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Special Issue "Water Cycling and Drought Responses of Forest Ecosystems"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rafael Poyatos

CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès, 08193 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34935814678
Interests: drought, ecosystem function, forest ecology, functional ecology, plant hydraulics, transpiration
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Cleiton Breder Eller

University of Exeter, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, EX4 4QE, UK
E-Mail
Interests: drought, plant ecophysiology, plant hydraulics, process-based models, sap flux
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Virginia Hernandez-Santana

Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla (IRNAS), 41012 Sevilla, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: water stress, stomatal conductance, plant transpiration, plant ecophysiology, plant hydraulics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests control the magnitude and spatio-temporal patterns of terrestrial evaporative fluxes and, therefore, constitute one of the main drivers of the global water cycle. Water is also essential for forest functioning and hence drought triggers a myriad of responses in forests, from physiological and structural adjustments to demographic and composition changes. Forests worldwide are vulnerable to drought and, at the same time, biosphere–atmosphere feedbacks mediated by forests greatly influence ecosystem water availability. This Special Issue invites submissions linking forest water cycling and drought responses from stand to regional scales. We especially encourage approaches combining multiple data streams: Plant and ecosystem water fluxes (i.e., gas exchange, sap flux, eddy flux), plant traits, catchment water balance, forest inventories and remote sensing data. Data-driven approaches can also make use of existing databases to address questions at large spatial scales or to synthesize the ecological variation in water use strategies across forest species. We also welcome modelling studies that increase our mechanistic understanding and provide global change trajectories of forest evapotranspiration, drought vulnerability and ecosystem water availability. We expect to bring together contributions at the crossroads of plant physiology, ecology, hydrology, and soil and atmospheric sciences to provide a novel, multidisciplinary view on the relationship between forests and water.

Dr. Rafael Poyatos
Dr. Cleiton Breder Eller
Dr. Virginia Hernandez-Santana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evapotranspiration
  • plant hydraulics
  • precipitation recycling
  • soil moisture
  • stomatal regulation
  • transpiration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Drought Differentially Affects Growth, Transpiration, and Water Use Efficiency of Mixed and Monospecific Planted Forests
Forests 2019, 10(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020153
Received: 4 January 2019 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 11 February 2019
PDF Full-text (3174 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Drought conditions may have differential impacts on growth, transpiration, and water use efficiency (WUE) in mixed species and monospecific planted forests. Understanding the resistance (i.e., the capacity to maintain processes unchanged) of different tree species to drought, and how resistance is affected by [...] Read more.
Drought conditions may have differential impacts on growth, transpiration, and water use efficiency (WUE) in mixed species and monospecific planted forests. Understanding the resistance (i.e., the capacity to maintain processes unchanged) of different tree species to drought, and how resistance is affected by complementary interactions within species mixtures, is particularly important in the seasonally dry tropics where projected increases in the frequency and severity of drought threaten tree planting efforts and water resources. Complementary interactions between species may lead to more resistant stands if complementarity leads to greater buffering capacity during drought. We examined growth, transpiration, and WUE of mixtures and monocultures of Terminalia amazonia (J.F. Gmel.) Exell and Dalbergia retusa Hemsl. before and during a prolonged drought using intensive measurements of tree sap flow and growth. Tree sapwood area growth was highest for T. amazonia in mixtures during normal (6.78 ± 4.08 mm2 yr−1) and drought (7.12 ± 4.85 mm2 yr−1) conditions compared to the other treatments. However, stand sapwood area growth was greatest for T. amazonia monocultures, followed by mixtures, and finally, D. retusa monocultures. There was a significant decrease in stand transpiration during drought for both mixtures and T. amazonia monocultures, while Dalbergia retusa monocultures were most water use efficient at both the tree and stand level. Treatments showed different levels of resistance to drought, with D. retusa monocultures being the most resistant, with non-significant changes of growth and transpiration before and during drought. Combining species with complementary traits and avoiding combinations where one species dominates the other, may maximize complementary interactions and reduce competitive interactions, leading to greater resistance to drought conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Cycling and Drought Responses of Forest Ecosystems)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Interannual and Seasonal Variations in Ecosystem Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency in a Tropical Rainforest
Forests 2019, 10(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010014
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 24 December 2018 / Published: 26 December 2018
PDF Full-text (4447 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Warmer and drier climates over Amazonia have been predicted for the next century with expected changes in regional water and carbon cycles. We examined the impact of interannual and seasonal variations in climate conditions on ecosystem-level evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) [...] Read more.
Warmer and drier climates over Amazonia have been predicted for the next century with expected changes in regional water and carbon cycles. We examined the impact of interannual and seasonal variations in climate conditions on ecosystem-level evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) to determine key climatic drivers and anticipate the response of these ecosystems to climate change. We used daily climate and eddyflux data recorded at the Guyaflux site in French Guiana from 2004 to 2014. ET and WUE exhibited weak interannual variability. The main climatic driver of ET and WUE was global radiation (Rg), but relative extractable water (REW) and soil temperature (Ts) did also contribute. At the seasonal scale, ET and WUE showed a modal pattern driven by Rg, with maximum values for ET in July and August and for WUE at the beginning of the year. By removing radiation effects during water depleted periods, we showed that soil water stress strongly reduced ET. In contrast, drought conditions enhanced radiation-normalized WUE in almost all the years, suggesting that the lack of soil water had a more severe effect on ecosystem evapotranspiration than on photosynthesis. Our results are of major concern for tropical ecosystem modeling because they suggest that under future climate conditions, tropical forest ecosystems will be able to simultaneously adjust CO2 and H2O fluxes. Yet, for tropical forests under future conditions, the direction of change in WUE at the ecosystem scale is hard to predict, since the impact of radiation on WUE is counterbalanced by adjustments to soil water limitations. Developing mechanistic models that fully integrate the processes associated with CO2 and H2O flux control should help researchers understand and simulate future functional adjustments in these ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Cycling and Drought Responses of Forest Ecosystems)
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