Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 34259

Special Issue Editor


grade E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IPOA Research Group, Agro-Food Technology Department, Instituto de Investigación e Innovación Agroalimentaria y Agroambiental (CIAGRO-UMH), Miguel Hernández University, Orihuela, 03312 Alicante, Spain
Interests: functional foods; dietary fiber; natural inhibitors; antioxidants; healthier meat products; essential oils; in vitro digestion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although meats and meat products are key dietary sources for many important nutrients, including protein and essential micronutrients (minerals and vitamins), their consumption is continuously decreasing due to the consumer concerns about health and the environment. For most new consumers, meat and meat products have a negative image. Their content in saturated fats and cholesterol and the use of some additives in the products’ formulas (mainly salt and nitrites) that can cause health problems are factors contributing to the consumer rejection. Bearing these considerations in mind, the meat industry has to make a big shift toward the development of healthier meat products. The substitution of saturated fats with unsaturated fats, the replacement of animal protein with plant-based ingredients, decreasing salt content, avoiding nitrite addition, adding dietary fiber, enrichment with bioactive compounds, or even the addition of coproducts from agro-industries are only a few examples of strategies that are under study in awakening consumer appeal. These reformulation strategies bring with them technological problems that must be solved by researchers in order to lead to successful products—all with the ultimate aim of ensuring that meat products can return to the diet of new and demanding generations with great concern for the environment and health.

Prof. Dr. Juana Fernández-López
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat products
  • health
  • unsaturated fats
  • nitrite
  • salt
  • plant-based ingredients
  • eco-friendly
  • reformulation
  • dietary fiber
  • bioactive compounds

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

9 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Commercial Meat Products of Red Chicken Reared under LED Lights
by Martina Colapietro, Andrea Ianni, Francesca Bennato and Giuseppe Martino
Foods 2022, 11(3), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030370 - 27 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1828
Abstract
The objective of our study was to investigate the role of three different light-color temperatures of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) [Neutral (K=33003700); Warm (K=30002500) and Cool (K=55006000 [...] Read more.
The objective of our study was to investigate the role of three different light-color temperatures of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) [Neutral (K=33003700); Warm (K=30002500) and Cool (K=55006000)] on the qualitative attributes of breast meat obtained from male AZ Extra Heavy Red chickens. The comparison was made with meat deriving from chickens reared in the presence of classic neon lighting (Control). The meat was analyzed for the determination of both physical and chemical properties (cooking loss, moisture, total lipids and fatty acid composition). Furthermore, meat samples subjected to cooking were also analyzed for the identification of volatile compounds produced during the process; such evaluation was performed both immediately after cooking (T0) and after 7 days (T7) of cooked-meat storage at 4 °C. Cooking-loss values were higher for samples from chickens raised with Neutral LED (p < 0.05) compared to the other groups. For the fatty acid profiles of the meat, higher values were found for monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) such as C18:1, C9 and C16:1 in Cool LED compared to the Control. Regarding the volatile profile of cooked meat, compounds belonging to the families of aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, and aromatic compounds were identified. Compounds belonging to the aldehyde family, such as hexanal, increased in Cool LED samples at T0 in comparison to the Control. On the other hand, the amounts of 1-Pentanol, 1-Octanol and 2-Octen-1-ol, which belong to the alcohol family, increased at T7 in Cool LED samples compared to the Warm LED. In conclusion, LED lighting showed to be effective in inducing significant variations on chicken breast meat ready to be introduced to the market, in particular regarding fatty acid profiles and the accumulation of volatile compounds. However more in-depth evaluation is needed for the identification of modifications regarding the sensorial sphere, which could have an impact on the consumer acceptability of the product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
12 pages, 1838 KiB  
Article
Design of an In Vitro Model to Screen the Chemical Reactivity Induced by Polyphenols and Vitamins during Digestion: An Application to Processed Meat
by Eléna Keuleyan, Aline Bonifacie, Philippe Gatellier, Claude Ferreira, Sylvie Blinet, Aurélie Promeyrat, Gilles Nassy, Véronique Santé-Lhoutellier and Laëtitia Théron
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2230; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092230 - 20 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2562
Abstract
Processed meats’ nutritional quality may be enhanced by bioactive vegetable molecules, by preventing the synthesis of nitrosamines from N-nitrosation, and harmful aldehydes from lipid oxidation, through their reformulation. Both reactions occur during digestion. The precise effect of these molecules during processed meats’ digestion [...] Read more.
Processed meats’ nutritional quality may be enhanced by bioactive vegetable molecules, by preventing the synthesis of nitrosamines from N-nitrosation, and harmful aldehydes from lipid oxidation, through their reformulation. Both reactions occur during digestion. The precise effect of these molecules during processed meats’ digestion must be deepened to wisely select the most efficient vegetable compounds. The aim of this study was to design an in vitro experimental method, allowing to foresee polyphenols and vitamins’ effects on the chemical reactivity linked to processed meats’ digestion. The method measured the modulation of end products formation (specific nitroso-tryptophan and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)), by differential UV-visible spectrophotometry, according to the presence or not of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, rutin, naringin, naringenin) or vitamins (ascorbic acid and trolox). The reactional medium was supported by an oil in water emulsion mimicking the physico-chemical environment of the gastric compartment. The model was optimized to uphold the reactions in a stable and simplified model featuring processed meat composition. Rutin, chlorogenic acid, naringin, and naringenin significantly inhibited lipid oxidation. N-nitrosation was inhibited by the presence of lipids and ascorbate. This methodology paves the way for an accurate selection of molecules within the framework of processed meat products reformulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Banana Pseudo-Stem Increases the Water-Holding Capacity of Minced Pork Batter and the Oxidative Stability of Pork Patties
by Diego E. Carballo, Irma Caro, Cristina Gallego, Ana Rebeca González, Francisco Javier Giráldez, Sonia Andrés and Javier Mateo
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2173; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092173 - 13 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3499
Abstract
Banana pseudo-stem (BPS), which is rich in fibre and polyphenols, is a potential functional ingredient for the food industry. In this study, BPS was added at concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 g/kg to a minced pork batter to evaluate its performance as [...] Read more.
Banana pseudo-stem (BPS), which is rich in fibre and polyphenols, is a potential functional ingredient for the food industry. In this study, BPS was added at concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 g/kg to a minced pork batter to evaluate its performance as a filler and to pork burger patties to evaluate its performance as a natural antioxidant. The effects of BPS were compared with those of carrageenan and ascorbate, which are a conventional binder and antioxidant, respectively. The performance of BPS was similar to that of carrageenan in terms of the cooking yield and texture of the cooked batter. BPS reduced the brightness of fresh patties and appeared to reduce oxidative discolouration during the frozen storage of raw patties. Moreover, BPS reduced the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) during the refrigerated and frozen storage of cooked patties. A greater decrease in TBARS formation was observed with 4.5 g BPS/kg compared with 0.5 g sodium ascorbate/kg during refrigerated storage. In contrast to ascorbate, BPS promoted the presence of lipid-derived volatile compounds induced by thermal breakdown in the headspace of cooked patties. Nonetheless, this effect was reduced as the amount of BPS in the patties increased. In cooked minced meat products, BPS could increase cooking yields and lipid oxidative stability during storage and might result in a more intense flavour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

