Topical Collection "Environmental Chemistry and Technology"

Editor

Prof. Dr. Daniela Varrica
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e del Mare (DiSTeM) Via Archirafi 36 - 90123 Palermo, Italy
Interests: different aspects of environmental geochemistry; ranging from hydrogeochemistry to air; water and soil pollution in volcanic; mining and anthropic areas
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

In a historical moment of rapid environmental changes, critical energy, demographic development, and environmental chemistry, coupled with technological development, must address numerous problems in order to understand the influence of human activities on the transport, transformation, and fate of organic pollutants and inorganic.

Environmental chemistry examines the chemical and biological phenomena that occur in the natural environment. In particular, it studies the interaction of chemical substances (sources, functions, reactions, transport, effects, and destiny) in ecosystems (water, air, soil, and living organisms).

The fields of applications can be very extensive, including a) hydrogeochemistry: aqueous models to explain the chemical reactions and transport processes in natural or polluted water; b) atmospheric chemistry: assessments of environmental concentrations of PM, gaseous pollutants, trace elements, and chemical speciation of atmospheric particulates; c) soil chemistry and remediation; d) environmental geochemistry; and e) monitoring air pollution using new technologies.

Environmental chemistry and technology can be extensively used to develop new analytical techniques to determine the presence of pollutants in several environmental spheres (water, soil, and air), providing important support for environmental protection agencies.

Prof. Dr. Daniela Varrica
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aquatic chemistry: oxidation/reduction in aquatic chemistry; phase interactions in aquatic chemistry; aquatic microbial biochemistry; water pollutants and water pollution; chemical limnology
  • Atmospheric chemistry: particles in the atmosphere; gaseous inorganic air pollutants; gaseous inorganic air pollutants; photochemical smog
  • Soil chemistry and sediment remediation
  • The geosphere and geochemistry
  • Chemical and biochemical techniques; advanced technologies and materials for environmental pollution prevention and control
  • Environmental technology and ecosystems management
  • Alternative energy technologies
  • Industrial ecology and green chemistry: water renovation and recycling; resources and sustainable materials; industrial ecology for waste minimization, utilization, and treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

2020

Open AccessCommunication
Graphene Oxide–ZnO Nanocomposites for Removal of Aluminum and Copper Ions from Acid Mine Drainage Wastewater
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6911; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186911 - 21 Sep 2020
Abstract
Adsorption technologies are a focus of interest for the removal of pollutants in water treatment systems. These removal methods offer several design, operation and efficiency advantages over other wastewater remediation technologies. Particularly, graphene oxide (GO) has attracted great attention due to its high [...] Read more.
Adsorption technologies are a focus of interest for the removal of pollutants in water treatment systems. These removal methods offer several design, operation and efficiency advantages over other wastewater remediation technologies. Particularly, graphene oxide (GO) has attracted great attention due to its high surface area and its effectiveness in removing heavy metals. In this work, we study the functionalization of GO with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) to improve the removal capacity of aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) in acidic waters. Experiments were performed at different pH conditions (with and without pH adjustment). In both cases, decorated GO (GO/ZnO) nanocomposites showed an improvement in the removal capacity compared with non-functionalized GO, even when the pH of zero charge (pHPZC) was higher for GO/ZnO (5.57) than for GO (3.98). In adsorption experiments without pH adjustment, the maximum removal capacities for Al and Cu were 29.1 mg/g and 45.5 mg/g, respectively. The maximum removal percentages of the studied cations (Al and Cu) were higher than 88%. Further, under more acidic conditions (pH 4), the maximum sorption capacities using GO/ZnO as adsorbent were 19.9 mg/g and 33.5 mg/g for Al and Cu, respectively. Moreover, the removal percentages reach 95.6% for Al and 92.9% for Cu. This shows that decoration with ZnO nanoparticles is a good option for improving the sorption capacity of GO for Cu removal and to a lesser extent for Al, even when the pH was not favorable in terms of electrostatic affinity for cations. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the potential and effectiveness of GO functionalization with ZnO nanoparticles to treat acidic waters contaminated with heavy metals and its applicability for wastewater remediation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Estimation on Fixed-Bed Column Parameters of Breakthrough Behaviors for Gold Recovery by Adsorption onto Modified/Functionalized Amberlite XAD7
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6868; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186868 - 20 Sep 2020
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to evaluate the potential of a new adsorbent material to recover Au (III) from real wastewater, in a column with a fixed bed in a dynamic regime. The material was obtained through functionalization, by impregnation of the [...] Read more.
The objective of this paper was to evaluate the potential of a new adsorbent material to recover Au (III) from real wastewater, in a column with a fixed bed in a dynamic regime. The material was obtained through functionalization, by impregnation of the commercial resin, Amberlite XAD 7 type, with L-glutamic acid, which has active groups –NH2 and –COOH. The goal of the experiments was to follow the correlation of fixed-bed column specific adsorption parameters (the effluent volume, the amounts of adsorbent, heights of the adsorbent layer in column) with the time necessary to cross the column. The experimental data obtained were modeled, using the Bohart–Adams, Yoon–Nelson Thomas and Clark models, to establish the mechanism of the Au (III) recovery process, in a dynamic regime. Also, we established the number of cycles for adsorption–desorption for which the new material can be used. We used 5% HNO3 (5%) as desorption agent in five adsorption–desorption cycles, until the process was no longer efficient. The degree of desorption varied between 84% and 34% from cycle 1 to cycle 5. Full article
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Figure 1

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