ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 23636

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea
Interests: metabolomics; natural product chemistry; bioactive compounds; anti-inflammatory; antiglycation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Systems Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
2. Department of Bio and Healing Convergence at Graduate School, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
Interests: horticultural therapy; urban agriculture; green care
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forest Resources, Kongju National University, Chungnam, Korea
Interests: forest; nature therapy; health promotion; physiological evaluation; individual difference
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. For modern people, it is not easy to stay healthy because of many reasons such as stress, environmental pollution, urbanization. Complementary and alternative medicine is the term for medical products and practices that are not part of the standard medical care. In particular, nature-based complementary and alternative medicine is necessary for maintaining homeostasis, which is the ability or tendency of an organism to maintain internal stability, compensating for environmental changes. In addition, nature-based complementary and alternative medicine improves or recovers health. Nature-based complementary and alternative medicine includes horticultural therapy, forest therapy, care farming, natural products with therapeutic effects, etc.

This Special Issue seeks papers about the health benefits of nature-based complementary and alternative medicine established by using scientific research methodology and evaluation. We also welcome high-quality systematic reviews or meta-analysis papers related to these matters. We would be very happy if this Special Issue serves as a trigger for considering more effective applications of nature-based complementary and alternative medicine in the future.

Prof. Dr. Choong Hwan Lee
Prof. Dr. Sin-Ae Park
Dr. Chorong Song
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Horticultural therapy
  • Therapeutic horticulture
  • Garden therapy
  • Forest therapy
  • Green care
  • Care farming
  • Nature-based intervention
  • Natural product
  • Preventive medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 1972 KiB  
Article
Psychophysiological Responses of Humans during Seed-Sowing Activity Using Soil Inoculated with Streptomyces rimosus
by Na-Yoon Choi, Sin-Ae Park, Ye-Rim Lee and Choong Hwan Lee
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316275 - 5 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1609
Abstract
Electroencephalogram (EEG) responses and serum metabolite levels were used to investigate the effects of horticultural activities (seed-sowing) on the psychophysiological aspects of adults based on the presence or absence of the soil microorganism Streptomyces rimosus. In this case, 31 adults were subjected [...] Read more.
Electroencephalogram (EEG) responses and serum metabolite levels were used to investigate the effects of horticultural activities (seed-sowing) on the psychophysiological aspects of adults based on the presence or absence of the soil microorganism Streptomyces rimosus. In this case, 31 adults were subjected to seed-sowing activities using S. rimosus inoculated (experimental group) and medium (control group) soils. EEG was measured to analyze the resulting psychophysiological response, and blood samples (5 mL) were collected. The relative gamma power (RG), relative high beta (RHB), and SEF 50 and SEF 90 were significantly higher in the right than in the left occipital lobe (p < 0.05). In both occipital lobes, ratios of SMR to theta (RST), mid beta to theta (RMT), and SMR-mid beta to theta (RSMT) were high (p < 0.05). GC-TOF-MS-based serum metabolite analysis detected 33 metabolites. Compared to the control group, the experimental group showed a lower content of amino acids (except aspartic acid), lipids, and C6 sugar monomers after the activity (p < 0.05). Aminomalonic acid was decreased, and aspartic acid was increased (p < 0.05). This study confirmed a positive effect on improving the concentration and attention of adults when seed-sowing activity was performed using S. rimosus-inoculated soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 334 KiB  
Article
Horticultural Therapy for Improving the Work Performance and Interpersonal Relationships of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities
by Hyo-Jung Son, Dae-Sik Kim and Sin-Ae Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13874; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113874 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2266
Abstract
For the occupational adaptation and social integration of the intellectually disabled, it is helpful to improve their work performance and interpersonal skills. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of horticultural therapy (HT) programs to improve work performance and interpersonal [...] Read more.
For the occupational adaptation and social integration of the intellectually disabled, it is helpful to improve their work performance and interpersonal skills. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of horticultural therapy (HT) programs to improve work performance and interpersonal relationships of persons with intellectual disabilities. Based on observations and analyses of how people with intellectual disabilities work, we have developed a 12-session HT program that includes upper limb movements and physical activities to improve hand function. We recruited, with the consent of their legal guardians, 14 (6 males, 8 females) participants who had intellectual disabilities and were working at a sheltered workshop in K-gu, Seoul, South Korea. The program consisted of twelve sixty-minute sessions that were conducted twice a week at a rooftop garden. For pre- and post-evaluation of the program, the survey of functional adaptive behavior (SFAB), interpersonal negotiation strategies, a horticultural job evaluation (self), hand function tests (pegboard, pinch gauge, fingertips), and blood sample tests for physiological indicators of exercise were conducted. Interpersonal negotiation strategies, functional adaptive behaviors, and physical abilities for job behaviors, including agility and grasping of the hand, improved significantly from before to after the program (p < 0.05). A positive result of VEGF (vascular endothermic growth factor) in blood sample tests implies the need for further research on cognitive changes caused by horticultural activities. This study has limitations due to the small number of participants, but the results suggest that low- to medium-intensity horticultural treatment programs using the upper body and hands could be effective for vocational rehabilitation of the intellectually disabled. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
15 pages, 3227 KiB  
Article
Psychophysiological and Metabolomics Responses of Adults during Horticultural Activities Using Soil Inoculated with Streptomyces rimosus: A Pilot Study
by Seon-Ok Kim, Min Ji Kim, Na-Yoon Choi, Jin Hee Kim, Myung Sook Oh, Choong Hwan Lee and Sin-Ae Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12901; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912901 - 8 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2246
Abstract
This study compared the physiological effects at a metabolomics level with autonomic nervous system responses in adults during soil mixing activities, based on the presence or absence of Streptomyces rimosus in the soil. Thirty adult participants performed soil mixing activities for 5 min [...] Read more.
This study compared the physiological effects at a metabolomics level with autonomic nervous system responses in adults during soil mixing activities, based on the presence or absence of Streptomyces rimosus in the soil. Thirty adult participants performed soil mixing activities for 5 min using sterilized soil with culture media and Streptomyces rimosus, respectively. Blood samples were drawn twice from each participant after each activity. Electroencephalograms were measured during the activity. Serum metabolites underwent metabolite profiling by gas chromatography, followed by multivariate analyses. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and C-reactive protein levels were measured by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Soil-emitted volatile organic compounds were identified via solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy, followed by multivariate analyses. The volatile compound analysis revealed that the terpenoid and benzoid compounds, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol were greater in soil with Streptomyces rimosus. Serum metabolomics revealed that the treatment group (soil inoculated with Streptomyces rimosus) possessed relatively higher levels of serotonin compared to the control group (soil mixed with culture media), and serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly lower in the treatment group. In the treatment group, the electroencephalogram revealed that alpha band activity of the occipital lobe increased. This study concludes that Streptomyces rimosus soil contact can positively affect human metabolic and autonomic reactions. Therefore, this pilot study confirmed the possible role of soil microorganisms in horticultural activities for psychophysiological effects in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 998 KiB  
Article
Effects of Olfactory Stimulation with Aroma Oils on Psychophysiological Responses of Female Adults
by Na-Yoon Choi, Yu-Tong Wu and Sin-Ae Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5196; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095196 - 25 Apr 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 5773
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of olfactory stimulation with aroma oils on the psychophysiological responses in women. Ten aromatic oils (lavender, rosemary, rose, eucalyptus, jasmine, geranium, chamomile, clary sage, thyme, and peppermint) were used on 23 women aged between 20 and 60 years. [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of olfactory stimulation with aroma oils on the psychophysiological responses in women. Ten aromatic oils (lavender, rosemary, rose, eucalyptus, jasmine, geranium, chamomile, clary sage, thyme, and peppermint) were used on 23 women aged between 20 and 60 years. They inhaled the scent for 90 s through a glass funnel attached to their lab apron, 10 cm below their nose, while the pump was activated. Electroencephalography, blood pressure, and pulse rate were measured before and during inhalation of the aroma oils. The relative alpha (RA) power spectrums indicating relaxation and resting state of the brain significantly increased when lavender, rosemary, eucalyptus, jasmine, chamomile, clary sage, and thyme oils were inhaled compared to those of before olfactory stimulation. The ratio of alpha to high beta (RAHB), an indicator of brain stability and relaxation, significantly increased when rosemary, jasmine, clary sage, and peppermint oils were inhaled. The relative low beta (RLB) power spectrum, an indicator of brain activity in the absence of stress, significantly increased when stimulated with lavender, rosemary, rose, and geranium scents. Further, systolic blood pressure significantly decreased after introduction of all 10 types of aromatic oils, which indicates stress reduction. Thus, olfactory stimulation with aroma oil had a stabilizing effect on the prefrontal cortex and brain activity and decreased systolic blood pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

