New Insights into Enhancing the Quality and Shelf-Life of Meat and Meat Analogs

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 11859

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
Interests: food processing and process technology; preservation technology; quality of meat and meat analogues; temperature control preservation technology; natural preservatives for meat analogs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, a lot of research has been conducted on technologies related to replacing animal-derived foods with food-based products all over the world. Meat products as the major source of high-protein food have increased concerns relating to environmental impacts, animal welfare issues, and public health. Plant proteins possess the potential to replace meat, leading us to develop plant-based meat analogs. Both academic and global industrial research groups are focused on developing plant-based alternatives to conventional animal products. In addition, there is little research on the preservation technology focused on meat analogs in a point of view of low temperature or ambient temperature and with the addition of preservatives regarding the quality of meat or meat analogs.

In this Special Issue of Foods, we encourage submitting manuscripts focused on all aspects of the meat quality or meat analogs’ quality, including topics such as the development of plant protein sources, the functional properties and structural characteristics of plant proteins, the formulations and optimization of processing conditions using extrusion technology, sensory attributes and nutrient characteristics of meat analogs, the nutritional advantages and disadvantages of meat analogs, product safety consciousness and consumer acceptance, and challenges and perspectives for nonmeat products, temperature control preservation technology of meat analogs, such as freezing, retort, sterilization process, and so on.

Our aim is to gather all the new information in this field and include it in the Special Issue entitled, “New Insights into Enhancing the Quality and Shelf-life of Meat and Meat Analogs”. We invite researchers to contribute original and unpublished research and review articles on this topic.

Dr. Mi-Jung Choi
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • food processing and process technology
  • preservation technology
  • quality of meat and meat analogues
  • temperature control preservation technology
  • natural preservatives for meat analogues

