Special Issue "Power Electronics for Energy Saving"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nick Papanikolaou
Website
Guest Editor
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece
Interests: power electronics; renewable energy sources; sustainable energy; (smart) microgrids; electrical transportation; energy saving; power quality
Dr. Dionisios Voglitsis

Guest Editor
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece
Interests: power electronics, renewable energy sources, sustainable energy, (smart) microgrids, electrical transportation, energy saving, power quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern energy conversion systems play a key role in the transition in greener, smarter, and more sustainable development. In the contex of this scope recent advances in power electronics have contributed to the optimization of energy saving in all main industrial and social sectors (smart manufacturing, transportations, biomedicine & e-health etc.). The aim of the present Special Issue is to attract original, high-quality papers and review articles proposing advances in power electronics for energy saving, including materials, methods, tools and applications in industrial processes, agricultural processes, transportations, residential systems, smart city concept etc. Major topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • New materials and methods for energy saving
  • Efficient public transportation systems; all-electric vehicles, aircrafts, trains, and ships, electric vehicle charging strategies and techniques, vehicle-to-grid (V2G)
  • (Smart) Microgrids: grid-tied / standalone solutions and energy management
  • Efficient public transportation systems: all-electric vehicles, aircrafts, trains, and ships, electric vehicle charging strategies and techniques, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G)
  • Energy harvesting for smart applications and wireless power transfer for Distributed Energy Sources
  • Dynamic features of power electonics interfaced energy saving applications
  • Flexible and wide-band performance control schemes for energy saving applications
  • Power electronic concepts for thermoelectric applications and heat recovery systems
  • Power electronic systems for smart buildings and NZEBs
  • Renewable energy conversion systems: design, modelling, control and integration to modern power systems
  • Energy storage: batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, flywheels, new trends and concepts

Dr. Nick Papanikolaou
Dr. Dionisios Voglitsis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • power electronics
  • energy Saving
  • renewable energy sources
  • sustainable energy
  • DC microgrids
  • electrical transportation
  • virtual inertia, solid state transformers
  • power quality
  • energy harvesting
  • energy storage
  • heat recovery
  • thermoelectric applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Study on the V2G Technology Incorporation in a DC Nanogrid and on the Provision of Voltage Regulation to the Power Grid
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102655 - 23 May 2020
Abstract
Currently, environmental and climate change issues raise a lot of concerns related to conventional vehicles and renewable energy generation methods. Thus, more and more researchers around the world focus on the development and deployment of Renewable Energy Sources (RES). Additionally, due to the [...] Read more.
Currently, environmental and climate change issues raise a lot of concerns related to conventional vehicles and renewable energy generation methods. Thus, more and more researchers around the world focus on the development and deployment of Renewable Energy Sources (RES). Additionally, due to the technological advancements in power electronics and electrical batteries, Electrical Vehicles (EVs) are becoming more and more popular. In addition, according to the Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) operation, the EV batteries can provide electrical energy to the power grid. In this way, many ancillary services can be provided. A Direct Current (DC) nanogrid can be composed by combining the aforementioned technologies. Nanogrids present high efficiency and provide a simple interaction with renewable energy sources and energy storage devices. Firstly, the present study describes the design considerations of a DC nanogrid as well as the control strategies that have to be applied in order to make the V2G operation feasible. Furthermore, the provision of voltage regulation toward the power grid is investigated though the bidirectional transfer of active and reactive power between the DC nanogrid and the power grid. Afterwards, the voltage regulation techniques are applied in an Alternating Current (AC) radial distribution grid are investigated. The proposed system is simulated in Matlab/Simulink software and though the simulation scenarios the impact of the voltage regulation provided by the DC nanogrid is investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Energy Saving)
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Open AccessArticle
A Simple Multilevel Space Vector Modulation Technique and MATLAB System Generator Built FPGA Implementation for Three-Level Neutral-Point Clamped Inverter
Energies 2019, 12(22), 4332; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12224332 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The pulse width modulation (PWM) is an important segment in power electronic inverters and multilevel inverters (MLIs) design. The space vector modulation (SVM) methods own distinct advantages over other PWM methods. However, MLI SVM has involved more mathematics in their executions. Hence, the [...] Read more.
