Special Issue "Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anja Forche
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME, USA
Interests: genome plasticity; host-fungus interaction; stress adaptation; aneuploidy
Dr. Anna Selmecki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University​ Medical School, Omaha, NE, USA
Interests: aneuploidy, polyploidy, evolution, drug resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be a collection of review articles on genome plasticity across human and plant pathogenic fungi. Contributions to this issue will shed light on genome diversity and how it contributes to adaptation and evolution in diverse fungi. We welcome contributions on 1) genomic diversity within and between species or populations; 2) mechanisms of genotypic and phenotypic diversity; 3) how specific traits are influenced by genome plasticity; and 4) the role of genome plasticity on the adaptation and evolution of fungi. A special emphasis will be placed on how fungus–host interactions are shaped by fungal genome plasticity. We welcome reviews that compare genome plasticity mechanisms between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and between human and plant pathogenic fungi. Our goal is to connect genomics research on human and plant pathogenic fungi and to broaden interdisciplinary discussions on these topics.

Dr. Anja Forche
Dr. Anna Selmecki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fungal pathogens
  • Genome plasticity
  • Genome diversity
  • Ascomycetes
  • Basidiomycetes
  • Aneuploidy
  • Recombination
  • Loss of heterozygosity
  • Repeat loci
  • Chromosomes
  • Accessory chromosomes
  • Episomes
  • • Adaptation
  • Pathogenicity
  • Drug resistance
  • Commensalism

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Mitotic Recombination and Adaptive Genomic Changes in Human Pathogenic Fungi
Genes 2019, 10(11), 901; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10110901 - 07 Nov 2019
Abstract
Genome rearrangements and ploidy alterations are important for adaptive change in the pathogenic fungal species Candida and Cryptococcus, which propagate primarily through clonal, asexual reproduction. These changes can occur during mitotic growth and lead to enhanced virulence, drug resistance, and persistence in [...] Read more.
Genome rearrangements and ploidy alterations are important for adaptive change in the pathogenic fungal species Candida and Cryptococcus, which propagate primarily through clonal, asexual reproduction. These changes can occur during mitotic growth and lead to enhanced virulence, drug resistance, and persistence in chronic infections. Examples of microevolution during the course of infection were described in both human infections and mouse models. Recent discoveries defining the role of sexual, parasexual, and unisexual cycles in the evolution of these pathogenic fungi further expanded our understanding of the diversity found in and between species. During mitotic growth, damage to DNA in the form of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is repaired, and genome integrity is restored by the homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining pathways. In addition to faithful repair, these pathways can introduce minor sequence alterations at the break site or lead to more extensive genetic alterations that include loss of heterozygosity, inversions, duplications, deletions, and translocations. In particular, the prevalence of repetitive sequences in fungal genomes provides opportunities for structural rearrangements to be generated by non-allelic (ectopic) recombination. In this review, we describe DSB repair mechanisms and the types of resulting genome alterations that were documented in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The relevance of similar recombination events to stress- and drug-related adaptations and in generating species diversity are discussed for the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
To Repeat or Not to Repeat: Repetitive Sequences Regulate Genome Stability in Candida albicans
Genes 2019, 10(11), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10110866 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
Genome instability often leads to cell death but can also give rise to innovative genotypic and phenotypic variation through mutation and structural rearrangements. Repetitive sequences and chromatin architecture in particular are critical modulators of recombination and mutability. In Candida albicans, four major classes [...] Read more.
