Special Issue "Heraldry and Coats of Arms"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Bruce Durie

Genealogist, Author, Broadcaster, Lecturer; Academician, Académie Internationale de Généalogie
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Scottish Genealogy; Scottish Diaspora; Palaeography; 17th & 18th Century documents; Genetic Genealogy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Genealogy is a scholarly, peer-reviewed Journal in our field, produced by international academic publishers MDPI (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy). Dr Bruce Durie is one of the Founding Editorial Board members, and has agreed to edit a Special Issue: Heraldry and Coats of Arms.

As an active scholar in this field, you are invited to submit a proposal for an article of interest to the academic and interest-group communities worldwide.

Genealogy follows the Open Access pay-to-publish, free-to-read formula now common across all academic disciplines. However, the publication fee is to be waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted in 2018.

Those who wish to submit to this Special Issue should first send a short Statement of Interest to the Guest Editor Dr. Bruce Durie by the end of June 2018, with a brief description of the planned manuscript: email [email protected]

Bearing in mind that this publication will reach a different audience from those who attend Heraldic conferences or read the literature produced by Heraldic Societies etc., there is an opportunity to expand the scope away from the more traditional targets.

Some potential areas of focus might include the following, although all submissions are welcome and encouraged:

  • The Politics of Heraldry and the uses of Arms for political purposes
  • The concept of ‘Nobility’ in different heraldic jurisdictions
  • The Sociology of Heraldry – do class and status matter?
  • Adherence to Heraldic Law in jurisdictions with no Heraldic Authorities
  • Historic Heraldry
  • Education for Heraldry
  • Is Heraldry merely “the floral border of History” or does it have a more meaningful place in scholarship?
  • Recent changes to Heraldic Law and Practice in Scotland (or indeed elsewhere)

In addition, anyone will to act as a Reviewer for submitted papers is welcome to be in touch.

There are general Instructions for Authors at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy/instructions

Dr. Bruce Durie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heraldry
  • Heraldic
  • Armorial
  • Arms
  • Blazon