The pulse width modulation (PWM) is an important segment in power electronic inverters and multilevel inverters (MLIs) design. The space vector modulation (SVM) methods own distinct advantages over other PWM methods. However, MLI SVM has involved more mathematics in their executions. Hence, the digital signal processors (DSPs) or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) based digital implementations are highly preferred for MLI SVM realizations, which require exceptional properties. The conventional MLI SVMs use complex mathematical functions to solve their internal functions to identify the space vector diagram (SVD) sub-triangle and over modulation boundary switching on-times. Particularly these are the changes in the position of reference vector with respect to their sub-triangle positions involving higher mathematical functions. This paper proposes a simplified three-level MLI SVM that reduces the sub-triangle and over modulation switching on-time calculations with reduced mathematical functions. The proposed MLI SVM is derived based on two-level SVM without changing the reference vector position, unlike the traditional approaches. This helps in extending the SVM for any n-level inverter with additional LUTs. The detailed theoretical study, MATLAB-Simulink system generator simulations and Xilinx FPGA family SPARTAN-III-3A based experimental implementations are done with three-level neutral point MLI fed induction motor drive. The theoretical design, analysis, and experimentation results validate the advantages of the proposed PWM design and its implementation. In addition, the proposed implementation is executed from the MATLAB Xilinx system generator directly into target FPGA, which makes it faithful, efficient and minimizes the time spent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Energy Saving)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimal Allocation of Spinning Reserves in Interconnected Energy Systems with Demand Response Using a Bivariate Wind Prediction Model
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3816; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203816 - 09 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The proposed study presents a novel probabilistic method for optimal allocation of spinning reserves taking into consideration load, wind and solar forecast errors, inter-zonal spinning reserve trading, and demand response provided by consumers as a single framework. The model considers the system contingencies [...] Read more.
The proposed study presents a novel probabilistic method for optimal allocation of spinning reserves taking into consideration load, wind and solar forecast errors, inter-zonal spinning reserve trading, and demand response provided by consumers as a single framework. The model considers the system contingencies due to random generator outages as well as the uncertainties caused by load and renewable energy forecast errors. The study utilizes a novel approach to model wind speed and its direction using the bivariate parametric model. The proposed model is applied to the IEEE two-area reliability test system (RTS) to analyze the influence of inter-zonal power generation and demand response (DR) on the adequacy and economic efficiency of energy systems. In addition, the study analyzed the effect of the bivariate wind prediction model on obtained results. The results demonstrate that the presence of inter-zonal capacity in ancillary service markets reduce the total expected energy not supplied (EENS) by 81.66%, while inclusion of a DR program results in an additional 1.76% reduction of EENS. Finally, the proposed bivariate wind prediction model showed a 0.27% reduction in spinning reserve requirements, compared to the univariate model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Energy Saving)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Conflict between LVRT and Line Protection in LV Distribution Systems with PVs: A Current-Limitation-Based Solution
Energies 2019, 12(15), 2909; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152909 - 29 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The upcoming adoption of low-voltage-ride-through requirements in low-voltage distribution systems is expected to raise significant challenges in the operation of grid-tied inverters. Typically, these inverters interconnect photovoltaic units, which are the predominant distributed energy resource in low-voltage distribution networks, under an umbrella of [...] Read more.
The upcoming adoption of low-voltage-ride-through requirements in low-voltage distribution systems is expected to raise significant challenges in the operation of grid-tied inverters. Typically, these inverters interconnect photovoltaic units, which are the predominant distributed energy resource in low-voltage distribution networks, under an umbrella of standards and protection schemes. As such, a challenging issue that should be considered in low-voltage distribution network applications, regards the coordination between the line protection scheme (typically consisting of a non-settable fuse) and the low-voltage-ride-through operation of photovoltaic generators. During a fault, the fuse protecting a low-voltage feeder may melt, letting the generator to continue its ride-through operation. Considering that the efficacy/speed of the anti-islanding detection is affected by ride-through requirements, this situation can lead to protracted energization of the isolated feeder after fuse melting (unintentional islanding). To address this issue, this paper proposes a fault-current-limitation based solution, which does not require any modification in the existing protection scheme. The operation principles, design, and implementation of this solution are presented, while, its effectiveness is supported by extensive simulations in a test-case low-voltage distribution system. A discussion on the presented results concludes the paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Energy Saving)
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Open AccessArticle
Design Considerations for Parallel Differential Power Processing Converters in a Photovoltaic-Powered Wearable Application
Energies 2018, 11(12), 3329; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11123329 - 29 Nov 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Solar photovoltaic (PV) power is a widely used to supply power to the electric grid but can also be used in lower-power emerging applications, like in wearables or the internet of things. One fundamental challenge of using PV power in flexible wearable applications [...] Read more.
Solar photovoltaic (PV) power is a widely used to supply power to the electric grid but can also be used in lower-power emerging applications, like in wearables or the internet of things. One fundamental challenge of using PV power in flexible wearable applications is that individual PV modules point at various angles, thus receiving different light intensities. Using a series configuration for the PV modules greatly decreases power utilization under uneven irradiance conditions. Parallel differential power processing (DPP) converters are employed to address this power reduction problem, while maintaining individual PV control and maximizing output power. Two parallel DPP configurations, with and without a front-end converter, are analyzed and compared for a target battery-charging application. The DPP system without a front-end converter shows consistently high performance and operates properly over a wider range of lighting conditions. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms are also examined for parallel DPP systems. When the MPPT parameters are properly calibrated, simulation results indicate that voltage-offset resistive control is the most effective at maximizing PV power under unbalanced lighting conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Energy Saving)
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