Special Issue "Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mazeyar Parvinzadeh Gashti

PRE Labs Inc., Kelowna, BC V1V 2X8, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of crystals by gel diffusion; evaluation of biopolymer gels in crystals by microscopic techniques; UV-induced gel formation; composite crystals for biological applications and drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, we know that nanotechnology has been considered extensively in fiber and textile engineering in order to perform new functionalities. Ultrafine nanoparticles can transfer their intrinsic properties to fibers and textiles by surface coatings. Although several research studies confirmed such functionalities, research is still in progress in laboratories around the world to establish further results. Smart coatings can also be performed on textile products through other methods, such as plasma and laser coatings, sol-gel techniques, magnetron sputter coating, layer-by-layer techniques and crosslinking using polymers. Several properties are demonstrated using these methods, such as antibacterial, superhydrophobic, fire retardant, self–cleaning, superhydrophilic, moth-proofing, electromagnetic shielding, and electrical conductivity.

In this Special Issue, original research papers, as well as reviews, are welcome. The goal is to gather contributions on various aspects related to smart coatings, including preparation, analyses, industrial uses, as well as their potential toxicity to humans during their usage.

I hope that this Special Issue will provide the scientific community with a thorough overview of the current research on smart fibers and textiles.

Dr. Mazeyar Parvinzadeh Gashti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surface grafting
  • plasma and laser
  • nanocomposites
  • layer-by-layer
  • sputter coating
  • functionality
  • toxicity.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Preparation of Chitosan-Coated Poly(L-Lactic Acid) Fibers for Suture Threads
Fibers 2018, 6(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6040084
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 23 October 2018 / Accepted: 24 October 2018 / Published: 25 October 2018
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Abstract
Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) is a biodegradable fiber, and a promising material for use in biomedical applications. However, its hydrophobicity, low hydrolyzability, and poor cell adhesion can be problematic in some cases; consequently, the development of improved PLA-based materials is required. In this study,
[...] Read more.
Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) is a biodegradable fiber, and a promising material for use in biomedical applications. However, its hydrophobicity, low hydrolyzability, and poor cell adhesion can be problematic in some cases; consequently, the development of improved PLA-based materials is required. In this study, chitosan-coated (CS-coated) PLA was prepared by plasma treatment and the layer-by-layer (LBL) method. Plasma treatment prior to CS coating effectively hydrophilized and activated the PLA surface. The LBL method was used to increase the number of CS and sodium alginate (SA) coating layers by electrostatically superposing alternating anionic and cationic polymers. The prepared fibers were characterized by tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen analysis and degradation testing, which revealed that the 100 W plasma treatment for 60 s was optimum, and that plasma treatment and the LBL method effectively coated CS onto the PLA fibers. The existence or not of a coating on the PLA fiber did not appear to influence the degradation of the fiber, which is ascribable to the extremely thin coating, as evidenced by nitrogen analysis and SEM. The CS-coated PLA fibers were prepared without damaging the PLA surface and can be used in biomaterial applications such as suture threads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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Open AccessArticle Applying Image Processing to the Textile Grading of Fleece Based on Pilling Assessment
Fibers 2018, 6(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6040073
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 28 September 2018
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Abstract
Textile pilling causes an undesirable appearance on the surface of garments, which is a long-standing problem. In this study, textile grading of fleece based on pilling assessment was performed using image processing and machine learning methods. Two image processing methods were used. The
[...] Read more.
Textile pilling causes an undesirable appearance on the surface of garments, which is a long-standing problem. In this study, textile grading of fleece based on pilling assessment was performed using image processing and machine learning methods. Two image processing methods were used. The first method involved using the discrete Fourier transform combined with Gaussian filtering, and the second method involved using the Daubechies wavelet. Furthermore, binarization was used to segment the textile pilling from the background. Morphological and topological image processing methods were applied to extract the essential characteristics of textile image information to establish a database for the textile. Finally, machine learning methods, namely the artificial neural network (ANN) and the support vector machine (SVM), were used to objectively solve the textile grading problem. When the Fourier-Gaussian method was used, the classification accuracies of the ANN and SVM were 96.6% and 95.3%, and the overall accuracies of the Daubechies wavelet were 96.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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Open AccessArticle A Time-Efficient Dip Coating Technique for the Deposition of Microgels onto the Optical Fiber Tip
Fibers 2018, 6(4), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6040072
