Special Issue "Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Tree Crops Biodiversity"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Gaetano Distefano Website E-Mail
Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Università degli Studi di Catania, Alimentazione e Ambiente (Di3A), Sez. Arboricoltura e Genetica agraria, Via Valdisavoia 5 - 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: tree crop biotechnology; tree crop genomics; transgenics; biodiversity evaluation and analysis; fruit tree crops breeding; reproductive biology on fruit crops

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Tree Crop Biodiversity

The last few years have seen a dramatic increase in the use of DNA-derived data and innovative phenotyping to obtain insights into the causative genes underlying traits of agronomical interest, or to characterize the tree genetic resources. The latter, in particular, could represent an important source of genetic diversity that can be readily used to enhance the adaptability to limiting environmental factors and resistance to biotic stresses, or to promote novel genotypes with improved agronomic traits. Studies may focus on different aspects—such as species relationship and evolution, the extent and distribution of diversity in crop and forestry species, accession identity and detection of novel variants—providing valuable information for germplasm management and the prevention of genetic erosion. In particular, the use of molecular markers could have direct positive implications for the genetic characterization of tree germplasm resources, laying a foundation for the use of genetic polymorphisms to make predictions of phenotype changes through marker–trait association analysis. The paucity of the available phenotypic data, with respect to genetic, is still an important limiting factor, and the linking of genotypic and phenotypic information remains one of the greatest challenges in current genetics research.

On the whole, studies on tree crop biodiversity could provide the essential building blocks to ensure future improvements in production and quality, and for innovations in tree crop development and utilization.

Assoc. Prof. Gaetano Distefano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genetic resources
  • molecular markers
  • germplasm
  • agronomic trait
  • conservation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bark Features for Identifying Resonance Spruce Standing Timber
Forests 2019, 10(9), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10090799 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
Measuring the acoustic properties of wood is not feasible for most luthiers, so identifying simple, valid criteria for diagnosis remains an exciting challenge when selecting materials for manufacturing musical instruments. This article aims to verify whether the bark qualities as a marker of [...] Read more.
Measuring the acoustic properties of wood is not feasible for most luthiers, so identifying simple, valid criteria for diagnosis remains an exciting challenge when selecting materials for manufacturing musical instruments. This article aims to verify whether the bark qualities as a marker of resonance wood are indeed useful. The morphometric and colour traits (in CIELab space) of the bark scales were compared with the structural (width and regularity of the growth rings and of the latewood) and acoustic features (transverse sound velocity, radiation ratio, impedance, and wood basic density) of the wood from 145 standing and 10 felled spruce trees, which are considered a resource of the resonance wood in the Romanian Carpathians. It has been emphasized that the spruce trees with acoustic and structural features that match the requirements for the manufacture of violins have a bark phenotype distinguishable by colour (higher redness, lower yellowness and brightness)—as well as by scale shape (higher slenderness and width). The south-facing side of the trunk and the external side of the scale are best for identifying resonance trees by their bark. Additionally, the mature bark phenotypes denote topoclinal variations and do not depend on tree age. Moreover, the differences among bark phenotypes are noticeable to the naked eye. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Tree Crops Biodiversity)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Tea Germplasm for Its Management and Sustainable Use in Korea Genebank
Forests 2019, 10(9), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10090780 - 08 Sep 2019
Abstract
Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) is cultivated in many developing Asian, African, and South American countries, and is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. It is of critical importance to understand the genetic diversity and population structure of tea [...] Read more.
Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) is cultivated in many developing Asian, African, and South American countries, and is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. It is of critical importance to understand the genetic diversity and population structure of tea germplasm for effective collection, conservation, and utilization. In this study, 410 tea accessions collected from South Korea were analyzed using 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Among 410 tea accessions, 85.4% (350 accessions) were collected from Jeollanam-do. A total of 286 alleles were observed, and the genetic diversity and evenness were estimated to be on average 0.79 and 0.61, respectively, across all the tested samples. Using discriminant analysis of principal components, four clusters were detected in 410 tea accessions. Among them, cluster 1 showed a higher frequency of rare alleles (less than 1%). Using the calculation of the index of association and rbaD value, each cluster showed a clonal mode of reproduction. The result of analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that most of the variation observed was within populations (99%) rather than among populations (1%). The present study revealed the presence of lower diversity and simpler population structure in Korean tea germplasms. Consequently, more attention should be focused on collecting and conserving the new tea individuals to broaden genetic variation of new cultivars in future breeding of the tea plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Tree Crops Biodiversity)
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