Special Issue "Infant and Child Nutrition and Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Nazanin Zand

Department of Life Sciences, University of Greenwich, Faculty of Engineering and Science at Medway, Chatham, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
E-Mail

Keywords

  • nutritional quality of infant and children’s food
  • micronutrient retention in food
  • innovation in developing food for growth
  • infant and child cognitive development and food
  • preventing obesity in childhood
  • parental influences in food quality of children
  • vegan diet during infancy and childhood
  • nutrient interaction and bio-availability
  • nutritional immunology during infancy
  • vitamin D in food during early life

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Analysis of Naturally Occurring Steroid Hormones in Infant Formulas by HPLC-MS/MS and Contribution to Dietary Intake
Foods 2015, 4(4), 605-621; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4040605
Received: 24 July 2015 / Revised: 15 October 2015 / Accepted: 16 October 2015 / Published: 22 October 2015
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Abstract
Milk is a natural fluid and as such contains small amounts of naturally occurring steroids. Human milk is recommended as the optimal source of nutrients for infants and young children, and it has been associated to several short- and long-term benefits. For this
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Milk is a natural fluid and as such contains small amounts of naturally occurring steroids. Human milk is recommended as the optimal source of nutrients for infants and young children, and it has been associated to several short- and long-term benefits. For this reason, its composition is used as a reference for designing infant formulas. However, the available information on the hormonal levels of these dairy products is scarce, and it is usually limited to estradiol and estrone. In the present study, six natural sex hormones (pregnenolone, progesterone, estrone, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone and androstenedione) have been extracted from sixteen milk-based infant formulas and analyzed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The purpose of this research was to quantify natural steroid hormones in various infant formulas, to provide food and nutrition practitioners with information to estimate intakes in children. In addition, data found in the literature was used for comparison. The findings suggest that there are certain similarities between bovine milk and dairy products for infants. Furthermore, the detected levels were in general lower than those observed in human milk and/or colostrum. The reported results represent a valuable addition to the current knowledge on natural hormone content of infant foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infant and Child Nutrition and Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Infant Milk Formulas: Effect of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Powdered Products towards Autoxidation
Foods 2015, 4(3), 487-500; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4030487
Received: 30 July 2015 / Revised: 8 September 2015 / Accepted: 15 September 2015 / Published: 22 September 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (568 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Thirty samples of powdered infant milk formulas containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been stored at four different temperatures (20, 28, 40 and 55 °C) and periodically monitored for their malondialdehyde (MDA) content up to one year. MDA levels ranged between 250 and
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Thirty samples of powdered infant milk formulas containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been stored at four different temperatures (20, 28, 40 and 55 °C) and periodically monitored for their malondialdehyde (MDA) content up to one year. MDA levels ranged between 250 and 350 ng/kg in sealed samples with a maximum of 566 ng/kg in samples stored at 28 °C for three weeks after opening of their original packages, previously maintained for ten months at 20 °C. Sample stored at 40° and 55 °C were also submitted to CIE (Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage) colorimetric analysis, since color is the first sensorial property that consumers may evaluate. Overall, the results demonstrated a good stability of PUFA-enriched infant milk formulas in terms of MDA content. However, some care has to be paid when these products are not promptly consumed and stored for a long time after first opening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infant and Child Nutrition and Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Iron Bioavailability and Provitamin A from Sweet Potato- and Cereal-Based Complementary Foods
Foods 2015, 4(3), 463-476; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4030463
Received: 15 July 2015 / Revised: 31 August 2015 / Accepted: 10 September 2015 / Published: 18 September 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (570 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Iron and vitamin A deficiencies in childhood are public health problems in the developing world. Introduction of cereal-based complementary foods, that are often poor sources of both vitamin A and bioavailable iron, increases the risk of deficiency in young children. Alternative foods with
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Iron and vitamin A deficiencies in childhood are public health problems in the developing world. Introduction of cereal-based complementary foods, that are often poor sources of both vitamin A and bioavailable iron, increases the risk of deficiency in young children. Alternative foods with higher levels of vitamin A and bioavailable iron could help alleviate these micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to compare iron bioavailability of β-carotene-rich sweet potato-based complementary foods (orange-flesh based sweet potato (OFSP) ComFa and cream-flesh sweet potato based (CFSP) ComFa with a household cereal-based complementary food (Weanimix) and a commercial cereal (Cerelac®), using the in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Iron bioavailability relative to total iron, concentrations of iron-uptake inhibitors (fibre, phytates, and polyphenols), and enhancers (ascorbic acid, ß-carotene and fructose) was also evaluated. All foods contained similar amounts of iron, but bioavailability varied: Cerelac® had the highest, followed by OFSP ComFa and Weanimix, which had equivalent bioavailable iron; CFSP ComFa had the lowest bioavailability. The high iron bioavailability from Cerelac® was associated with the highest levels of ascorbic acid, and the lowest levels of inhibitors; polyphenols appeared to limit sweet potato-based food iron bioavailability. Taken together, the results do not support that CFSP- and OFSP ComFa are better sources of bioavailable iron compared with non-commercial/household cereal-based weaning foods; however, they may be a good source of provitamin A in the form of β-carotene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infant and Child Nutrition and Foods)
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