Special Issue "Advances in Wind Energy Structures"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Charalampos Baniotopoulos

Guest Editor
Chair of Sustainable Energy Systems, School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT, UK
Interests: sustainable energy systems; wind energy technology; wind energy structures; wind turbine towers; societal acceptance of sustainable energy; sustainable development; aluminium structures; structural steelwork; robustness of sustainable energy systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wind is currently considered as the most promising renewable source of sustainable energy that represents the fastest growing sector globally in terms of power generation. Onshore, offshore, floating and hovering wind farms contribute to this remarkable expansion with a clear trend towards larger wind energy converters and emerging innovative ideas. Rotor diameters exceeding 150 m and turbines generating more than 7.5 MW have started becoming common industrial practice, posing new challenges for structural and wind engineering researchers and practitioners working on different topics referred to the analysis, design, construction, monitoring, maintenance and decommissioning of the complex structural systems required to support the new generation of such wind energy converters.

Thus, to further spread the technologies and methods related to the emerging technologies of wind energy, this Special Issue entitled “Advances In Wind Energy Structures” was proposed for the international journal Energies, which is an SSCI and SCIE journal (2018 IF = 2.707, 5y IF=3.045). This Special Issue principally covers original research and studies related to the above-mentioned topics, including but not limited to wind, wave or current loadings on onshore, offshore, floating and hovering wind turbine towers; the respective challenges referred to their structural systems and materials, foundations and mooring systems of floating structures, guidelines and codes; and related topics.

Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments and applications.

I am writing to invite you to submit your original work to this Special Issue.

I am looking forward to receiving your outstanding research.

Prof. Dr. Charalampos Baniotopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transfer of fundamental research into design guidance
  • Environmental and accidental loads and actions on wind energy structures
  • Wind-wave-current loading and interactions on offshore and floating structures
  • Multi-hazard scenarios and design implications
  • Performance-based, reliability-based and risk-based design approaches
  • Soil–foundation–structure dynamic interactions in onshore and offshore structures
  • Experimental and computational studies on the dynamics of wind energy structures
  • Improved innovative wind turbine tower design concepts
  • Improved innovative wind energy structure foundation systems
  • Improved innovative structural systems
  • Improved innovative techniques of the structural control of wind energy structures
  • The development and use of new materials for wind energy structures
  • Fatigue and wear on wind energy structures
  • Structural health monitoring and maintenance strategies of wind energy structures
  • Through-life analyses, LCA and sustainability design analysis
  • Resilience of wind energy structures
  • Field applications, feasibilty and case studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Life Cycle Assessment of Tall Onshore Hybrid Steel Wind Turbine Towers
Energies 2020, 13(15), 3950; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13153950 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
Increasing needs for taller wind turbines with bigger capacities, intended for places with high wind velocities or at higher altitudes, have led to new technologies in the wind energy industry. A recently introduced structural system for onshore wind turbine towers is the hybrid [...] Read more.
Increasing needs for taller wind turbines with bigger capacities, intended for places with high wind velocities or at higher altitudes, have led to new technologies in the wind energy industry. A recently introduced structural system for onshore wind turbine towers is the hybrid steel tower. Comprehension of the environmental response of this hybrid steel structural system is warranted. Even though life cycle assessments (LCAs) for conventional wind turbine tubular towers exist, the environmental performance of this new hybrid structure has not been reported. The present paper examines the LCA of 185 m tall hybrid towers. Considerations made for the LCA procedure are meticulously described, including particular attention at the erection and transportation stage. The highest environmental impacts arise during the manufacturing stage followed by the erection stage. The tower is the component with the largest carbon emissions and energy requirements. The obtained LCA footprints of hybrid towers are also compared to the literature data on conventional towers, resulting in similar environmental impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wind Energy Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Wind Energy Resource above High-Rise Buildings
Energies 2020, 13(14), 3641; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13143641 - 15 Jul 2020
Abstract
One of the main challenges of urban wind energy harvesting is the understanding of the flow characteristics where urban wind turbines are to be installed. Among viable locations within the urban environment, high-rise buildings are particularly promising due to the elevated height and [...] Read more.
One of the main challenges of urban wind energy harvesting is the understanding of the flow characteristics where urban wind turbines are to be installed. Among viable locations within the urban environment, high-rise buildings are particularly promising due to the elevated height and relatively undisturbed wind conditions. Most research studies on high-rise buildings deal with the calculation of the wind loads in terms of surface pressure. In the present paper, flow pattern characteristics are investigated for a typical high-rise building in a variety of configurations and wind directions in wind tunnel tests. The aim is to improve the understanding of the wind energy resource in the built environment and give designers meaningful data on the positioning strategy of wind turbines to improve performance. In addition, the study provides suitable and realistic turbulence characteristics to be reproduced in physical or numerical simulations of urban wind turbines for several locations above the roof region of the building. The study showed that at a height of 10 m from the roof surface, the flow resembles atmospheric turbulence with an enhanced turbulence intensity above 10% combined with large length scales of about 200 m. Results also showed that high-rise buildings in clusters might provide a very suitable configuration for the installation of urban wind turbines, although there is a strong difference between the performance of a wind turbine installed at the centre of the roof and one installed on the leeward and windward corners or edges, depending on the wind direction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wind Energy Structures)
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