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
From Heraldry to Genealogy from Silverware
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 22 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
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Abstract
A Coat of Arms engraved on a piece of silverware allowed the identification of the parties concerned, and the elucidation of the details of their marriage and ancestries. The Arms themselves have an interesting provenance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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Open AccessArticle
The Coats of Arms and Other Forms of State Emblem Proposed for the Republic of Macedonia, and the Process of Their Adoption, 1992–2014
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 21 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
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Abstract
Selecting national emblems is crucial for the development of a national identity. This paper presents all official proposals for the coat of arms of the Republic of Macedonia, starting in 1992, with the proposals of the public competition for the selection of the [...] Read more.
Selecting national emblems is crucial for the development of a national identity. This paper presents all official proposals for the coat of arms of the Republic of Macedonia, starting in 1992, with the proposals of the public competition for the selection of the coat of arms, flag, and anthem of the Republic of Macedonia, and finishing with the last Government proposal in 2014. All of the proposals are categorized according to their main symbol, a sun or a lion. The long and complex process of creating national symbols shows that there is a deep division regarding which one to use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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Open AccessArticle
The Shields that Guard the Realms of Men: Heraldry in Game of Thrones
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 6 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
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Abstract
The vast popularity of the Game of Thrones franchise has drawn a new and diverse audience to the fantasy genre. Within the pseudo-medieval world created by G.R.R. Martin, a great deal of detail has gone into establishing coats of arms for the characters [...] Read more.
The vast popularity of the Game of Thrones franchise has drawn a new and diverse audience to the fantasy genre. Within the pseudo-medieval world created by G.R.R. Martin, a great deal of detail has gone into establishing coats of arms for the characters and families that are depicted. These arms fulfill an extremely important role, both within the arc of the story and as part of the marketing collateral of this very successful series. This article examines the role of arms in the Game of Thrones universe and explores how the heraldic system transcends the usual genealogical display and functions more as a type of familial branding. An exploration of some of the practices and idiosyncrasies of heraldry in the franchise shows that whilst Martin sets his foundation firmly in the traditional, he then extends this into the fanciful; in much the same manner as he does with other faux-historical aspects of his work. This study is valuable because Game of Thrones has brought heraldry from being a niche interest to something that is now consumed by a global audience of hundreds of millions of people. Several of the fantasy blazons in the series are now arguably the most recognisable coats of arms in history. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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Open AccessArticle
Social Structure and Aristocratic Representation—Red Wax Seal Usage in Hungary in the 15th c
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 18 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 22 October 2018
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Abstract
One might perceive the Middle Ages as an era of certain rights and privileges. Social stratification or the conformation of a group’s identity were all established around privileges in the Kingdom of Hungary. In the medieval period, as opposed to a modern state, [...] Read more.
One might perceive the Middle Ages as an era of certain rights and privileges. Social stratification or the conformation of a group’s identity were all established around privileges in the Kingdom of Hungary. In the medieval period, as opposed to a modern state, the most important constructors of a group’s identity were privileges. When members of a social group bear identical prerogatives, that group can be recognized as an order or estate. The ecclesiastic order existed side-by-side with the noble estate. In possession of political power were strictly those who were at the top of the strongly hierarchical system. However, in the Kingdom of Hungary, the significance of the ecclesiastical order was dwarfed by the importance of landed nobility. Some five percent of the population was of nobles, who also held political power. Until the end of the 15th century, the members of this stratum were equal in law. Only distinctions in financial situation can be noticed during the 14th and 15th centuries. The first law differentiating the rights within nobility was enacted by the national assembly, the diet of Wladislaus II (1490–1516), in 1498. Only from then on can we speak of gentry and aristocracy. This almost two-century-long process can be observed by examining a representational tool, the usage of red wax in seals. Upon studying medieval Hungarian history, we must use all sources available due to their rapid destruction, hence examining seal usage to explain aristocratic representation. In this paper, we briefly summarize the social structure of medieval Hungary and its traditions in seal usage, and present several unique seals. Our goal is to highlight some connections that historiography would benefit from, to provide new data, and to arouse the interest of a broad spectrum of audiences in Hungarian social history. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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Open AccessArticle
The Remains of Arnau de Torroja, 9th Grand Master of the Knights Templar, Discovered in Verona
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
The members of the Torroja family were extremely important as advisers on political and military strategy to the counts of Barcelona (monarchs of the Crown of Aragon) Arnaldo was elected Grand Master of the Knights Templar (1181–1184). On 30 September 1184, the Templar [...] Read more.
The members of the Torroja family were extremely important as advisers on political and military strategy to the counts of Barcelona (monarchs of the Crown of Aragon) Arnaldo was elected Grand Master of the Knights Templar (1181–1184). On 30 September 1184, the Templar Master passed away in the city of Veneto; Arnaldo de Torroja was buried at the church of San Vitale in Verona. The church was destroyed when the river Adige flooded it in the 18th century, and it was closed down in 1760 as a result of the damage caused. Some years ago, behind a wall, a sarcophagus was discovered on which was carved the typical Templar cross (Cross patty) and, in 2016, it was opened by a team of Italian scientists. The skeletal remains corresponded to the age Arnaldo. Thanks to the book that I recently published “Armorial de los Obispos de Barcelona, siglos XII–XXI”, it has been realized that the sarcophagus of the brother of Arnaldo of Torroja, Guillermo is contained within the Family heraldry “Golden a castle of Gules”, they requested that the aforementioned bishop’s remains be analysed, in order to compare them with those of Arnaldo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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Open AccessArticle
The Beauchamps of Warwick and Their Use of Arms
Received: 29 July 2018 / Revised: 16 September 2018 / Accepted: 17 September 2018 / Published: 22 September 2018
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Abstract
Coats of arms have, from their first appearance, been one of the primary visual expressions of a person’s lineage and indirectly of status. Individual members of a lineage had a choice: They could use the arms adopted by an ancestor with or without [...] Read more.
Coats of arms have, from their first appearance, been one of the primary visual expressions of a person’s lineage and indirectly of status. Individual members of a lineage had a choice: They could use the arms adopted by an ancestor with or without a mark of difference; or they could adopt one of their own design. Several systems for marking difference have been described, but evidence for a family tradition is usually sparse and spotty. The factors and forces limiting a choice are not known. The use of arms by the broader family of the Beauchamp, Earls of Warwick, is an example of how different branches used primary changes of design, as well as the use of smallish figures for secondary difference. The variants of the Beauchamp arms have previously been presented, but only documented in select individual cases. In this article, the problems of evidence, description, and assignment are discussed, in relation to anonymous or similar named individuals of different branches and generations. Seals and entries in armorials are reviewed, and marks of difference used by, or attributed to, individuals are documented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heraldry and Coats of Arms)
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