Special Issue "Risk Management of COVID-19 and Public Health: Medical, Economic, Finance, Business, Political and Educational Implications"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Michael McAleer
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Finance, College of Management, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan Discipline of Business Analytics, University of Sydney Business School, Sydney 2006, Australia Econometric Institute, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3062 Rotterdam, The Netherlands Department of Economic Analysis and ICAE, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501, Japan
Interests: theoretical and applied econometrics; financial econometrics; financial economics; finance, theoretical and applied statistics; time series analysis; forecasting; risk management; energy economics and finance; applied mathematics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Chia-Lin Chang
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Applied Economics and Department of Finance, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan Department of Finance, College of Management, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan
Interests: applied econometrics; financial econometrics; energy finance; time series analysis; forecasting; empirical industrial organisation; risk management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Daniel J. Slottje
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275, USA
Senior Managing Director, FTI Consulting Inc., Dallas, TX 75275, USA
Interests: econometrics; economics; risk management; statistics; intellectual property; forecasting; inequality; income and earnings distributions; Lorenz curves; human capital; maximum entropy; demand systems; volatility; neural networks; litigation; antitrust; worklife expectancy; productivity; income tax progression; labour markets; poverty; economic liberty; welfare
Prof. Dr. Teodosio Pérez Amaral
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Economic Analysis, Complutense University, Madrid 28223, Spain
Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico, ICAE, Madrid 28223, Spain
Interests: econometrics; economics; risk measurement and management; statistics; panel data econometrics; telecommunications demand systems; volatility; model building and selection; specification testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although first detected in January 2020, COVID-19 has now joined the lexicon of international pandemic diseases alongside the flu, SARS, and MERS, among others. To date there is little that is known about the disease, including issues associated with:

  • Control;
  • Inspection;
  • Contamination;
  • How it is spread;
  • Who is at risk;
  • Age, gender, previous illnesses, and smoking;
  • Virulence;
  • Incubation, infection, and recovery periods;
  • Mutations and strains;
  • Vaccination;
  • False positive and false negative diagnoses;
  • Preventative measures;
  • Reinfection;
  • Access to health and medical facilities;
  • Healthcare costs;
  • Absence of follow up after release from quarantine;
  • Self-quarantining;

It is essential to critically examine the risk management issues associated with COVID-19, with an emphasis on the implications for public health, health and medical care, economics, finance, business, politics, and education.

Prof. Dr. Michael McAleer
Prof. Dr. Chia-Lin Chang
Prof. Dr. Daniel J. Slottje
Prof. Dr. Teodosio Pérez Amaral
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health care and nursing professionals
  • Medical and bio-medical research
  • Immunology and virology
  • Vaccines
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Business
  • Politics
  • Global distance education
  • Online teaching and learning
  • Education
  • Tourism

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
The Spread of the Covid-19 Pandemic in Time and Space
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113827 - 28 May 2020
Abstract
As the COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on public health and global economies in 2020; it is crucial to understand how it developed and spread in time and space. This paper contributes to the growing literature by considering the dynamics of [...] Read more.
As the COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on public health and global economies in 2020; it is crucial to understand how it developed and spread in time and space. This paper contributes to the growing literature by considering the dynamics of country-wise growth rates of infection numbers. Low-order serial correlation of growth rates is predominantly negative with cycles of two to four days for most countries. The results of fitted spatial autoregressive models suggest that there is high degree of spillover between countries. Forecast variances of many countries, in particular those with a high absolute number of infections, can to a large extent be explained by structural innovations of other countries. A better understanding of the serial and spatial dynamics of the spread of the pandemic may contribute to an improved containment and risk management. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Alternative Global Health Security Indexes for Risk Analysis of COVID-19
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3161; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093161 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Given the volume of research and discussion on the health, medical, economic, financial, political, and travel advisory aspects of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, it is essential to enquire if an outbreak of the epidemic might have been anticipated, given [...] Read more.
Given the volume of research and discussion on the health, medical, economic, financial, political, and travel advisory aspects of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, it is essential to enquire if an outbreak of the epidemic might have been anticipated, given the well-documented history of SARS and MERS, among other infectious diseases. If various issues directly related to health security risks could have been predicted accurately, public health and medical contingency plans might have been prepared and activated in advance of an epidemic such as COVID-19. This paper evaluates an important source of health security, the Global Health Security Index (2019), which provided data before the discovery of COVID-19 in December 2019. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate how countries might have been prepared for a global epidemic, or pandemic, and acted accordingly in an effective and timely manner. The GHS index numerical scores are calculated as the arithmetic (AM), geometric (GM), and harmonic (HM) means of six categories, where AM uses equal weights for each category. The GHS Index scores are regressed on the numerical score rankings of the six categories to check if the use of equal weights of 0.167 in the calculation of the GHS Index using AM is justified, with GM and HM providing a check of the robustness of the arithmetic mean. The highest weights are determined to be around 0.244–0.246, while the lowest weights are around 0.186–0.187 for AM. The ordinal GHS Index is regressed on the ordinal rankings of the six categories to check for the optimal weights in the calculation of the ordinal Global Health Security (GHS) Index, where the highest weight is 0.368, while the lowest is 0.142, so the estimated results are wider apart than for the numerical score rankings. Overall, Rapid Response and Detection and Reporting have the largest impacts on the GHS Index score, whereas Risk Environment and Prevention have the smallest effects. The quantitative and qualitative results are different when GM and HM are used. Full article

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessBrief Report
The Exponential Phase of the Covid-19 Pandemic in Central Italy: An Integrated Care Pathway
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3792; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113792 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Coronavirus Disease (Covid-19) pandemic is rapidly spreading across the world, representing an unparalleled challenge for health care systems. There are differences in the estimated fatality rates, which cannot be explained easily. In Italy, the estimated case fatality rate was 12.7% in mid-April, [...] Read more.
The Coronavirus Disease (Covid-19) pandemic is rapidly spreading across the world, representing an unparalleled challenge for health care systems. There are differences in the estimated fatality rates, which cannot be explained easily. In Italy, the estimated case fatality rate was 12.7% in mid-April, while Germany remained at 1.8%. Moreover, it is to be noted that different areas of Italy have very different lethality rates. Due to the complexity of Covid-19 patient management, it is of paramount importance to develop a well-defined clinical workflow in order to avoid the inconsistent management of patients. The Integrated Care Pathway (ICP) represents a multidisciplinary outline of anticipated care to support patient management in the Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome. The main objective of this pilot study was to develop a new ICP evaluated by care indicators, in order to improve the COVID-19 patient management. The suggested ICP was developed by a multi-professional team composed of different specialists and administrators already involved in clinical and management processes. After a review of current internal practices and published evidences, we identified (1) the activities performed during care delivery, (2) the responsibilities for these activities, (3) hospital structural adaptation needs and potential improvements, and (4) ICP indicators. The process map formed the basis of the final ICP document; 160 COVID-19 inpatients were considered, and the effect of the ICP implementation was evaluated over time during the exponential phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. In conclusion, a rapid adoption of ICP and regular audits of quality indicators for the management of COVID-19 patients might be important tools to improve the quality of care and outcomes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop