E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Young-Seuk Park

Department of Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: community ecology; invasive species; biological monitoring; ecosystem health assessment; conservation biology; global change; ecological modelling; ecological informatics
Guest Editor
Dr. Won Il Choi

National Institute of Forest Science, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change; entomology; ecological modeling; forest pests; population dynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest pests and diseases are severe disturbance factors in forest ecosystems. Forest pests and diseases have diverse negative impacts on the forestry economy, ecosystem service, biodiversity, and sustainable ecosystem management. Many forest pests and diseases are related with invasive species in many countries. To reduce their impacts, various management programs have been implemented by many countries around the world. Monitoring their occurrence and the assessment of their impacts are a first step to effectively manage forest pests and diseases. It provides basic knowledge about forest pests and diseases, as well as proper management methods. In particular, long-term monitoring programs for forest pests and diseases offer insights about forest pests and diseases with the aid of proper analysis tools. Moreover, the long-term data can provide clues to understand the influence of disturbances, such as climate change and invasive species on forest ecosystems. Based on the data from monitoring programs, new methods for monitoring, assessing impacts, and developing management techniques could be developed. An ecological model is an effective methodology for the management of forest pests and diseases. It can be used for providing information that is required for decision making through hazard ratings, the examination of potential impacts, and the prediction of dispersal patterns for forest pests and diseases. From academic points of view, it can also simulate the natural conditions to understand the cause of occurrence and decline of forest pests and diseases in ecosystems and evaluate the influence of various environmental factors on forest pests and diseases, and its effects on ecosystems. To provide a better understanding of the structure and processes in the forest ecosystems, and to provide fundamental information for effective management of forest pests and diseases, this Special Issue will accept studies from broad research topics related to impacts, monitoring, and management of forest pests and diseases, including case studies, methods, theories, and models.

Prof. Dr. Young-Seuk Park
Dr. Won Il Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alien species
  • Forest pathogens
  • Forest pest insects
  • Hazard rating
  • Impacts of forest pests and diseases
  • Modelling approach
  • Monitoring for forests pests and diseases
  • Occasional pests and diseases
  • Pest management
  • Risk assessment

