.77% of effective protected area was managed at other administrative levels. Among the different types of protected areas, the proportion of effective protected areas was highest in wild animal protected areas, followed by forest ecology protected areas, wild plant protected areas, and wetland ecology protected areas. The results of this study can provide an important reference for the verification and improvement of the ecological protection effectiveness of various protected areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Simulating Urban Expansion Based on Ecological Security Pattern—A Case Study of Hangzhou, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010301 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 562
Abstract
Disordered urban expansion has encroached on a large amount of ecological land, resulting in the steady degradation of urban ecology, which has an adverse effect on the sustainable development of the region. An ecological security pattern can effectively control urban expansion, and it [...] Read more.
Disordered urban expansion has encroached on a large amount of ecological land, resulting in the steady degradation of urban ecology, which has an adverse effect on the sustainable development of the region. An ecological security pattern can effectively control urban expansion, and it is of great significance to balance urban development and ecological protection. In order to analyze the impact of ecological security patterns on urban expansion, Hangzhou was taken as an example, the CA-Markov model and FLUS model were used to simulate the urban expansion pattern in 2030 under the natural development scenario and the ecological security scenario. The results showed that (1) the ecological source area in the study area is 630.90 km2 and was mainly distributed in the western mountainous area. There are 14 ecological corridors, primarily composed of valleys and rivers. Ecological nodes are mainly distributed on the north and south sides of the main urban area. (2) From 2000 to 2018, the annual increase index (AI) of construction land decreased in the northeast and southeast directions but increased in the northwest and southwest directions, and in the northeast direction the value was always the highest. Except for the southwest direction, the average annual growth rate (AGR) of construction land in the other directions decreased. At a distance from the city center of 30 km, AI was relatively higher and was increasing, while AGR was declining. At a distance of 30–45 km, both AI and AGR were increasing, indicating that the focus of construction land was moving outwards. (3) From 2018 to 2030, under both natural development scenario and ecological security scenario, construction land would keep expanding, but the construction land area, proportion, AI, and AGR of the latter would both be smaller than the former, indicating that the ecological security pattern can effectively curb urban expansion. Because of a large amount area of ecological sources, the expansion of construction land in the southwest direction would be constrained, especially under the ecological security scenario. The methods and results of this study can provide theoretical and application references for urban planning and green development in metropolises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Change and Its Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop