Special Issue "Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stacy L. Clark
Website
Guest Editor
USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, 274 Ellington Plant Sci, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
Interests: American chestnut, artificial regeneration, nursery production, oak regeneration, seedling quality, silviculture
Dr. Daniel C. Dey
Website
Co-Guest Editor
USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
Interests: fire effects; oak; pine; prescribed fire; regeneration; restoration; silviculture; wildlife interactions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Planned silvicultural disturbances such as harvesting, prescribed fire, and herbicide application alter successional pathways to achieve restoration and regeneration goals. Restoration is the process of recovering degraded ecosystems often within the context of an historical condition as a reference point for the desired future condition. Poor land-use practices, invasive non-native species, and climate change have all contributed to degrade and damage forest ecosystems that are now in need of restoration. Regeneration can be an important goal when applying silvicultural treatments for ecological restoration, such as maintaining or transitioning towards a specific species composition or increasing biodiversity. Experiments designed to quantify and model outcomes of planned disturbance events are lacking, particularly studies that are replicated at the stand level.

This Special Issue of Forests is focused on how silvicultural practices can achieve ecological restoration or regeneration goals. Research articles may focus on stand-level silvicultural treatments and their effects on restoration parameters such as vegetation composition, stand structure, tree growth, or wildlife species populations or use. Articles can focus on how silvicultural treatments affect forest health or mitigate the effects of climate change in degraded or damaged stands. Articles evaluating silvicultural treatment impacts on regeneration, either natural or artificial, are welcome. Articles can address basic questions, such as effects on water uptake or physiological conditions of regeneration. Applied research, such as how economic outcomes and timber quality are affected by restoration or regeneration treatments, are also welcome.

Dr. Stacy L. Clark
Dr. Daniel C. Dey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Degradation
  • Desired future condition
  • Disturbance
  • Ecological restoration
  • Regeneration harvesting
  • Silvicultural treatments