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Initial Location Preference Together with Aggregation Pheromones Regulate the Attack Pattern of Tomicus brevipilosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Pinus kesiya
Forests 2019, 10(2), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020156
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2314 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research Highlights: We found that the initial attack location together with the aggregation pheromones played an important role in mediating the aggressive behavior of T. brevipilosus on P. kesiya. Background and Objectives: T. brevipilosus was identified as an aggressive species, which possesses [...] Read more.
Research Highlights: We found that the initial attack location together with the aggregation pheromones played an important role in mediating the aggressive behavior of T. brevipilosus on P. kesiya. Background and Objectives: T. brevipilosus was identified as an aggressive species, which possesses the ability to kill live, healthy P. kesiya. In this scenario, we study the top-down attack pattern of T. brevipilosus on P. kesiya during the entirety of the reproductive period. Materials and Methods: We investigated the phenology of trunk attack on P. kesiya over a period of three years in Pu’er City, China. The hindguts extracts of the females and males T. brevipilosus were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The candidate aggregation pheromone compounds of T. brevipilosus were determined through electrophysiology experiments (electroantennographic detection, EAD and electroantennography, EAG), laboratory olfactometer bioassays, and field trapping. Results: we found that the pioneer beetles preferentially infested the crown of P. kesiya at the early stage of attack following spring flight with the later arriving beetles selectively attacking the lower area of the trunk to avoid intraspecific competition and better utilize limited resources, which exhibits a top-down attack pattern. During gallery initiation, the beetles release aggregation pheromones to attract conspecifics to conduct a mass attack. The chemical analyses indicated that the hindgut extracts of gallery-initiating beetles contained a larger amount of myrtenol, cis-verbenol, trans-verbenol, and verbenone. Myrtenol and trans-verbenol were identified as candidate aggregation pheromone compounds. In addition, a blend of these two components with S-(−)-α-pinene and S-(−)-β-pinene attracted more T. brevipilosus individuals in a field bioassay. Conclusions: We concluded that the preference for the initial attack location together with the aggregation pheromones played an important role in mediating the top-down attack pattern of T. brevipilosus on P. kesiya. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Calcium and Potassium Imbalance Favours Leaf Blight and Defoliation Caused by Calonectria pteridis in Eucalyptus Plants
Forests 2018, 9(12), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9120782
Received: 26 October 2018 / Revised: 30 November 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 18 December 2018
PDF Full-text (3960 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The supply of nutrients in balanced proportions leads to greater crop yields and represents an alternative practice for the management of plant diseases. Accordingly, we investigated the effect of the doses of and the nutritional balance between calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) on [...] Read more.
The supply of nutrients in balanced proportions leads to greater crop yields and represents an alternative practice for the management of plant diseases. Accordingly, we investigated the effect of the doses of and the nutritional balance between calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) on the severity of leaf spot and defoliation caused by the fungus Calonectria pteridis. Moreover, the effect of the treatments on the growth of interspecific hybrid eucalyptus clone seedlings (Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden × E. urophylla S.T. Blake), which are highly susceptible to the disease, was evaluated. The 25 treatments comprised combinations of one of five doses of Ca (1.2, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 mmol L−1) with one of five doses of K (0.8, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 12.0 mmol L−1) and five replicates of each treatment were included in the study. The supply of high concentrations of K favoured C. pteridis infection and resulted in high disease severity, although defoliation was not observed. However, the supply of both nutrients in excess (12.0 mmol L−1 Ca × 9.0 mmol L−1 K) resulted in a higher disease severity and an increased defoliation percentage (82 and 64%, respectively). Defoliation not associated with Calonectria leaf blight disease was observed with the imbalanced treatments, that is, the treatments combining a low concentration of one nutrient and an excess concentration of the other nutrient. The supply of K at a level near the standard dose (6 mmol L−1) and of Ca at a dose above 4 mmol L−1 (standard dose) ensured high mean values for the morphological variables root and shoot biomass, plant height and chlorophyll a and b contents. These treatments also resulted in low disease severity and defoliation percentages, indicating that a balanced supply of Ca and K ensures reductions in disease severity and defoliation and contributes to higher growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Use of qPCR Reveals a High Frequency of Phytophthora quercina in Two Spanish Holm Oak Areas
Forests 2018, 9(11), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9110697
Received: 17 October 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 10 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1050 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The struggling Spanish holm oak woodland situation associated with Phytophthora root rot has been studied for a long time. Phytophthora cinnamomi is considered the main, but not the only species responsible for the decline scenario. This study verifies the presence and/or detection of [...] Read more.
The struggling Spanish holm oak woodland situation associated with Phytophthora root rot has been studied for a long time. Phytophthora cinnamomi is considered the main, but not the only species responsible for the decline scenario. This study verifies the presence and/or detection of Phytophthora species in two holm oak areas of Spain (southwestern “dehesas” and northeastern woodland) using different isolation and detection approaches. Direct isolation and baiting methods in declining and non-declining holm oak trees revealed Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora gonapodyides, Phytophthora megasperma, and Phytophthora pseudocryptogea in the dehesas, while in the northeastern woodland, no Phytophthora spp. were recovered. Statistical analyses indicated that there was not a significant relationship between the Phytophthora spp. isolation frequency and the disease expression of the holm oak stands in the dehesas. Phytophthora quercina and P. cinnamomi TaqMan real-time PCR probes showed that both P. cinnamomi and P. quercina are involved in the holm oak decline in Spain, but P. quercina was detected in a higher frequency than P. cinnamomi in both studied areas. Thus, this study demonstrates that molecular approaches complement direct isolation techniques in natural and seminatural ecosystem surveys to determine the presence and distribution of Phytophthora spp. This is the first report of P. pseudocryptogea in Europe and its role in the holm oak decline should be further studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Comparing Methods for Monitoring Establishment of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis, Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Egg Parasitoid Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) in Maryland, USA
Forests 2018, 9(10), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100659
Received: 18 September 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 22 October 2018
PDF Full-text (1499 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB), is an invasive beetle that has caused widespread mortality of ash trees in North America. To date, four parasitoids have been introduced in North America for EAB biological control, including the egg parasitoid Oobius agrili [...] Read more.
The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB), is an invasive beetle that has caused widespread mortality of ash trees in North America. To date, four parasitoids have been introduced in North America for EAB biological control, including the egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang & Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). Monitoring EAB egg parasitism is challenging because female beetles oviposit in bark crevices and EAB eggs and O. agrili are small (<1 mm in diameter). Consequently, multiple methods have been developed to recover this parasitoid. Here we compared two methods, visual surveys and bark sifting, used to monitor establishment of O. agrili in Maryland, USA. From 2009 to 2015, a total of 56,176 O. agrili were released at 32 sites across the state. In 2016, we surveyed nine of the study sites for O. agrili establishment using both methods. We compared the amount of time spent searching for eggs separately in each method, and also analyzed the effects of years-post release, total number of parasitoids released, and median month of release, on percent parasitism of EAB eggs, and the percentage of trees per site with parasitized EAB eggs. We found that visually surveying ash trees for EAB eggs was more efficient than bark sifting; the percent parasitism observed using the two methods was similar, but visually surveying trees was more time-efficient. Both methods indicate that O. agrili can successfully establish populations in Maryland, and June may be the best month to release O. agrili in the state. Future research should investigate EAB phenology in the state to help optimize parasitoid release strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Abiotic and Biotic Disturbances Affecting Forest Health in Poland over the Past 30 Years: Impacts of Climate and Forest Management
Forests 2019, 10(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010075
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 18 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
PDF Full-text (2532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The current nature of forest management in Poland reflects its history and more than 100 years of economic activity affecting forests since independence in 1918. Before that time, different forest management models were used, related to the nature of the Prussian economy in [...] Read more.
The current nature of forest management in Poland reflects its history and more than 100 years of economic activity affecting forests since independence in 1918. Before that time, different forest management models were used, related to the nature of the Prussian economy in the north of the country, the Russian economy in the central-eastern part, and the Austrian economy in south-eastern Poland. The consequence of these management models, as well as the differing climate zones in which they were used, resulted in varied forest health. Since the end of World War II, forest coverage within Poland‘s new borders has increased from 20.8% to currently 29.6%, mainly as a result of afforestation of wastelands and former agricultural lands. This paper describes changes in the health of forests and their biological diversity in Poland in the context of weather extremes, species composition, forest management, the forest industry, and damage from insects and pathogenic fungi over the last 30 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts, Monitoring and Management of Forest Pests and Diseases)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


 

Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top