7 pages, 574 KiB  
Communication
High-Frequency Focused Ultrasound on Quality Traits of Bovine Triceps brachii Muscle
by Reyes Omaro Caraveo-Suarez, Ivan Adrian Garcia-Galicia, Eduardo Santellano-Estrada, Luis Manuel Carrillo-Lopez, Mariana Huerta-Jimenez, Einar Vargas-Bello-Pérez and Alma Delia Alarcon-Rojo
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092074 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2053
Abstract
This aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-frequency focused ultrasound (HFFU) on quality traits of bovine Triceps brachii. Four treatments (0, 10, 20, and 30 min) of HFFU (2 MHz and 1.5 W/cm2) were applied to [...] Read more.
This aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-frequency focused ultrasound (HFFU) on quality traits of bovine Triceps brachii. Four treatments (0, 10, 20, and 30 min) of HFFU (2 MHz and 1.5 W/cm2) were applied to bovine T. brachii muscle. Immediately after treatment, evaluations of color, pH, drip loss, water holding capacity, and shear force in meat were undertaken. The application of HFFU slightly decreased (p < 0.05) the redness of meat. In addition, a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the shear force of meat was observed after the application of HFFU at 30 min. No effect (p > 0.05) was observed on other color parameters, drip loss, and water holding capacity of meat. Overall, HFFU improved beef tenderness without negative impacts on color, pH, drip loss, and water holding capacity of meat. HFFU offers the option of tenderizing specific muscles or anatomical regions of the beef carcass. These findings provide new insights into the potential application of ultrasound in meat processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 4107 KiB  
Article
Influence of Plant-Based Proteins on the Fresh and Cooked Characteristics of Ground Beef Patties
by Jase J. Ball, Ross P. Wyatt, Barry D. Lambert, Hunter R. Smith, Tristan M. Reyes and Jason T. Sawyer
Foods 2021, 10(9), 1971; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10091971 - 24 Aug 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2826
Abstract
Blended meat/plant products are capturing industry market space at the retail counter for value-added beef products. Plant protein ingredients can be added to meat formulations to create appealing and functional products. Ground beef was combined with one of three plant protein inclusion treatments: [...] Read more.
Blended meat/plant products are capturing industry market space at the retail counter for value-added beef products. Plant protein ingredients can be added to meat formulations to create appealing and functional products. Ground beef was combined with one of three plant protein inclusion treatments: control, pea, oat, or rice, along with 5% textured vegetable protein (TVP) and 1.5% soy protein concentrate then formed into 226 g patties containing up to 10% plant-based proteins. Patties were analyzed for fresh and cooked characteristics throughout a 5- or 7-day retail display. The inclusion of plant-based proteins negatively affected the instrumental tenderness values which were greater (p < 0.01) in plant-inclusion patties compared to the control patties. The inclusion of plant proteins increased (p = 0.01) the cooking yield of patties compared to the control. Cooking time was longer (p = 0.04) for oat patties compared to the control patties. Cooked color values for vegetable inclusion patties did not affect (p = 0.12) lightness (CIE L*) values; however, redness (CIE a*) was greater (p < 0.01) for rice than all other treatments and yellowness (CIE b*) values were greater (p < 0.01) for all protein treatments compared to the control. Rice improved (p < 0.01) fresh a* values on day 5 of display compared to the control; whereas pea decreased (p = 0.04) values compared to the control. There was a treatment × day interaction (p < 0.01) on lipid oxidation values with a reduction in values on day 3 for all vegetable proteins compared to the control and on day 7 lipid oxidation was reduced (p ≤ 0.03) for oat patties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1496 KiB  
Article
Total and Partial Fat Replacement by Gelled Emulsion (Hemp Oil and Buckwheat Flour) and Its Impact on the Chemical, Technological and Sensory Properties of Frankfurters
by Carmen Botella-Martínez, Manuel Viuda-Martos, José Angel Pérez-Álvarez and Juana Fernández-López
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1681; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081681 - 21 Jul 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2574
Abstract
A gelled emulsion (GE) prepared with hemp oil and buckwheat flour was used to replace pork back fat in frankfurters. Five different formulations were prepared: control (with 35% pork back fat—SC), and the following four to achieve 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% pork [...] Read more.
A gelled emulsion (GE) prepared with hemp oil and buckwheat flour was used to replace pork back fat in frankfurters. Five different formulations were prepared: control (with 35% pork back fat—SC), and the following four to achieve 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% pork back fat substitution by GE (S1, S2, S3, and S4, respectively). Nutritional, technological, and sensorial characteristics of frankfurters were evaluated. Sausages containing GE presented a lower total fat content with a higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids, increased omega 3 content, and reduced saturated fat by up to 55%. The incorporation of GE did not significantly modify technological properties such as emulsion stability or lipid oxidation in spite of using vegetable oils highly susceptible to oxidation. The reformulation of the frankfurters presented a greater effect on the texture and sensory properties when GE was used as total substitution for the pork back fat (S4). When GE was used only as partial substitution for the pork back fat, sausages similar to control frankfurter were obtained. So this study demonstrated that the use of GE could be a promising strategy in the reformulation of healthier meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2927 KiB  
Article
Quality Traits of Montanera Iberian Dry-Cured lomito as Affected by Pre-Cure Freezing Practice
by David Tejerina, Lucía León, Susana García-Torres, Miriam Sánchez and Alberto Ortiz
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1511; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071511 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1483
Abstract
The seasonality to which dry-cured products from Iberian breed pigs finished in Montanera (free-range rearing system with feed based exclusively on ad libitum consumption of natural resources; acorns and grass) are subjected could be overcome by pre-cure freezing. Three sets of Montanera Iberian [...] Read more.
The seasonality to which dry-cured products from Iberian breed pigs finished in Montanera (free-range rearing system with feed based exclusively on ad libitum consumption of natural resources; acorns and grass) are subjected could be overcome by pre-cure freezing. Three sets of Montanera Iberian presas (Serratus ventralis muscle) (n = 15) were established to assess the impact of frozen storage -0, or non-frozen, 3 and 6 months—previous to the technological process of curing—on the quality traits of the dry-cured product Montanera Iberian dry-cured lomito. Similar seasoning and curing processing conditions were applied to all sets. Lower productive performance due to higher weight loss during curing, and lower colour intensity were observed in pre-frozen dry-cured lomitos. The fatty acid profile was more saturated, and the oxidative status increased as a result of pre-cure freezing. On the matter of texture, all parameters were modified, highlighting the higher values of hardness and shear force of pre-frozen dry-cured lomitos. The time that raw material was frozen exerted a slight, thus helping manufacturers to better address the gap between industry and consumer demand with minimal effect on quality traits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 2156 KiB  
Article
Innovative Characterization Based on Stress Relaxation and Creep to Reveal the Tenderizing Effect of Ultrasound on Wooden Breast
by Zhen Li, Zongyun Yang, Yulong Zhang, Tong Lu, Xiaoqian Zhang, Yue Qi, Peng Wang and Xinglian Xu
Foods 2021, 10(1), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010195 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3509
Abstract
In order to explore a new strategy to characterize the texture of raw meat, based on the ultrasonic tenderized wooden breast (WB), this study proposed stress relaxation and creep to determine the rheological properties. Results showed that hardness was significantly decreased from 3625.61 [...] Read more.
In order to explore a new strategy to characterize the texture of raw meat, based on the ultrasonic tenderized wooden breast (WB), this study proposed stress relaxation and creep to determine the rheological properties. Results showed that hardness was significantly decreased from 3625.61 g to 2643.64 g, and elasticity increased, after 600 W ultrasound treatment at 20 kHz for 20 min (on-time 2 s and off-time 3 s) at 4 °C. In addition, based on the transformation of creep data, a new indicator, slope ε′(t), was innovatively used to simulate a sensory feedback of hardness from the touch sensation, proving WB became tender at 600 W treatment due to the feedback speed to external force. These above results were confirmed by the reduced shear force, increased myofibril fragmentation index (MFI), decreased particle size, and increased myofibrillar protein degradation. Histology analysis and collagen suggested the tenderizing results was caused by muscle fiber rather than connective tissue. Overall, stress relaxation and creep had a potential to predict meat texture characteristics and 600 W ultrasound treatment was an effective strategy to reduce economic losses of WB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