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 20901 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Potential of Full-Fat Soy as an Alternative Ingredient in the Manufacture of Low- and High-Moisture Meat Analogs
by Yung-Hee Jeon, Bon-Jae Gu and Gi-Hyung Ryu
Foods 2023, 12(5), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12051011 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2153
Abstract
The increase in meat consumption could adversely affect the environment. Thus, there is growing interest in meat analogs. Soy protein isolate is the most common primary material to produce low- and high-moisture meat analogs (LMMA and HMMA), and full-fat soy (FFS) is another [...] Read more.
The increase in meat consumption could adversely affect the environment. Thus, there is growing interest in meat analogs. Soy protein isolate is the most common primary material to produce low- and high-moisture meat analogs (LMMA and HMMA), and full-fat soy (FFS) is another promising ingredient for LMMA and HMMA. Therefore, in this study, LMMA and HMMA with FFS were manufactured, and then their physicochemical properties were investigated. The water holding capacity, springiness, and cohesiveness of LMMA decreased with increasing FFS contents, whereas the integrity index, chewiness, cutting strength, degree of texturization, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content of LMMA increased when FFS contents increased. While the physical properties of HMMA decreased with the increasing FFS content, its DPPH free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic contents increased. In conclusion, when full-fat soy content increased from 0% to 30%, there was a positive influence on the fibrous structure of LMMA. On the other hand, the HMMA process requires additional research to improve the fibrous structure with FFS. Full article
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21 pages, 3039 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant, Organoleptic and Physicochemical Changes in Different Marinated Oven-Grilled Chicken Breast Meat
by Charles Odilichukwu R. Okpala, Szymon Juchniewicz, Katarzyna Leicht, Małgorzata Korzeniowska and Raquel P. F. Guiné
Foods 2022, 11(24), 3951; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11243951 - 07 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1863
Abstract
The antioxidant, organoleptic, and physicochemical changes in different marinated oven-grilled chicken breast meat were investigated. Specifically, the chicken breast meat samples were procured from a local retailer in Wroclaw, Poland. The antioxidant aspects involved 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazolin-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power [...] Read more.
The antioxidant, organoleptic, and physicochemical changes in different marinated oven-grilled chicken breast meat were investigated. Specifically, the chicken breast meat samples were procured from a local retailer in Wroclaw, Poland. The antioxidant aspects involved 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazolin-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). The organoleptic aspects involved sensory and texture aspects. The physicochemical aspects involved the pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), cooking weight loss, L* a* b* color, and textural cutting force. Different marination variants comprised incremental 0.5, 1, and 1.5% concentrations of Baikal skullcap (BS), cranberry pomace (CP), and grape pomace (GP) that depicted antioxidants, and subsequently incorporated either African spice (AS) or an industrial marinade/pickle (IM). The oven grill facility was set at a temperature of 180 °C and a constant cooking time of 5 min. Results showed various antioxidant, organoleptic and physicochemical range values across the different marinated oven-grilled chicken breast meat samples, most of which appeared somewhat limited. Incorporating either AS or IM seemingly widens the ABTS and FRAP ranges, with much less for the DPPH. Moreover, with increasing CP, GP, and BS concentrations, fluctuations seemingly persist in pH, TBARS, cooking weight loss, L* a* b* color, and textural cutting force values even when either AS or IM was incorporated, despite resemblances in some organoleptic sensory and texture profiles. Overall, the oven-grilling approach promises to moderate the antioxidant, organoleptic, and physicochemical value ranges in the different marinated chicken breast meat samples in this study. Full article
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13 pages, 4272 KiB  
Article
Effects of Glucono-δ-Lactone and Transglutaminase on the Physicochemical and Textural Properties of Plant-Based Meat Patty
by Haesanna Kim, Mi-Yeon Lee, Jiseon Lee, Yeon-Ji Jo and Mi-Jung Choi
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3337; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213337 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2379
Abstract
Due to growing interest in health and sustainability, the demand for replacing animal-based ingredients with more sustainable alternatives has increased. Many studies have been conducted on plant-based meat, but only a few have investigated the effect of adding a suitable binder to plant-based [...] Read more.
Due to growing interest in health and sustainability, the demand for replacing animal-based ingredients with more sustainable alternatives has increased. Many studies have been conducted on plant-based meat, but only a few have investigated the effect of adding a suitable binder to plant-based meat to enhance meat texture. Thus, this study investigated the effects of the addition of transglutaminase (TG) and glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) on the physicochemical, textural, and sensory characteristics of plant-based ground meat products. The addition of a high quantity of GdL(G10T0) had an effect on the decrease in lightness (L* 58.98) and the increase in redness (a* 3.62). TG and GdL also decreased in terms of cooking loss (CL) and water holding capacity (WHC) of PBMPs. G5T5 showed the lowest CL (3.8%), while G3T7 showed the lowest WHC (86.02%). The mechanical properties also confirmed that G3T7-added patties have significantly high hardness (25.49 N), springiness (3.7 mm), gumminess (15.99 N), and chewiness (57.76 mJ). The improved textural properties can compensate for the chewability of PBMPs. Although the overall preference for improved hardness was not high compared to the control in the sensory test, these results provide a new direction for improving the textural properties of plant-based meat by using binders and forming fibrous structures. Full article
