Special Issue "Novel Microbial Control Techniques for Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Domenico Meloni
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
Interests: food microbiology; foodborne pathogens; shellfish safety; meat safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue of Foods is to present the state-of-the-art of novel microbial control techniques for foods. Although conventional microbial control techniques are currently employed and largely successful, their major drawbacks are related to their effect on the quality of processed food. In recent years, there has been a strong and increasing demand for high-quality foods that retain microbial safety and most of their natural freshness. This has led to the development of several modern and innovative methods of microbial control in food processing. Original research and review papers dealing with all aspects of "Novel Microbial Control Techniques for Foods" are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Foods.

Dr. Domenico Meloni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food control
  • microbiology
  • food processing
  • safety
  • food technology
  • quality
  • foodborne pathogens

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Antibiotics, Acid and Heat Tolerance of Honey adapted Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae
Foods 2020, 9(3), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030311 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The medicinal importance of honey has been known for many decades due to its antimicrobial properties against life-threatening bacteria. However, previous studies revealed that microorganisms are able to develop adaptations after continuous exposure to antimicrobial compounds. The present study was conducted to explore [...] Read more.
The medicinal importance of honey has been known for many decades due to its antimicrobial properties against life-threatening bacteria. However, previous studies revealed that microorganisms are able to develop adaptations after continuous exposure to antimicrobial compounds. The present study was conducted to explore the impact of subinhibitory concentrations of branded honey (Marhaba) and unbranded honey (extracted from Ziziphus mauritiana plant) locally available in Pakistan on Escherichia coli ATCC 10536, Salmonella Typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae by investigating the development of self- or cross-resistance to antibiotics (gentamicin, kanamycin and imipenem). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of autoclaved honeys were determined. The bacterial cells of E. coli ATCC 10536, S. Typhi and K. pneumoniae were subjected to honey adaptation by exposing to ¼ × MIC (4 passages) and ½ × MIC (4 passages) of both honeys. Moreover, tolerance to low pH and high temperature was also studied in adapted and unadapted cells. The decreasing trend in growth pattern (OD600nm) of E. coli ATCC 10536, S. Typhi and K. pneumoniae was observed with increases in the concentration of honeys (6.25–50% v/v) respectively. Our results showed that continuous exposure of both honeys did not lead to the development of any self- or cross-resistance in tested bacteria. However, percent survival to low pH was found to be significantly higher in adapted cells as compared to unadapted cells. The results indicate that both branded honey (Marhaba) and unbranded honey (extracted from Ziziphus mauritiana plant) were effective in controlling the growth of tested pathogenic bacteria. However, the emergence of tolerance to adverse conditions (pH 2.5, temperature 60 °C) deserves further investigation before proposing honey as a better antibacterial agent in food fabrication/processing, where low pH and high temperatures are usually implemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Microbial Control Techniques for Foods)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
High-Hydrostatic-Pressure (HHP) Processing Technology as a Novel Control Method for Listeria monocytogenes Occurrence in Mediterranean-Style Dry-Fermented Sausages
Foods 2019, 8(12), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120672 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Although conventional microbial control techniques are currently employed and largely successful, their major drawbacks are related to their effects on quality of processed food. In recent years, there has been a growing demand for high-quality foods that are microbially safe and retain most [...] Read more.
Although conventional microbial control techniques are currently employed and largely successful, their major drawbacks are related to their effects on quality of processed food. In recent years, there has been a growing demand for high-quality foods that are microbially safe and retain most of their natural freshness. Therefore, several modern and innovative methods of microbial control in food processing have been developed. High-hydrostatic-pressure (HHP) processing technology has been mainly used to enhance the food safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) products as a new pre-/post-packaging, non-thermal purification method in the meat industry. Listeria monocytogenes is a pertinent target for microbiological safety and shelf-life; due to its capacity to multiply in a broad range of food environments, is extremely complicated to prevent in fermented-sausage-producing plants. The frequent detection of L. monocytogenes in final products emphasizes the necessity for the producers of fermented sausages to correctly overcome the hurdles of the technological process and to prevent the presence of L. monocytogenes by applying novel control techniques. This review discusses a collection of recent studies describing pressure-induced elimination of L. monocytogenes in fermented sausages produced in the Mediterranean area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Microbial Control Techniques for Foods)
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