Special Issue "Biosecurity in Meat and Poultry Production"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Elena González-Fandos
Website
Guest Editor
Food Technology Department, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, Rioja, Spain
Interests: campylobacter; poultry; Listeria; foodborne pathogens
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meat and poultry meat has frequently been associated with the transmission of foodborne pathogens, such as Salmonella and Campylobacter, among others. In order to prevent and control foodborne pathogens, biosecurity measures could play an important role.

Biosecurity is a set of preventative measures implemented to reduce the risk of transmission of infectious disease from reservoirs of the infectious agent to the target host (EFSA 2011).

Implementation of high levels of biosecurity at all stages of animal production and along the food chain is of great interest in order to reduce the incidence of foodborne diseases. Moreover, improvement in biosecurity could help to reduce veterinary drug use, and the consequent problems associated with antibiotics residues.

This Special Issue will discuss the role of biosecurity in food safety and the efficacy of biosecurity measures in the control of foodborne pathogens in meat and poultry production.

Dr. María Elena González-Fandos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosecurity
  • Food safety
  • Foodborne pathogens
  • Food control
  • Risk factors
  • Meat
  • Poultry

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Efficacy of Lactic Acid and Modified Atmosphere Packaging against Campylobacter jejuni on Chicken during Refrigerated Storage
Foods 2020, 9(1), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010109 - 20 Jan 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1419
Abstract
The present study was conducted to evaluate the combined effect of lactic acid washing and modified atmospheres packaging on the counts of Campylobacter jejuni on chicken legs stored at 4 °C. In experiment 1, inoculated chicken legs were washed with either 1% or [...] Read more.
The present study was conducted to evaluate the combined effect of lactic acid washing and modified atmospheres packaging on the counts of Campylobacter jejuni on chicken legs stored at 4 °C. In experiment 1, inoculated chicken legs were washed with either 1% or 2% lactic acid solution for 5 min or distilled water (control). The treatment with 2% lactic acid reduced C. jejuni counts 1.42 log units after treatment (day 0). In experiment 2, inoculated samples were packaged under different conditions: air, 100%N2, vacuum, 20%CO2/80%N2, or 40%CO2/60%N2. C. jejuni counts were higher in samples packaged under vacuum or atmospheres containing CO2 than in air. In experiment 3, inoculated chicken legs were washed with a 2% lactic acid solution for 5 min or distilled water (control). Samples were packaged under different conditions: air, vacuum, 20%CO2/80%N2, or 40%CO2/60%N2. C. jejuni counts were lower in samples treated with lactic acid than in samples non-treated. However, C. jejuni counts were higher in chicken legs treated with lactic acid and packaged in modified atmospheres than in those treated and packaged in air. Immersion of chicken legs in a solution containing 2% lactic acid can reduce C. jejuni counts on fresh chicken packaged in modified atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosecurity in Meat and Poultry Production)
Open AccessArticle
Prevalence, Virulence, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Campylobacter spp. in Raw Milk, Beef, and Pork Meat in Northern Poland
Foods 2019, 8(9), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090420 - 17 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1187
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine whether raw milk, unpasteurized dairy products, pork, and beef available for sale in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie and Wielkopolska regions in Poland are contaminated with Campylobacter spp. bacteria and may be a potential source of infection. For [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to determine whether raw milk, unpasteurized dairy products, pork, and beef available for sale in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie and Wielkopolska regions in Poland are contaminated with Campylobacter spp. bacteria and may be a potential source of infection. For isolated strains, antibiotic susceptibility and the presence of genes responsible for virulence were examined. Material for research included 1058 food samples collected between 2014 and 2018 with 454 samples of raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products (milk from vending machines, milk from owners of dairy cows, cheese, milk cream) and 604 samples of raw meat (pork, beef). The results indicated that 9.3% of the samples were positive for Campylobacter spp., and Campylobacter jejuni was predominant in this study. Campylobacter bacteria was not found in milk collected from vending machines, as well as cheese and milk cream samples. Campylobacter was noted in 12.7% of beef samples, 11.8% of raw milk purchased from individual suppliers, and 10.9% of pork samples. Resistance to erythromycin (2.0%), azithromycin (3.1%), gentamicin (4.1%), tetracycline (65.3%), and ciprofloxacin (71.4%) was determined using the disc diffusion method. Furthermore, the prevalence of racR, sodB, csrA, virB11, cdtB, iam, and wlaN genes were examined using the PCR method. The sodB, csrA, and cdtB genes exhibited the highest detection rate, but none of the genes were identified in 100% of the isolates. Statistically significant differences between the presence of virulence marker genes, including for iam, racR, and csrA markers, were noted among different sources of the isolates. Differences in the distribution of iam, wlaN, and virB11 were also shown between C. jejuni and C. coli strains. As a result of the analysis, it has been concluded that unpasteurized milk, beef, and pork could be a sources of Campylobacter pathogens. Moreover, this study revealed virulent properties of Campylobacter isolated from such food products and high resistance rates to fluoroquinolones, which may represent difficulties in campylobacteriosis treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosecurity in Meat and Poultry Production)
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