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13 pages, 2656 KiB  
Article
Evolution of Sensory Properties of Beef during Long Dry Ageing
by Ellies-Oury Marie-Pierre, Grossiord Benoit, Denayrolles Muriel, Papillon Sandrine, Sauvant Patrick, Hocquette Jean-François and Aussems Emmanuel
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2822; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182822 - 13 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1384
Abstract
Ageing is an essential step in obtaining meat with satisfactory sensory properties. Dry-ageing, although being a niche practice, is increasingly being developed to enhance the taste experience of meat consumers. In this work, we studied the kinetics of the evolution of muscle properties [...] Read more.
Ageing is an essential step in obtaining meat with satisfactory sensory properties. Dry-ageing, although being a niche practice, is increasingly being developed to enhance the taste experience of meat consumers. In this work, we studied the kinetics of the evolution of muscle properties with increasing ageing time, in order to propose an optimal duration, allowing a compromise between quality and meat weight loss reduction. Our study was performed on 32 samples from 8 animals for which the Longissimus thoracis sensory properties were analysed at different stages of ageing (7, 16, 35 and 60-days post-slaughter). This work showed an increase in the dry matter content of meat with increasing ageing duration, concomitant with a slight increase in pH. Although the luminance of the meat is stabilized after 14-days, the red and yellow indices decrease until 35-days of ageing. Iron content also decreases with ageing duration. Finally, the kinetic evolution of muscle rheological properties indicates that the toughness decreases at least up to 35-days on raw meat. Cooking seems to homogenise the tenderness of the samples, no difference was noticed between the different ageing durations when meat was cooked. These first experimental data need to be confirmed with different animal types. Full article
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14 pages, 580 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Chitosan Coating Enriched with Free and Nanoencapsulated Satureja montana L. Essential Oil as a Novel Tool for Beef Preservation
by Natalija Đorđević, Ivana Karabegović, Dragoljub Cvetković, Branislav Šojić, Dragiša Savić and Bojana Danilović
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2733; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182733 - 06 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1455
Abstract
The effect of chitosan coating enriched with free and nanoencapsulated Satureja montana L. essential oil (EO) on microbial, antioxidant and sensory characteristics of beef was analyzed. Different concentrations of free Satureja montana L. EO (SMEO) and nanoparticles (CNPs) were added to chitosan coatings, [...] Read more.
The effect of chitosan coating enriched with free and nanoencapsulated Satureja montana L. essential oil (EO) on microbial, antioxidant and sensory characteristics of beef was analyzed. Different concentrations of free Satureja montana L. EO (SMEO) and nanoparticles (CNPs) were added to chitosan coatings, namely 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. The beef samples were immersed in the chitosan coatings and stored at +4 °C for 20 days. In this period, the changes in pH value, total viable count (TVC), lactic acid bacteria, psychrophilic bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were analyzed. The lipid oxidation of beef was determined by the TBAR assay, while sensory analysis was performed by means of the descriptive evaluation method. Generally, the influence of chitosan coating with CNPs on the growth of the tested microorganisms was more pronounced compared to SMEO. Treatment with coating enriched with 1% CNPs resulted in the reduction in TVC and Pseudomonas spp. by 2.4 and 3 log CFU/g, compared to the control, respectively. Additionally, all applied coatings with SMEO and CNPs resulted in the prolonged oxidative stability of the meat The addition of free SMEO created an unnatural aroma for the evaluators, while this odor was neutralized by nanoencapsulation. The durability of color, smell and general acceptability of beef was significantly increased by application of chitosane coatings with the addition of SMEO or SMEO-CNPs, compared to the control. This research indicates the potential application of enriched chitosan coatings in beef preservation in order to improve meat safety and prolong shelf-life. Full article
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10 pages, 927 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Superchilling and Supercooling on Extending the Fresh Quality of Beef Loin
by Honggyun Kim and Geun-Pyo Hong
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2729; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182729 - 06 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1752
Abstract
This study compared the effects of superchilling and supercooling preservations for 15 days on the freshness and quality characteristics of beef loin. Beef freshness was evaluated by total aerobic count (TAC), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and [...] Read more.
This study compared the effects of superchilling and supercooling preservations for 15 days on the freshness and quality characteristics of beef loin. Beef freshness was evaluated by total aerobic count (TAC), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and instrumental color, drip loss, cooking loss, and texture profile analysis (TPA) were determined as quality parameters. All assays were compared with fresh control and normal chilling conditions (4 °C). The mean preservation temperatures of superchilling and supercooling were −3.9 °C and −2.1 °C, respectively. The freshness parameters indicated that both superchilling and supercooling extended the freshness of beef loin for 15 days, while chilled beef could not maintain the standard of freshness conditions. For quality parameters, there was no difference between the control and supercooling treatments, whereas superchilling exhibited higher drip loss and toughness compared to the control (p < 0.05). Therefore, this study demonstrated that supercooling was the best preservation technique to extend the freshness and quality of beef loin, but superchilling was not suitable to guarantee the quality of beef. Full article
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