Special Issue "The Scientific Basis of the Target Plant Concept"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anthony S. Davis
Website
Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Interests: seedling quality; nursery production; forest and rangeland restoration; international development
Dr. Jeremiah R. Pinto
Website
Guest Editor
USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Moscow, ID 83843, USA
Interests: seedling and plant physiology; environmental biophysics; ecophysiology; nursery production

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reforestation and restoration using nursery-produced seedlings is often the most reliable way to ensure the successful establishment and rapid growth of native plants. Seedling establishment success depends greatly on decisions and considerations made prior to planting, and yet seedlings are often grown without full consideration of the intended outplanting site and conditions. The best seedling can vary greatly from site to site depending on environmental conditions and objectives, but when strategies align limiting factors and mitigating measures, successful attainment of the objectives of the planting project—be it reforestation or restoration—can be increased. The Target Plant Concept is an effective framework for selecting seedlings and other types of plant material based on specific characteristics best-suited to a given site. These characteristics are often scientifically derived from testing the factors that can be linked to outplanting success, such as seedling morphology and physiology, genetic source, and overcoming limiting factors on outplanting sites. The articles contained in this Special Issue will focus on the latest science that shapes how seedlings can be grown and paired with outplanting techniques to meet objectives and accelerate reforestation and restoration trajectories.

Dr. Anthony S. Davis
Dr. Jeremiah R. Pinto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Seedling physiology
  • Seedling quality
  • Genetics
  • Outplanting
  • Field performance
  • Stocktype
  • Nursery production

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Herbivory and Competing Vegetation Interact as Site Limiting Factors in Maritime Forest Restoration
Forests 2019, 10(11), 950; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110950 - 25 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Herbivory and competition during the regeneration phase influence forest successional dynamics. We demonstrated the importance of using the Target Plant Concept to identify and overcome site limiting factors for subtropical maritime forest restoration associated with deer browsing and competition. Quercus virginiana Mill. (live [...] Read more.
Herbivory and competition during the regeneration phase influence forest successional dynamics. We demonstrated the importance of using the Target Plant Concept to identify and overcome site limiting factors for subtropical maritime forest restoration associated with deer browsing and competition. Quercus virginiana Mill. (live oak) bareroot seedlings were planted into clearcuts along the US Southern Atlantic coast with different treatment combinations of herbivory control (fenced or non-fenced) against white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimm.) browsing and competing vegetation removal (none, one-year, or two-years). After three growing seasons, mean seedling survival was 61% with no significant treatment differences. Control of browse and vegetation interacted to facilitate growth of live oak; seedlings were significantly larger for all response parameters (diameter, height, crown width) when fenced and treated with vegetation control. Removal of vegetation improved seedling performance only in fenced plots, however, indicating a shift in pressure from herbivory to competition as the most limiting site factor when deer were excluded. After the second growing season, foliar nitrogen was greater in fenced plots than non-fenced plots and greater in two-year vegetation control subplots than non-vegetation control subplots. This result, however, was absent after the third growing season. Three years after clearcutting, there was no evidence of Q. virginiana natural regeneration in non-fenced plots. Even with artificial regeneration in non-fenced plots, Q. virginiana growth was slow, indicating that herbivory was a key limiting factor. Our findings illustrate the importance of accounting for site limiting factors and may aid in developing management prescriptions to promote semi-evergreen oak regeneration in ecosystems with high pressure from herbivory and competing vegetation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Scientific Basis of the Target Plant Concept)
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Open AccessArticle
Multivariate Discriminant Analysis of Single Seed Near Infrared Spectra for Sorting Dead-Filled and Viable Seeds of Three Pine Species: Does One Model Fit All Species?
Forests 2019, 10(6), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10060469 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Seed lots of pine species are composed of viable, dead-filled and empty seeds, and the success of complete sorting of dead-filled seeds using the conventional method (Incubation, Drying and Separation in water) is difficult to achieve; leaving a considerable scope for upgrading the [...] Read more.
Seed lots of pine species are composed of viable, dead-filled and empty seeds, and the success of complete sorting of dead-filled seeds using the conventional method (Incubation, Drying and Separation in water) is difficult to achieve; leaving a considerable scope for upgrading the sorting efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prospect of sorting viable and dead-filled seeds of pine species using Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. To demonstrate this, dead-filled and viable seeds of Mason’s pine, slash pine and loblolly pine were incubated in moist medium for three days, dried for six hours and scanned by XDS Rapid Content Analyzer from 780–2500 nm. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure-Discriminant Analysis was used to develop discriminant models for each species separately and for all species combined. The results showed that the sensitivity (the model’s ability to correctly classify members of a given class) and the specificity (the model’s ability to reject non-members of a given class) were 100% for each species model and 98%–99% for combined species model. The overall classification accuracy was 100% and 99% for individual species and combined species models, respectively. The absorption band in the 1870–1950 nm with a major peak at 1930 nm, which is related to water, was responsible for discrimination as dead-filled seeds dried quicker than viable seeds during the drying process. Our study is the first attempt to simultaneously discriminate dead-filled and viable seeds of pines by NIR spectroscopy. The results demonstrates that a global calibration model of seed lots of several pine species can be equally effective as the individual species model to discriminate viable and dead-filled seeds by NIR spectroscopy, thereby ensuring precision sowing (also known as single seed sowing) in nurseries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Scientific Basis of the Target Plant Concept)
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