Genome instability often leads to cell death but can also give rise to innovative genotypic and phenotypic variation through mutation and structural rearrangements. Repetitive sequences and chromatin architecture in particular are critical modulators of recombination and mutability. In Candida albicans, four major classes of repeats exist in the genome: telomeres, subtelomeres, the major repeat sequence (MRS), and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Characterization of these loci has revealed how their structure contributes to recombination and either promotes or restricts sequence evolution. The mechanisms of recombination that give rise to genome instability are known for some of these regions, whereas others are generally unexplored. More recent work has revealed additional repetitive elements, including expanded gene families and centromeric repeats that facilitate recombination and genetic innovation. Together, the repeats facilitate C. albicans evolution through construction of novel genotypes that underlie C. albicans adaptive potential and promote persistence across its human host. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Chromatin-Mediated Regulation of Genome Plasticity in Human Fungal Pathogens
Genes 2019, 10(11), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10110855 - 28 Oct 2019
Abstract
Human fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans, are a public health problem, causing millions of infections and killing almost half a million people annually. The ability of these pathogens to colonise almost every organ in the [...] Read more.
Human fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans, are a public health problem, causing millions of infections and killing almost half a million people annually. The ability of these pathogens to colonise almost every organ in the human body and cause life-threating infections relies on their capacity to adapt and thrive in diverse hostile host-niche environments. Stress-induced genome instability is a key adaptive strategy used by human fungal pathogens as it increases genetic diversity, thereby allowing selection of genotype(s) better adapted to a new environment. Heterochromatin represses gene expression and deleterious recombination and could play a key role in modulating genome stability in response to environmental changes. However, very little is known about heterochromatin structure and function in human fungal pathogens. In this review, I use our knowledge of heterochromatin structure and function in fungal model systems as a road map to review the role of heterochromatin in regulating genome plasticity in the most common human fungal pathogens: Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
The Mechanisms of Mating in Pathogenic Fungi—A Plastic Trait
Genes 2019, 10(10), 831; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10100831 - 21 Oct 2019
Abstract
The impact of fungi on human and plant health is an ever-increasing issue. Recent studies have estimated that human fungal infections result in an excess of one million deaths per year and plant fungal infections resulting in the loss of crop yields worth [...] Read more.
The impact of fungi on human and plant health is an ever-increasing issue. Recent studies have estimated that human fungal infections result in an excess of one million deaths per year and plant fungal infections resulting in the loss of crop yields worth approximately 200 million per annum. Sexual reproduction in these economically important fungi has evolved in response to the environmental stresses encountered by the pathogens as a method to target DNA damage. Meiosis is integral to this process, through increasing diversity through recombination. Mating and meiosis have been extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, highlighting that these mechanisms have diverged even between apparently closely related species. To further examine this, this review will inspect these mechanisms in emerging important fungal pathogens, such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus. It shows that both sexual and asexual reproduction in these fungi demonstrate a high degree of plasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
A Double-Edged Sword: Aneuploidy is a Prevalent Strategy in Fungal Adaptation
Genes 2019, 10(10), 787; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10100787 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Aneuploidy, a deviation from a balanced genome by either gain or loss of chromosomes, is generally associated with impaired fitness and developmental defects in eukaryotic organisms. While the general physiological impact of aneuploidy remains largely elusive, many phenotypes associated with aneuploidy link to [...] Read more.
Aneuploidy, a deviation from a balanced genome by either gain or loss of chromosomes, is generally associated with impaired fitness and developmental defects in eukaryotic organisms. While the general physiological impact of aneuploidy remains largely elusive, many phenotypes associated with aneuploidy link to a common theme of stress adaptation. Here, we review previously identified mechanisms and observations related to aneuploidy, focusing on the highly diverse eukaryotes, fungi. Fungi, which have conquered virtually all environments, including several hostile ecological niches, exhibit widespread aneuploidy and employ it as an adaptive strategy under severe stress. Gambling with the balance between genome plasticity and stability has its cost and in fact, most aneuploidies have fitness defects. How can this fitness defect be reconciled with the prevalence of aneuploidy in fungi? It is likely that the fitness cost of the extra chromosomes is outweighed by the advantage they confer under life-threatening stresses. In fact, once the selective pressures are withdrawn, aneuploidy is often lost and replaced by less drastic mutations that possibly incur a lower fitness cost. We discuss representative examples across hostile environments, including medically and industrially relevant cases, to highlight potential adaptive mechanisms in aneuploid yeast. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome plasticity of human and plant pathogenic fungi)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop