Special Issue "Thermal Processing of Food Products"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Processing and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Felix Barron

Food Nutrition and Packaging Sciences Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermal processing; food packaging; probiotics; food engineering and HACCP and sanitation engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The thermal processing of foods is a very critical area of importance in the commercial production of preserved foods. In order to render processed foods shelf stable, multiple factors need to be considered in order to assure food safety. Our goal is to publish original papers contributing to the knowledge of thermally processed foods. Scientific works to be accepted include but not limited to the following areas: Thermo bacteriology, thermal process designs, food packaging of canned foods, food laws and regulations, validations studies in commercial sterilization and pasteurization, effects of thermal processing on the nutritional and sensory attributes of foods, and thermal processing methods.

Prof. Felix Barron
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Thermal processing
  • Thermo bacteriology
  • Thermal processing methods
  • Food structure
  • Food nutritional attributes
  • Food sensory attributes
  • Relevant food laws and regulations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Rheological, Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Golden Berry (Physalis peruviana L.) after Convective and Microwave Drying
Received: 15 June 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 25 July 2017 / Published: 29 July 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studies on methods for fixing foods (with a slight loss of bioactive compounds) and obtaining attractive products are important with respect to current technology. The drying process allows for a product with highly bioactive properties. Drying of Physalis fruit was carried out in
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Studies on methods for fixing foods (with a slight loss of bioactive compounds) and obtaining attractive products are important with respect to current technology. The drying process allows for a product with highly bioactive properties. Drying of Physalis fruit was carried out in a conventional manner, and in a microwave under reduced pressure at 120 W and 480 W. After drying, the fruits were subjected to strength and rheological tests. Water activity, content of carotenoids and polyphenols and antioxidant activity as well as colour were also examined. The study showed that Physalis is a difficult material for drying. The best results were obtained using microwave drying at a power of 480 W. Physalis fruit microwave-dried by this method is characterized by higher resistance to compression than the fruit dried by convection. Dried fruit obtained in this way was characterized by higher contents of bioactive compounds, better antioxidant properties, and at the same time the lowest water activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Processing of Food Products)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Physiology of the Inactivation of Vegetative Bacteria by Thermal Treatments: Mode of Action, Influence of Environmental Factors and Inactivation Kinetics
Foods 2017, 6(12), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6120107
Received: 10 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 30 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2377 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Heat has been used extensively in the food industry as a preservation method, especially due to its ability to inactivate microorganisms present in foods. However, many aspects regarding the mechanisms of bacterial inactivation by heat and the factors affecting this process are still
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Heat has been used extensively in the food industry as a preservation method, especially due to its ability to inactivate microorganisms present in foods. However, many aspects regarding the mechanisms of bacterial inactivation by heat and the factors affecting this process are still not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to offer a general overview of the most important aspects of the physiology of the inactivation or survival of microorganisms, particularly vegetative bacteria, submitted to heat treatments. This could help improve the design of current heat processes methods in order to apply milder and/or more effective treatments that could fulfill consumer requirements for fresh-like foods while maintaining the advantages of traditional heat treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Processing of Food Products)
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Open AccessReview Optimum Thermal Processing for Extended Shelf-Life (ESL) Milk
Foods 2017, 6(11), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6110102
Received: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 November 2017 / Published: 20 November 2017
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Abstract
Extended shelf-life (ESL) or ultra-pasteurized milk is produced by thermal processing using conditions between those used for traditional high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization and those used for ultra-high-temperature (UHT) sterilization. It should have a refrigerated shelf-life of more than 30 days. To achieve this,
[...] Read more.
Extended shelf-life (ESL) or ultra-pasteurized milk is produced by thermal processing using conditions between those used for traditional high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization and those used for ultra-high-temperature (UHT) sterilization. It should have a refrigerated shelf-life of more than 30 days. To achieve this, the thermal processing has to be quite intense. The challenge is to produce a product that has high bacteriological quality and safety but also very good organoleptic characteristics. Hence the two major aims in producing ESL milk are to inactivate all vegetative bacteria and spores of psychrotrophic bacteria, and to cause minimal chemical change that can result in cooked flavor development. The first aim is focused on inactivation of spores of psychrotrophic bacteria, especially Bacillus cereus because some strains of this organism are pathogenic, some can grow at ≤7 °C and cause spoilage of milk, and the spores of some strains are very heat-resistant. The second aim is minimizing denaturation of β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) as the extent of denaturation is strongly correlated with the production of volatile sulfur compounds that cause cooked flavor. It is proposed that the heating should have a bactericidal effect, B* (inactivation of thermophilic spores), of >0.3 and cause ≤50% denaturation of β-Lg. This can be best achieved by heating at high temperature for a short holding time using direct heating, and aseptically packaging the product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Processing of Food Products)
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