Special Issue "Human Health and Environmental Exposure Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Darryl B. Hood
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: inhalation toxicology (prenatal exposure models autism); developmental neurobiology (somatosensory cortex); behavioral neurobiology (development of structure-specific paradigms); environmental and biochemical toxicology (Nitroxides, PAH’s); dispersion modeling of PAH’s in environmental justice communities; structural biology, protein structure and function; environmental-exposure health assessment questionnaire development; modeling exposures across lifetime using public health exposome approach

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiple exposures from the built, natural, physical, and social environment are thought to differentially moderate adverse chronic disease health outcomes in a “place-based” manner. There are a multiplicity of publicly available datasets that span the natural, built, physical, and social environments and include chemical and non-chemical stressor measures. These datasets include atmospheric conditions; EPA Air Quality System criteria (air pollutants, particulates, and meteorological data (e.g., PM2.5 and heat)); toxicants; chemical emissions; land cover data; and measures of the built environment, including land use, Toxic Release Inventory data, facilities, traffic-related pollution, highways, neighborhood resources, health care facilities, and occupational codes. Social environmental stressors include population-level measures of social, demographic, economic, and political variables. While most of these data elements have been standardized as annual county measures, many are also available at smaller geospatial units to include block groups; census tracts; zip codes; and 1-, 3-, 10-, and 12-km grids.

While many of the aforementioned variables may be statistically correlated with components of air pollution indices and other environmental variables, their utility for use in traditional risk assessment frameworks is limited due to cross-correlations, differences in dose–response predictivity, and proximity to apical outcomes (e.g., early effect biomarkers and clinical signs).

This Special Issue is intended to provide an opportunity for the research community to publish valuable results from assessments describing cumulative effects from exposure to combinations of chemical and non-chemical stressors on chronic disease outcomes. Manuscripts describing models that support new approaches for conducting cumulative risk assessments towards assessing the impacts of multiple, interactive, and cumulative exposures from the environment on adverse personal health events and population-level health disparities are encouraged.

The overarching theme of Human Health and Environmental Exposure Assessment should be at the center of these manuscripts. Reviews, research articles, methodological studies, and papers concerning relevant policies and regulations are solicited. Please provide an abstract beforehand so we can confirm its suitability to the intended theme. We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Darryl B. Hood
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical and non-chemical stressors
  • cumulative risk trajectories
  • Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) analytics
  • combined effects
  • multiple exposures
  • place-based disparities
  • vulnerable populations
  • social ecological life-course framework

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Assessment of Lead and Mercury Exposure Levels in the General Population of Korea Using Integrated National Biomonitoring Data
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6932; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136932 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 531
Abstract
In Korea, the estimated values of blood lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) levels differ between two national-level biomonitors, namely the Korean National Environmental Health Survey and the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The present study used integrated data from these surveys [...] Read more.
In Korea, the estimated values of blood lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) levels differ between two national-level biomonitors, namely the Korean National Environmental Health Survey and the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The present study used integrated data from these surveys to estimate the representative values of the change in concentration and recent distribution characteristics. The yearly trend of age-standardized exposure levels in regular adults was identified, and the geometric mean (GM) adjusted according to demographic characteristics was presented. Age-standardized GM for blood Pb and Hg in the integrated data was 2.06 and 3.64 μg/L in 2008, respectively, which decreased to 1.55 and 2.92 μg/L, respectively, by 2017. Adjusted GMs from most recently conducted surveys (2015–2017) were 1.61 and 2.98 μg/L for blood Pb and Hg, respectively. In particular, the adjusted percentage of blood Hg exceeding the reference value of 5 μg/L was 20.79%. While the blood Pb and Hg exposure levels are decreasing in Korea, the levels remain high relative to those in other countries. The Hg levels exceeded the reference value in many individuals. Therefore, continued biomonitoring must be conducted, and a reduction plan and exposure management are needed for harmful metals, including Hg. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health and Environmental Exposure Assessment)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Big Data to Knowledge Analytics reveals the Zika virus epidemic as only one of multiple factors contributing to year-over-year 28-fold increase in microcephaly incidence
Author: Darryl B. Hood
Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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