Special Issue "Beat Generation Writers as Readers of World Literature"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hassan Melehy

Department of Romance Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB# 3170, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3170, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: European Renaissance; Poetics; Philosophy and Literature; Critical Theory; Film Studies; North American Literature

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scholarship increasingly recognizes the Beat Generation as far more than a movement restricted to the US. One of the reasons for worldwide interest in their work is that they understood literature as a global phenomenon: besides that they were well read in American and British literature, their own interests extended to the literatures of multiple European countries, North Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Although there is a long-standing tradition of characterizing their knowledge as meager and superficial, and their curiosity especially about non-Euro-American cultures as exoticizing and appropriative, recent research shows deeper, more sophisticated, more receptive engagements.

This special issue of Humanities seeks to explore the ways that Beat Generation writers read world literature and incorporated what they learned from it in their own writing. In this context, “literature” is broadly understood as also including philosophical texts, religious texts, and religious practices. Submissions on how Beat Generation writers contributed to the idea of literature as a global phenomenon are especially welcome.

Although as an open access journal Humanities normally charges authors a processing fee, there will be no cost for publication in this special issue.

Please submit articles of up to 8,000 words to Hassan Melehy ([email protected]) by 15 October 2018. Queries welcome.

Prof. Dr. Hassan Melehy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Beat Generation
  • Geographic Extensions
  • Transnational Beat Generation
  • Beat Generation Influence
  • Beat Generation Legacy
  • Beat Generation Literature

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Intertextuality in Diane di Prima’s Loba: Religious Discourse and Feminism
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040132
Received: 17 October 2018 / Revised: 8 December 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 16 December 2018
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Abstract
The last three decades have witnessed a significant increase in the academic interest in the Beat Generation. No longer seen as “know-nothing bohemians” (Podhoretz 1958), scholars have extended the scope of Beat studies, either by generating renewed interest in canonical authors, by expanding
[...] Read more.
The last three decades have witnessed a significant increase in the academic interest in the Beat Generation. No longer seen as “know-nothing bohemians” (Podhoretz 1958), scholars have extended the scope of Beat studies, either by generating renewed interest in canonical authors, by expanding the understanding of what Beat means, or by broadening the aesthetic or theoretical lens through which we read Beat writers and poets. Among these, the transnational perspective on Beat writing has sparked careful re-examinations of Beat authors and their works that seek to recognize, among other things, the impact that transnational cultures and literatures have had on Beat writers. Diane di Prima’s long poem Loba (Di Prima 1998), a feminist epic the poet started writing in the early 1970s, draws on a vast array of transnational texts and influences. Most notoriously, di Prima works with mythological and religious texts to revise and challenge the representation of women throughout history. This paper explores di Prima’s particular use of world narratives in light of a feminist poetics and politics of revision. Through the example of “Eve” and the “Virgin Mary”, two of the many female characters whose textual representation is challenged in Loba, the first part of the paper considers di Prima’s use of gnostic and Christian discourses and their impact on her feminist politics of revision. The second part of the paper situates Loba in the specific context of Second-Wave feminism and the rise of Goddess Movement feminist groups. Drawing from the previous analysis, this part reevaluates di Prima’s collection in light of the essentialist debate that analyzes the texts arising from this tradition as naïve and apolitical. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beat Generation Writers as Readers of World Literature)
Open AccessArticle Projective Verse: The Spiritual Legacy of the Beat Generation
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040102
Received: 25 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 22 October 2018
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Abstract
Allen Ginsberg’s poetry, poetics or cultural activism; Jack Kerouac’s prose, poetry and his method of composition; Gary Snyder’s environmental and Buddhist consciousness and bioregional ethos, or the opening made by the Beats for Eastern spirituality in the west are of intrinsic value and
[...] Read more.
Allen Ginsberg’s poetry, poetics or cultural activism; Jack Kerouac’s prose, poetry and his method of composition; Gary Snyder’s environmental and Buddhist consciousness and bioregional ethos, or the opening made by the Beats for Eastern spirituality in the west are of intrinsic value and will be for generations, this paper seeks to posit that it is Michael McClure’s use of Projective Verse, that future generations of writers and readers will come to appreciate as that movement’s spiritual legacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beat Generation Writers as Readers of World Literature)
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