Chemistry and Hygiene of Food Additives: Health Consequences for Consumers

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2494

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: hygiene and food safety; food packaging and safety, food packaging as a preservation system; HACCP; food technology; food composition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: hygiene and food safety; food technology; food composition; minerals and foods/diet; toxic metals in food

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additives fulfill several useful functions in food, some of which are essential to preserve hygienic, nutritional or sensory qualities, since food is exposed throughout the food chain to numerous factors that can alter it. The functions of additives include preserving nutritional value; improving the quality or shelf stability of a food or its organoleptic properties, provided that it is not misleading; and helping in the manufacture, transformation, preparation, treatment, packaging, transport or storage of food. In Europe, only additives authorized by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) can be used; prior to their use, these are subjected to a very rigorous evaluation and authorization process in order to guarantee their safety.

Despite the different surveillance and control actions regarding food additives carried out by the different states of the European Union, these substances arouse suspicion in the population, who often perceive them as harmful to health. Scientific evidence, on the other hand, shows that their use is safe. However, and given the "bad press" they enjoy, the food industry, in its attempt to satisfy consumer demands with 100% natural foods, is looking for other substances: for example, the extracts of aromatic plants with antioxidant and preservative purposes. Yet, one might wonder, are these natural substances as effective in guaranteeing the hygienic and nutritional quality of food as chemical additives?

Prof. Dr. Marina Villalón-Mir
Prof. Dr. Miguel Navarro-Alarcon
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • food additives
  • hygiene
  • safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2127 KiB  
Article
High-Hydrostatic-Pressure-Stabilized White Grape Pomace to Improve the Oxidative Stability of Dry-Cured Sausages (“Salchichón”)
by Ana Isabel Carrapiso, María Jesús Martín-Mateos, Matilde D’Arrigo, Jonathan Delgado-Adámez, Jorge Alexandre Saraiva and María Rosario Ramírez-Bernabé
Foods 2024, 13(5), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050687 - 24 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 917
Abstract
White grape pomace (winery by-product) stabilized by blanching and high hydrostatic pressure has recently been successful at delaying lipid oxidation in burgers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it can also delay lipid oxidation in dry-cured sausages, and to compare [...] Read more.
White grape pomace (winery by-product) stabilized by blanching and high hydrostatic pressure has recently been successful at delaying lipid oxidation in burgers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it can also delay lipid oxidation in dry-cured sausages, and to compare its effect when added at 0.5 and 3% with those of synthetic additives (sodium nitrite and ascorbic acid) and no additives (Control) in lipid and protein oxidation, the instrumental color, the sensory characteristics, and the volatile compounds. The pomace (68.7 ± 7.4 mmol Trolox g−1) was as effective as the additives at preventing lipid oxidation, resulting in values 3.2–3.8 times lower than the Control sausages. However, the pomace was not effective at decreasing the microbial counts, improving the instrumental and sensory color and the volatile compound profile, and decreasing the off-odor and off-flavor developed in the Control sausages. The lack of a detrimental effect of the pomace at 0.5% on the volatile compounds and the sensory characteristics and its benefits to delay lipid oxidation suggest that it might be useful to improve the oxidative stability. Conversely, at 3%, with a detrimental effect on some sensory characteristics and no benefits over the lower dosage, is not advisable. Full article
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14 pages, 879 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Exposure to Aluminum through Consumption of Noodle Products
by Nalinrat Kongta, Kunchit Judprasong, Rodjana Chunhabundit, Jintana Sirivarasai and Weeraya Karnpanit
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3960; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213960 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1149
Abstract
This study aimed to determine aluminum (Al) contents in commonly consumed noodles and estimate the risk of Al exposure through the consumption of noodles in the Thai population. A total of 80 samples, 20 samples each of rice stick noodles, egg noodles, wide [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine aluminum (Al) contents in commonly consumed noodles and estimate the risk of Al exposure through the consumption of noodles in the Thai population. A total of 80 samples, 20 samples each of rice stick noodles, egg noodles, wide rice noodles, and Thai rice noodles was purchased from markets in Bangkok Metropolitan and other four provinces in each region of Thailand. Wet digestion and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) were used to determine Al contents. Exposure assessment of Al was conducted by applying the consumption amounts of noodles from the national consumption survey and the Al contents of the noodle samples. The hazard quotient (HQ) was calculated to estimate the risk of exposure to Al. Aluminum contents in the noodles ranged from not detected to 630 mg/kg. Exposure to Al from consumption of each noodle product in all age groups was lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI). However, Al exposures in children calculated from the high consumer models and Al exposures in all age groups from the worst-case scenarios were higher than the PTWI, indicating potential adverse health effects. Consumers who regularly consume large amounts of noodle products containing Al may be at risk of having adverse health effects. Full article
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