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 23 September 2018 / Published: 28 September 2018
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Abstract
The combination of responsive microgels and Lab-on-Fiber devices represents a valuable technological tool for developing advanced optrodes, especially useful for biomedical applications. Recently, we have reported on a fabrication method, based on the dip coating technique, for creating a microgels monolayer in a
[...] Read more.
The combination of responsive microgels and Lab-on-Fiber devices represents a valuable technological tool for developing advanced optrodes, especially useful for biomedical applications. Recently, we have reported on a fabrication method, based on the dip coating technique, for creating a microgels monolayer in a controlled fashion onto the fiber tip. In the wake of these results, with a view towards industrial applications, here we carefully analyze, by means of both morphological and optical characterizations, the effect of each fabrication step (fiber dipping, rinsing, and drying) on the microgels film properties. Interestingly, we demonstrate that it is possible to significantly reduce the duration (from 960 min to 31 min) and the complexity of the fabrication procedure, without compromising the quality of the microgels film at all. Repeatability studies are carried out to confirm the validity of the optimized deposition procedure. Moreover, the new procedure is successfully applied to different kinds of substrates (patterned gold and bare optical fiber glass), demonstrating the generality of our findings. Overall, the results presented in this work offer the possibility to improve of a factor ~30 the fabrication throughput of microgels-assisted optical fiber probes, thus enabling their possible exploitation in industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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Open AccessArticle Fluoropolymer-Wrapped Conductive Threads for Textile Touch Sensors Operating via the Triboelectric Effect
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020041
Received: 3 May 2018 / Revised: 2 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
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Abstract
Touch-sensitive electrical arrays are the primary user interface for modern consumer electronics. Most contemporary touch sensors, including known iterations of textile-based touch sensors, function by detecting capacitive changes within a circuit resulting from direct skin contact. However, this method of operation fails when
[...] Read more.
Touch-sensitive electrical arrays are the primary user interface for modern consumer electronics. Most contemporary touch sensors, including known iterations of textile-based touch sensors, function by detecting capacitive changes within a circuit resulting from direct skin contact. However, this method of operation fails when the user’s skin or the surface of the touch sensor is dirty, oily or wet, preventing practical use of textile-based touch sensors in real-world scenarios. Here, an electrically touch-responsive woven textile is described, which is composed of fluoropolymer-wrapped conductive threads. The fluoropolymer wrapping prevents contaminant buildup on the textile surface and also electrically insulates the conductive thread core. The woven textile touch sensor operates via surface potential changes created upon skin contact. This method of operation, called the triboelectric effect, has not been widely used to create textile touch sensors, to date. The influences of surface wetness and varying skin surface chemistry are studied, and the triboelectric textile touch sensors are found to be advantageously insensitive to these environmental variables, indicating that triboelectric textiles have promise for practical use as touch interfaces in furniture and interior design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Review on Fabrication of Structurally Colored Fibers by Electrospinning
Fibers 2018, 6(4), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6040070
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 20 September 2018 / Published: 26 September 2018
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Abstract
Structural color derived from the physical interactions of photons, with the specific chromatic mechanism differing from that of dyes and pigments, has brought considerable attention by the conducive virtue of being dye-free and fadeless. This has recently become a research hot-spot. Assemblies of
[...] Read more.
Structural color derived from the physical interactions of photons, with the specific chromatic mechanism differing from that of dyes and pigments, has brought considerable attention by the conducive virtue of being dye-free and fadeless. This has recently become a research hot-spot. Assemblies of colloidal nanoparticles enable the manufacture of periodic photonic nanostructures. In our review, the mechanism of nanoparticle assemblies into structurally colored structures by the electrospinning method was briefly introduced, followed by a comparatively comprehensive review summarizing the research related to photonic crystals with periodically aligned nanostructures constructed by the assembly of colloidal nanoparticles, and the concrete studies concerning the fabrication of well-aligned electrospun nanofibers incorporating with colloidal nanoparticles based on the investigation of relevant factors such as the sizes of colloidal nanoparticles, the weight ratio between colloidal nanoparticles, and the polymer matrix. Electrospinning is expected to be a deserving technique for the fabrication of structurally colored nanofibers while the colloidal nanoparticles can be well confined into aligned arrangement inside nanofibres during the electrospinning process after the achievement of resolving remaining challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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