Special Issue "Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers for Food and Health Applications"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marija Gizdavic-Nikolaidis

Centre for Green Chemical Science&Department of Molecular Medicine & Pathology,Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, the University of Auckland, PO Box 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanotechnology; conducting polymers; biopolymers; electrospinning; polymer composites; hybrid polymers; microwave assisted technology; bioactives

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The electrospinning method has the unique ability to produce structured polymeric fibers on the micro or nano scale and to generate novel materials for food and healthcare purposes. The potential of electrospun nanofibers for human healthcare applications is promising, for example, in tissue/organ repair and regeneration, as vectors to deliver drugs and therapeutics, as biocompatible and biodegradable medical implant devices, in medical diagnostics and instrumentation, as protective fabrics against environmental and infectious agents in hospitals and general surroundings, and in cosmetic and dental applications. Furthermore, considerable effort has been directed toward developing scaffolds using biodegradable and biocompatible synthetic, natural polymers or renewable materials that enhance in vitro cell growth, while killing pathogenic bacteria cells. The electrospun fibrous mats generally exhibit a large surface area to volume ratio due to the high porosity and nano to sub-micron structure of the fibres. The advent of electrospinning has opened up new prospects for the development of architectured materials with enhanced properties for applications such as food packaging, food encapsulation, food storage or the food processing of agricultural products. This Special Issue details current research in this field, focusing on the development of electrospun polymer nanofibers for food and health applications.

Dr. Marija Gizdavic-Nikolaidis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrospinning
  • polymer blend
  • biomaterials
  • microfibres/nanofibres
  • scaffolds
  • electrospun fibres
  • eletrospun fibre mats
  • electrospun green fibres
  • bioactive electrospun fibres
  • electrospun edible fibres
  • natural polymer-based electrospun fibres
  • tissue engineering
  • food packaging
  • wound dressing
  • encapsulation
  • agriculture
  • food industry
  • drug release

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Hydrogel Nanofibers from Carboxymethyl Sago Pulp and Its Controlled Release Studies as a Methylene Blue Drug Carrier
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060056
Received: 12 May 2019 / Revised: 28 May 2019 / Accepted: 3 June 2019 / Published: 15 June 2019
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Abstract
The potential use of carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) extracted from sago waste for producing hydrogel nanofibers was investigated as a methylene blue drug carrier. Sago pulp was chemically modified via carboxymethylation reaction to form carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) and subsequently used to produce [...] Read more.
The potential use of carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) extracted from sago waste for producing hydrogel nanofibers was investigated as a methylene blue drug carrier. Sago pulp was chemically modified via carboxymethylation reaction to form carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) and subsequently used to produce nanofibers using the electrospinning method with the addition of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The CMSP nanofibers were further treated with citric acid to form cross-linked hydrogel. Studies on the percentage of swelling following the variation of citric acid concentrations and curing temperature showed that 89.20 ± 0.42% of methylene blue (MB) was loaded onto CMSP hydrogel nanofibers with the percentage of swelling 4366 ± 975%. Meanwhile, methylene blue controlled release studies revealed that the diffusion of methylene blue was influenced by the pH of buffer solution with 19.44% of MB released at pH 7.34 within 48 h indicating the potential of CMSP hydrogel nanofibers to be used as a drug carrier for MB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers for Food and Health Applications)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Water Absorbing Nanofiber Meshes toward an Efficient Removal of Excess Water from Kidney Failure Patients
Fibers 2019, 7(5), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7050039
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 19 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
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Abstract
Excellent water-absorbing nanofiber meshes were developed as a potential material for removing excess fluids from the blood of chronic renal failure patients toward a wearable blood purification system without requiring specialized equipment. The nanofiber meshes were successfully fabricated from poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) under [...] Read more.
Excellent water-absorbing nanofiber meshes were developed as a potential material for removing excess fluids from the blood of chronic renal failure patients toward a wearable blood purification system without requiring specialized equipment. The nanofiber meshes were successfully fabricated from poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) under various applied voltages by appropriately setting the electrospinning conditions. The electrospun PAA nanofibers were thermally crosslinked via heat treatment and then neutralized from their carboxylic acid form (PAA) to a sodium carboxylate form poly(sodium acrylate) (PSA). The PSA nanofiber meshes exhibited a specific surface area 393 times that of the PSA film. The PSA fiber meshes showed a much faster and higher swelling than its corresponding film, owing to the higher capillary forces from the fibers in addition to the water absorption of the PSA gel itself. The proposed PSA fibers have the potential to be utilized in a new approach to remove excess water from the bloodstream without requiring specialized equipment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers for Food and Health Applications)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Shape-Memory Nanofiber Meshes with Programmable Cell Orientation
Fibers 2019, 7(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7030020
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
PDF Full-text (4140 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work we report the rational design of temperature-responsive nanofiber meshes with shape-memory properties. Meshes were fabricated by electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyurethane with varying ratios of soft (PCL diol) and hard [hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)/1,4-butanediol (BD)] segments. By altering the PCL diol:HDI:BD molar [...] Read more.
In this work we report the rational design of temperature-responsive nanofiber meshes with shape-memory properties. Meshes were fabricated by electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyurethane with varying ratios of soft (PCL diol) and hard [hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)/1,4-butanediol (BD)] segments. By altering the PCL diol:HDI:BD molar ratio both shape-memory properties and mechanical properties could be readily turned and modulated. Though mechanical properties improved by increasing the hard to soft segment ratio, optimal shape-memory properties were obtained using a PCL/HDI/BD molar ratio of 1:4:3. Microscopically, the original nanofibrous structure could be deformed into and maintained in a temporary shape and later recover its original structure upon reheating. Even when deformed by 400%, a recovery rate of >89% was observed. Implementation of these shape memory nanofiber meshes as cell culture platforms revealed the unique ability to alter human mesenchymal stem cell alignment and orientation. Due to their biocompatible nature, temperature-responsivity, and ability to control cell alignment, we believe that these meshes may demonstrate great promise as biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers for Food and Health Applications)
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Graphical abstract

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