Special Issue "Control and Management of Invasive Species in Forest Ecosystems"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Holuša
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
Interests: Sawflies; Pathogens of barkbeetles; Invasive species; IPM; Conservation Biology; Forest ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive species, such as weeds, animals, and micro-organisms, are a major issue that threatens ecosystems, habitats, and forests. Expansion of either the true range or the outbreak range has been observed in several model species/groups of major insect guilds in boreal and temperate biomes. Effects of climate change on forest insects have been demonstrated for a number of species and guilds, although generalizations of the available results are difficult to make because of species-specific responses to climate change.

Invasive species are a global problem. Many of the species cause problems, including economic losses, so we should focus on helping to manage them. The monitoring of invasive species is necessary. Controlling invasive species can be problematic, as the chemical and mechanical management options are often ineffective in the long-term, impractical, prohibitively costly, or even illegal. Biological control is a sustainable alternative way to control invasive species.

Therefore, this Special Issue will concentrate on the monitoring, control, and management of invasive species in forests to help authorities make optimal decisions.

Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Holuša
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • invasive species
  • non-native species
  • monitoring
  • species traits
  • competition
  • biological control

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Community Attributes Predict the Relationship between Habitat Invasibility and Land Use Types in an Agricultural and Forest Landscape
Forests 2019, 10(10), 867; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100867 - 03 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Finding ecosystem or community level indicators for habitat invasibility may provide natural resource managers with environmentally friendly measures to control alien plant invasion; yet, ecosystem invasibility remains understudied. Here, we investigated alien plant invasion into various ecosystems representing different land use types in [...] Read more.
Finding ecosystem or community level indicators for habitat invasibility may provide natural resource managers with environmentally friendly measures to control alien plant invasion; yet, ecosystem invasibility remains understudied. Here, we investigated alien plant invasion into various ecosystems representing different land use types in a subtropical peri-urban area of south China. Four invasive alien species were found from five out of the six ecosystems. Lower plant diversity in both the overstory and understory was consistently associated with more severe alien plant invasion to the ecosystems. The highest total abundance and plot occurrence of the invasive plants were found in the agroforestry ecosystem representing the highest disturbance. At plot scale, an increase in invasion severity was associated with a significant decrease in overstory stem density, species richness, and diversity, but with a significant increase in overstory plant dominance. The understory community attributes in response to the increase in invasion severity followed similar patterns, except that the stem density increased with invasion severity. Higher canopy openness and thus lower leaf area index and greater understory radiation were associated with higher invasion severity of invasive plants to the understory habitat. For predicting total abundance of the invasive species, the most important variable is land use type, while for the abundance of Lantana camara and Mikania micrantha, the most important predictor variable is overstory Berger–Parker index and canopy openness, respectively. Canopy structure and understory gap light regimes were among the most important factors determining the abundance of the worst invasive plant Mikania micrantha. Our results demonstrate that land use types with varying disturbance regimes determine the spatial heterogeneity in plant diversity and community structure, which predicts alien plant invasion and habitat invasibility; and that the severity of alien plant invasion in turn is a good indicator of habitat disturbance across the ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control and Management of Invasive Species in Forest Ecosystems)
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