18 pages, 3664 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness of Mantra-Based Meditation on Mental Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Yolanda Álvarez-Pérez, Amado Rivero-Santana, Lilisbeth Perestelo-Pérez, Andrea Duarte-Díaz, Vanesa Ramos-García, Ana Toledo-Chávarri, Alezandra Torres-Castaño, Beatriz León-Salas, Diego Infante-Ventura, Nerea González-Hernández, Leticia Rodríguez-Rodríguez and Pedro Serrano-Aguilar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3380; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063380 - 13 Mar 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 10821
Abstract
Background: Meditation is defined as a form of cognitive training that aims to improve attentional and emotional self-regulation. This systematic review aims to evaluate the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness and safety of mantra-based meditation techniques (MBM), in comparison to passive or [...] Read more.
Background: Meditation is defined as a form of cognitive training that aims to improve attentional and emotional self-regulation. This systematic review aims to evaluate the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness and safety of mantra-based meditation techniques (MBM), in comparison to passive or active controls, or other active treatment, for the management of mental health symptoms. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO databases were consulted up to April 2021. Randomised controlled trials regarding meditation techniques mainly based on the repetition of mantras, such as transcendental meditation or others, were included. Results: MBM, compared to control conditions, was found to produce significant small-to-moderate effect sizes in the reduction of anxiety (g = −0.46, IC95%: −0.60, −0.32; I2 = 33%), depression (g = −0.33, 95% CI: −0.48, −0.19; I2 = 12%), stress (g = −0.45, 95% CI: −0.65, −0.24; I2 = 46%), post-traumatic stress (g = −0.59, 95% CI: −0.79, −0.38; I2 = 0%), and mental health-related quality of life (g = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.49; I2 = 0%). Conclusions: MBM appears to produce small-to-moderate significant reductions in mental health; however, this evidence is weakened by the risk of study bias and the paucity of studies with psychiatric samples and long-term follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop