Special Issue "Preservation and Processing Technology of Seafood"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Eduardo Esteves
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Engenharia Alimentar, Insituto Superior de Engenharia, Universidade do Algarve and CCMAR Centro de Ciências do Mar, Faro, Portugal
Interests: seafood processing; quality control in seafood processing; sensory analysis and sensometrics; traditional seafood products; statistcal modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, consumption of seafood and related products has grown, as they are increasingly perceived as healthy and commended by health organizations due to their nutritional composition. Notwithstanding, ambient and species-specific characteristics make seafood very perishable food products with limited shelf life. Thus, the need to guarantee their quality and safety is critical. In addition to the safety issues and alongside the shift towards convenient forms of fish and seafood consumption, quality is considered central in determining seafood acceptability by consumers. Considering the diversity of marine and freshwater systems worldwide, both in environmental conditions as well as number and diversity of aquatic organisms, the observable changes in the quality characteristics of seafood processed and/or stored under various conditions are expectedly different, namely in undervalued and/or less studied species and locales. New and emerging developments, technologies, methods, and approaches to fish and seafood processing and hurdle and traditional technologies to retain the quality and safety, as well as methodologies to assess the changes observed in several seafood products under different conditions (chilled fresh, packaged under different conditions, with added preservatives, heat- or pressure-assisted processing, thawing, etc.) being developed are interesting and will complement the published literature.

Prof. Eduardo Esteves
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Seafood
  • Preservation
  • Shelf-life
  • Processing
  • Quality

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effects of Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Quality and Shelf-Life of Gray Triggerfish (Balistes capriscus) Fillets
Foods 2021, 10(2), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020250 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 515
Abstract
Seafood products are perceived as healthy foods. However, several species of seafood are still not fully utilized for different reasons or can be valued outside the original locale, if issues with the short shelf-life and/or the preparation/presentation form are overcome, e.g., gray triggerfish, [...] Read more.
Seafood products are perceived as healthy foods. However, several species of seafood are still not fully utilized for different reasons or can be valued outside the original locale, if issues with the short shelf-life and/or the preparation/presentation form are overcome, e.g., gray triggerfish, Balistes capriscus. Consumed mostly fresh, its flesh is of excellent quality. We studied the effect of different types of packaging (in air (AIR), vacuum (VP), and modified atmosphere (MAP)) on physicochemical (color and texture, pH, and total volatile basic nitrogen), microbiological (total viable count, psychrotrophic, sulphide-reducing bacteria, and acid-lactic bacteria), and sensory qualities, and shelf-life of gray triggerfish fillets stored at refrigeration temperature for 15 days. The samples were analyzed on days 0 (fresh fish), 5, 10 (8 and 12 for sensory analysis), and 15 after filleting and packaging. During the trial, fillets became lighter (increased L*) and yellower (b* >> 0) with time of storage. Distinct patterns were observed for pH among treatments. Unexpectedly, the increasing trend observed in the texturometer-derived hardness of VP and MAP fillets, contrasted with the sensory assessment, wherein panelists perceived a clear softening of fillets. VP delayed and MAP inhibited the increase in TVB-N contents of fillets compared to fillets packed in AIR. Total viable count and psychrothropic bacteria of fillets in AIR exceeded the conventional limit of 7 log(CFU/g) on day 10, while in fillets packed in VP and MAP, their abundance remained below that limit during the trial. The organoleptic attributes of fillets perceived by a sensory panel changed significantly in all treatments during the storage trial. Willingness to consume the fillets decreased constantly in AIR and MAP, but not in VP fillets. Considering primarily sensory, but also biochemical and microbiological parameters, namely panelists’ rejection, total volatile basic nitrogen content, and total viable count and psychrotrophic bacteria abundance, the shelf-life of fillets packed in air was eight days. Vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging extended the shelf-life to 15 and 12 days, and thus can add value to this product. Future research regarding the VP and MAP of gray triggerfish fillets could involve the optimization of mixtures of gases use and/or the application of combined processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preservation and Processing Technology of Seafood)
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Article
Bioshell Calcium Oxide-Containing Liquids as a Sanitizer for the Reduction of Histamine Production in Raw Japanese Pilchard, Japanese Horse Mackerel, and Chub Mackerel
Foods 2020, 9(7), 964; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070964 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Recently, there has been an increase in the number of food poisoning cases associated with histamine in food, mainly in relation to histamine in fish. Here, we investigated methods to decrease histamine levels in Japanese pilchard, Japanese horse mackerel, and chub Mackerel, stored [...] Read more.
Recently, there has been an increase in the number of food poisoning cases associated with histamine in food, mainly in relation to histamine in fish. Here, we investigated methods to decrease histamine levels in Japanese pilchard, Japanese horse mackerel, and chub Mackerel, stored at 10 °C using various concentrations of heated scallop bioshell calcium oxide (BiSCaO) suspension, dispersion (BiSCaO + Na2HPO4), colloidal dispersion (BiSCaO + NapolyPO4), scallop shell powder (SSP) Ca(OH)2 in pure water (PW) or saline, and BiSCaO water. BiSCaO in a high alkaline pH solution chemically decomposes histamine poorly, but the partial flocculation/precipitation of histamine was observed with 1 and 0.2 wt.% BiSCaO dispersion and BiSCaO colloidal dispersion, respectively. Cleaning fish samples with BiSCaO suspension, dispersion, colloidal dispersion, or BiSCaO water remarkably reduced histamine levels and normal bacterial flora (coliform bacteria (CF) and total viable bacterial cells (TC)) after storage for four days at 10 °C, while much higher histamine levels were observed after cleaning with saline. These results suggest that cleaning fish with BiSCaO dispersion, colloidal dispersion, or BiSCaO water can significantly reduce histamine levels through their bactericidal activity against histamine-producing bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preservation and Processing Technology of Seafood)
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Article
Effects of Immersion Freezing on Ice Crystal Formation and the Protein Properties of Snakehead (Channa argus)
Foods 2020, 9(4), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040411 - 02 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 825
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immersion freezing (IF) at different temperatures on ice crystal formation and protein properties in fish muscle. Snakehead blocks were frozen by IF at −20, −30, and −40 °C, and conventional air freezing (AF) at −20 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immersion freezing (IF) at different temperatures on ice crystal formation and protein properties in fish muscle. Snakehead blocks were frozen by IF at −20, −30, and −40 °C, and conventional air freezing (AF) at −20 °C. The size of ice crystals in the frozen samples was evaluated using Image J software. Changes in protein properties were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Snakehead blocks frozen using IF contained smaller ice crystals and better microstructures, especially at lower temperatures. The mean cross-sectional areas of ice crystals formed in the frozen samples were 308.8, 142.4, and 86.5 μm2 for IF treatments at −20, −30, and −40 °C, respectively, and 939.6 μm2 for the AF treatment. The FT-IR results show that protein aggregation in the frozen fish blocks was manifested by a decrease in α-helices connected to the increased random coil fraction. The DSC results show that samples prepared by IF had a higher denaturation enthalpy (∆H) and denaturation maximum temperature (Tmax) than those prepared by AF. These results confirm that IF generated a larger number of smaller ice crystals, which is conducive to food preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preservation and Processing Technology of Seafood)
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Review

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Review
Quality Assessment of Chilled and Frozen Fish—Mini Review
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1739; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121739 - 25 Nov 2020
Viewed by 978
Abstract
Fish is a very perishable food and therefore several storage strategies need to be employed to increase its shelf-life, guaranteeing its safety and quality from catch to consumption. Despite the advances in modern fish storage technologies, chilling and freezing are still the most [...] Read more.
Fish is a very perishable food and therefore several storage strategies need to be employed to increase its shelf-life, guaranteeing its safety and quality from catch to consumption. Despite the advances in modern fish storage technologies, chilling and freezing are still the most common preservation methods used onboard. The present review aims to summarize strategies to increase the shelf-life of fresh (chilled) and frozen fish, as whole, gutted, or fillet, involving the assessment of different traditional cooling and freezing conditions of different fish species caught in different locations. Although there are other factors that influence the fish shelf-life, such as the fish species and the stress suffered during catch, storage time and temperature and the amount of ice are some of the most important. In addition, the way that fish is stored (whole, fillet, or gutted) also contributes to the final quality of the product. In most studies, whole chilled and frozen fish present longer shelf-life than those preserved as gutted and filleted. However, it should be noted that other factors related to the organism, capture method, and transport to the preparation/processing industry should be considered for shelf-life extension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preservation and Processing Technology of Seafood)
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