Special Issue "Seismic Sequence in Mediterranean Region"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Geophysics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giovanni Lanzano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale Di Geofisica E Vulcanologia, Milan, Italy
Interests: ground motion predicton equations; strong motion records; residual analysis; non ergodic seismic hazard; ground motion variability; seismic engineering parameters
Dr. Stefano Pucci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata, 605, 00143 Roma, Italy
Interests: earthquake geology; tectonic geomorphology; quantitative geomorphology; geochronology; geophysics; paleoseismology; structural geology; geological mapping
Dr. Sara Sgobba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via A. Corti 12, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: empirical ground-motion models; engineering intensity measures; ground motion spatial prediction; near-source ground motion; selection and scaling of ground motion records; strong-motion accelerometric databases
Dr. Salvatore Grasso
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Architettura, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: seismic geotechnical engineering; geotechnical hazards; analysis of local seismic response and site effects; seismic microzonation; earthquake-induced landslides; land liquefaction under seismic conditions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Mediterranean is a very seismically active region due to its tectonic setting being a boundary zone between African and European plates. It is also a densely populated area with consequent high seismic risk exposure. In light of this, several studies have been focused on this region, largely improving upon the knowledge of Mediterranean seismicity and its seismic sources, as well as in the related ground motion analysis and modelling. Advances have also been produced on applied aspects, including the creation of new infrastructures for observation and monitoring (e.g., geodetic networks, data structures and repositories, etc.).

This Special Issue aims to cover these different topics with particular reference to the most recent sequences and events, such as in Italy, Greece, and Turkey. We encourage the submission of papers concerning topics such as:

  • Lessons learned from the past events;
  • Historical seismicity;
  • Seismotectonics and seismicity of the area;
  • Data acquisition and collection;
  • Analysis of the ground motion;
  • Seismic hazard assessment;
  • Risk and earthquake losses;
  • Developments in seismic design codes of countries in the Mediterranean area;
  • Tsunami and earthquake-induced hazard.

Dr. Giovanni Lanzano
Dr. Stefano Pucci
Dr. Sara Sgobba
Dr. Salvatore Grasso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active faults
  • historical earthquakes
  • geological data
  • geodetic data
  • seismological data
  • ground motion
  • seismic hazard
  • seismic risk
  • design code
  • earthquake-induced hazard

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Coseismic Ground Deformation Reproduced through Numerical Modeling: A Parameter Sensitivity Analysis
Geosciences 2019, 9(9), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9090370 - 25 Aug 2019
Abstract
Coseismic ground displacements detected through remote sensing surveys are often used to invert the coseismic slip distribution on geologically reliable fault planes. We analyze a well-known case study (2009 L’Aquila earthquake) to investigate how three-dimensional (3D) slip configuration affects coseismic ground surface deformation. [...] Read more.
Coseismic ground displacements detected through remote sensing surveys are often used to invert the coseismic slip distribution on geologically reliable fault planes. We analyze a well-known case study (2009 L’Aquila earthquake) to investigate how three-dimensional (3D) slip configuration affects coseismic ground surface deformation. Different coseismic slip surface configurations reconstructed using aftershocks distribution and coseismic cracks, were tested using 3D boundary element method numerical models. The models include two with slip patches that reach the surface and three models of blind normal-slip surfaces with different configurations of slip along shallowly-dipping secondary faults. We test the sensitivity of surface deformation to variations in stress drop and rock stiffness. We compare numerical models’ results with line of sight (LOS) surface deformation detected from differential SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry (DInSAR). The variations in fault configuration, rock stiffness and stress drop associated with the earthquake considerably impact the pattern of surface subsidence. In particular, the models with a coseismic slip patch that does not reach the surface have a better match to the line of sight coseismic surface deformation, as well as better match to the aftershock pattern, than models with rupture that reaches the surface. The coseismic slip along shallowly dipping secondary faults seems to provide a minor contribution toward surface deformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Sequence in Mediterranean Region)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of the Seismic Site Amplification in the City of Ivanec (NW Part of Croatia) Using the Microtremor HVSR Method and Equivalent-Linear Site Response Analysis
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070312 - 14 Jul 2019
Abstract
The city of Ivanec is located between valley of the Bednja River and Mt. Ivanščica and this area can be prone to significant seismic site amplification due to local site characteristics. This study presents the first assessment of seismic site amplification for the [...] Read more.
The city of Ivanec is located between valley of the Bednja River and Mt. Ivanščica and this area can be prone to significant seismic site amplification due to local site characteristics. This study presents the first assessment of seismic site amplification for the city of Ivanec by the microtremor horizontal-to-vertical-spectral-ratio (HVSR) method and the equivalent-linear (EQL) site response analysis. Based on microtremor measurements and HVSR analysis, fundamental soil frequency and HVSR peak amplitude maps indicate potentially seismic danger zones. The 1-D EQL site response analysis was performed using multiple suites of earthquake ground motions scaled to the 95- and 475-year return periods of peak ground accelerations. Site amplification maps at the predominant peak frequency and ground surface indicate two microzones, one with high amplification in the central part of the city due to soft soil characteristics, and the other with small amplification in the transitional zone from alluvial basin towards the foothills of Mt. Ivanščica. HVSR peak amplitudes and site response peak amplifications showed similar spatial distributions with similar predominant peak frequencies but with different amplitude levels. Site amplification maps provided significant information about potential resonance effects for structures of certain heights that can be correlated with the local ground shaking characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Sequence in Mediterranean Region)
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