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microsite Influence on Woody Plant Regeneration in a Pinus palustris Woodland Following Catastrophic Disturbance
Forests 2020, 11(5), 588; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050588 (registering DOI) - 23 May 2020
Abstract
Information and material biological legacies that persist after catastrophic forest disturbance collectively constitute the ecological memory of the system and may strongly influence future stand development. Catastrophic disturbances often result in an influx of coarse woody debris (CWD), and this material legacy may [...] Read more.
Information and material biological legacies that persist after catastrophic forest disturbance collectively constitute the ecological memory of the system and may strongly influence future stand development. Catastrophic disturbances often result in an influx of coarse woody debris (CWD), and this material legacy may provide beneficial microsites that affect successional and structural developmental pathways. We examined how microenvironmental characteristics influence the regeneration of woody plants in a subtropical woodland that experienced a large influx of CWD from a catastrophic wind disturbance. Specifically, we asked (1) what microenvironmental factors best explain woody plant density, richness, and height in the regeneration layer and (2) does woody plant density, richness, and height benefit from the large influx of CWD to a degree that competition dynamics and succession may be modified? Data were collected in a Pinus palustris woodland that had experienced an EF3 tornado and was subjected to a four-year prescribed fire rotation. We documented live woody plants <5 cm diameter at breast height, soil, and site characteristics and tested for differences in seedling and sapling density, species richness, and height in relation to CWD proximity. We used a random forest machine learning algorithm to examine the influence of microenvironmental conditions on the characteristics of woody plants in the regeneration layer. Woody plant density and species richness were not significantly different by proximity to CWD, but plants near CWD were slightly taller than plants away from CWD. The best predictors of woody plant density, richness, and height were abiotic site characteristics including slope gradient and azimuth, organic matter depth and weight, and soil water content. Results indicated that the regeneration of woody plants in this P. palustris woodland was not strongly influenced by the influx of CWD, but by other biological legacies such as existing root networks and soil characteristics. Our study highlights the need to consider ecological memory in forest management decision-making after catastrophic disturbance. Information and material legacies shape recovery patterns, but, depending on the system, some legacies will be more influential on successional and developmental pathways than others. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Restoration of Shortleaf Pine (Pinus echinata)-Hardwood Mixtures in Low Quality Mixed Upland Hardwood Stands Using Cluster Planting and Natural Regeneration
Forests 2020, 11(4), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040457 - 17 Apr 2020
Abstract
Cluster planting of shortleaf pine, along with various site preparation and release treatments, were tested to restore mixed shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.)–hardwood stands in areas where the shortleaf pine has diminished in recent years. Shortleaf pine–hardwood mixtures were once a common [...] Read more.
Cluster planting of shortleaf pine, along with various site preparation and release treatments, were tested to restore mixed shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.)–hardwood stands in areas where the shortleaf pine has diminished in recent years. Shortleaf pine–hardwood mixtures were once a common forest type throughout the Cumberland Mountains and Plateau physiographic regions of the southeastern United States. Knowledge of how to restore shortleaf pine–hardwood mixtures is limited throughout shortleaf pine’s large native range. The objectives of this study were to compare planted shortleaf pine and natural hardwood regeneration survival, growth, and composition following various site preparation and early release treatments. Cluster planting and partial timber harvesting were used to reintroduce shortleaf pine and create two-aged stands in the Cumberland Mountains of Tennessee, USA. Results indicated that shortleaf pine survival, basal diameter, and height growth did not differ following four growing seasons among treatments. Natural regeneration stem densities and heights within shortleaf pine clusters did not differ significantly by treatment. Natural regeneration stem densities differed by species group and height class across the site, while the treatment × species interaction term was also significant. At this early stage of stand development, the brown-and-burn treatment appears poised for greater shortleaf pine growth rates than the other treatments. The herbicide treatment had the fewest regenerating hardwoods per hectare and the most desirable hardwood species composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Differential Early Performance of Two Underplanted Hardwood Tree Species Following Restoration Treatments in High-Graded Temperate Rainforests
Forests 2020, 11(4), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040401 - 03 Apr 2020
Abstract
Raulí (Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl.)) and Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) are mid-tolerant tree species in the Coihue-Raulí-Tepa (ca. 0.55 mill ha) and Evergreen (ca. 4.1 mill ha) forest types in south-central Chile, respectively. These species have been selectively logged in [...] Read more.
Raulí (Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl.)) and Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) are mid-tolerant tree species in the Coihue-Raulí-Tepa (ca. 0.55 mill ha) and Evergreen (ca. 4.1 mill ha) forest types in south-central Chile, respectively. These species have been selectively logged in old-growth forests especially during the 20th century, Raulí mostly for its highly valuable timber, and Ulmo for its highly demanded firewood and bark for the tannery industry. Natural regeneration of these species occurs mostly through canopy gaps, but it can be retarded, or even inhibited, when the cover of the understory vegetation becomes unusually dense, such as in high-graded forests. Although underplanting is possible for these species, the knowledge about their growth in forest understories is scarce, and necessary to inform restoration programs. Therefore, we evaluated short-term responses (two years) of underplanted containerized seedlings in root-collar diameter, height, stem volume, and in the slenderness index, as a function of canopy openness (%, continuous variable) and three restoration treatments (categorical variables, plus one control treatment) at two different sites with high-graded old-growth forests for each forest type. By using generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) we determined that Raulí was more sensitive to the influence of both canopy openness and restoration treatments, while Ulmo was mostly influenced by canopy openness. Specifically, Raulí was positively influenced by canopy openness and restoration treatments in all response variables except for the slenderness index. Conversely, Ulmo was influenced by canopy openness in all response variables except the slenderness index, which was influenced by both predictor variables (canopy openness and restoration treatments). Thus, prospects for restoration with these species are discussed, including possible ontogenetic changes in their responses to light that may demand continuous silvicultural operations to recover the productive and functional roles of these species in these forest ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Strategies for Modeling Regeneration Density in Relation to Distance from Adult Trees
Forests 2020, 11(1), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11010120 - 19 Jan 2020
Abstract
Research Highlights: We proposed new methodologies for the spatial analysis of regeneration processes and compared with existing approaches. Background and Objectives: Identifying the spatial relationship between adult trees and new cohorts is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of regeneration and therefore helps us [...] Read more.
Research Highlights: We proposed new methodologies for the spatial analysis of regeneration processes and compared with existing approaches. Background and Objectives: Identifying the spatial relationship between adult trees and new cohorts is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of regeneration and therefore helps us to optimize the stand density and natural regeneration when undertaking regeneration fellings. Most of the statistical approaches analyzing the spatial dependence between adult trees and new individuals (seedlings or saplings) require a complete census and mapping of all individuals. However, approaches considering individuals grouped into sampling points or subplots (i.e., density data) are limited. In this study, we reviewed and compared approaches (intertype point pattern analyses and a generalized additive model) to describe the spatial relationship between adult trees and density regeneration in a Pinus sylvestris L. monospecific stand in Spain. We also proposed a new approach (intertype mark variance function) to disentangle the effect of the tree-size on sapling density and the effect of the spatial pattern. Materials and Methods: To this end, we used a half-hectare plot in which all the individuals of P. sylvestris have been mapped and measured. Results: Our results indicated that sapling distribution was related to distance from the adult trees, thus displaying distance-dependence patterns, but it was not related to the size of the adult trees. The intertype mark correlation function was an useful tool to distinguish the effect of the marks (sapling density and tree size) from the effect of the spatial pattern of the classes (trees cohorts in our case). Conclusions: The largest number of saplings was found with increased distance between adult trees (>11 m), and the generalized additive model may be useful to explain spatial relationships between adult trees and regenerating cohorts when other measured biotic variables (e.g., soil stoniness, etc.) and repeated measurements are available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Hardwood Species Show Wide Variability in Response to Silviculture during Reclamation of Coal Mine Sites
Forests 2020, 11(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11010072 - 07 Jan 2020
Abstract
Coal is a significant energy source for the United States, and reclamation of surface mined lands is required under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Reforestation of mined lands is challenging due to soil substrate properties including soil compaction, herbaceous [...] Read more.
Coal is a significant energy source for the United States, and reclamation of surface mined lands is required under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Reforestation of mined lands is challenging due to soil substrate properties including soil compaction, herbaceous competition, and animal browse, necessitating silvicultural treatments to help overcome such limiting factors. We investigated the field performance of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), and swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.) planted on two mine reclamation sites in southern Indiana, USA, and evaluated the interactions of nursery stocktypes (container and bareroot), herbicide application, and tree shelters. Two-year survival averaged 80% across all species and stocktypes. Container stocktype had greater relative height and diameter growth (i.e., relative to initial size at planting), whereas bareroot had greater absolute height and diameter growth corresponding to initial stocktype differences. Shelter use increased height growth and reduced diameter growth across both stocktypes. Swamp white oak (Q. bicolor) had the highest survival rate and field performance regardless of silvicultural treatment, whereas red oak (Q. rubra) and black walnut (J. nigra) showed strong early regeneration responses to silvicultural treatments. Container seedlings showed promise as an alternative to bareroot seedlings to promote early growth on mine reclamation sites. Species-specific responses documented here indicate the need to consider the ecology and stress resistance of target species in developing cost-effective silvicultural prescriptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silviculture for Restoration and Regeneration)
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