22 pages, 2552 KiB  
Review
Recent Developments and Applications of Nanosystems in the Preservation of Meat and Meat Products
by Araceli Ulloa-Saavedra, Claudia García-Betanzos, María Zambrano-Zaragoza, David Quintanar-Guerrero, Susana Mendoza-Elvira and Benjamín Velasco-Bejarano
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2150; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142150 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3802
Abstract
Due to their high water, lipid, and protein content, meat and meat products are highly perishable. The principal spoilage mechanisms involved are protein and lipid oxidation and deterioration caused by microbial growth. Therefore, efforts are ongoing to ensure food safety and increase shelf [...] Read more.
Due to their high water, lipid, and protein content, meat and meat products are highly perishable. The principal spoilage mechanisms involved are protein and lipid oxidation and deterioration caused by microbial growth. Therefore, efforts are ongoing to ensure food safety and increase shelf life. The development of low-cost, innovative, eco-friendly approaches, such as nanotechnology, using non-toxic, inexpensive, FDA-approved ingredients is reducing the incorporation of chemical additives while enhancing effectiveness and functionality. This review focuses on advances in the incorporation of natural additives that increase the shelf life of meat and meat products through the application of nanosystems. The main solvent-free preparation methods are reviewed, including those that involve mixing organic–inorganic or organic–organic compounds with such natural substances as essential oils and plant extracts. The performance of these additives is analyzed in terms of their antioxidant effect when applied directly to meat as edible coatings or marinades, and during manufacturing processes. The review concludes that nanotechnology represents an excellent option for the efficient design of new meat products with enhanced characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 6265 KiB  
Review
Pleurotus Genus as a Potential Ingredient for Meat Products
by Brisa del Mar Torres-Martínez, Rey David Vargas-Sánchez, Gastón Ramón Torrescano-Urrutia, Martin Esqueda, Javier Germán Rodríguez-Carpena, Juana Fernández-López, Jose Angel Perez-Alvarez and Armida Sánchez-Escalante
Foods 2022, 11(6), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11060779 - 08 Mar 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 6518
Abstract
Edible mushrooms are considered an important source of nutritional and bioactive compounds. In this review, the findings of macronutrients, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and antimicrobials against foodborne pathogens of some Pleurotus spp., as well as their potential use as an ingredient in the [...] Read more.
Edible mushrooms are considered an important source of nutritional and bioactive compounds. In this review, the findings of macronutrients, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and antimicrobials against foodborne pathogens of some Pleurotus spp., as well as their potential use as an ingredient in the meat industry are discussed. The results show that Pleurotus spp. are an important source of proteins and amino acids, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins. Additionally, the presence of some bioactive components, such as polysaccharides (α-glucans, β-glucans, and so on), proteins/enzymes and peptides (eryngin, pleurostrin, and others) phenolic acids (p-coumaric, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, protocatechuic, and others) and flavonoids (chrysin, naringenin, myricetin, quercetin, rutin, or the like) has been demonstrated. Several works evidenced the use of Pleurotus spp. in some meat and meat products (patties, sausages, paste, and suchlike) as a novel ingredient in order to improve their chemical composition and functional health promoting properties, as well as to increase their physicochemical and sensory attributes. In conclusion, the use of Pleurotus is a promissory strategy for the development of natural additives rich in nutritional and bioactive components for meat and meat product formulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation Trends for the Meat Industry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop