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Special Issue "From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 3628

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Worapon Kiatkittipong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000, Thailand
Interests: process intensification; biorefinery; bioresources; biofuels
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jun Wei Lim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Centre for Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute of Self-Sustainable Building, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610 Seri Iskandar, Perak Darul Ridzuan, Malaysia
Interests: biofuel; wastewater treatment; larval biochemicals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to draw your attention to an Energies Special Issue titled "From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research”, publishing selected papers from the 2nd ICEIT 2021 jointly with SICTAS, scheduled to be published in 2020.

Selected papers from the 2nd International Conference on Engineering and Industrial Technology (http://www.iceitsu.org/Home/Home.aspx) in Conjunction with the Silpakorn International Conference on Total Art and Science 2021 (http://www.sictas.org/Home/Home.aspx), to be held in Bangkok, Thailand on November 3–5, 2020 will be considered for this Special Issue.

The 2nd International Conference on Engineering and Industrial Technology 2021 (ICEIT 2021) is organized by the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Thailand together with seven co-hosts: Chengdu University, China; National Institute of Technology, Toyota college, Japan; Yamaguchi University, Japan; Kumamoto University, Japan; Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Malaysia; Bio-Circular-Green-economy Technology & Engineering Center (BCGeTEC) and Center of Excellence on Catalysis and Catalytic Reaction Engineering (CECC) of Chulalongkorn University, Thailand; and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand.

In this year, the 2nd ICEIT 2021 will be held in conjunction with SICTAS 2021 on 3–5 November 2021 at Pathumwan Princess Hotel AND Bangkok Art and Culture Centre, Bangkok, Thailand. This is a part of Reinventing University project granted by Ministry of Higher Education, Science, Research and Innovation, Thailand.

The 2nd ICEIT 2021 is a major international conference bringing together researchers, engineers, and practitioners who work in the areas of engineering and industrial technology with a wide spectrum of scientific themes, while the aim of SICTAS is to share and exchange experiences and research findings in all areas, including science and technology, art, and social science.

In this Special Issue, we seek to include comprehensive review papers, methodologies, experimental works, and modeling research articles that could improve our understandings from unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary energy-related research. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: alternative and renewable energy, fuel processing technology, environment, carbon capture and utilization (CCU), and climate change.

P.S.

After the 2nd ICEIT 2021 and SICTAS 2021 conferences, you are welcome to submit your full paper to this Special Issue (From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research, Selected papers from 2nd ICEIT and SICTAS 2021). There is no need to wait for the submission deadline. All papers accepted for publication will be immediately published.

Dr. Worapon Kiatkittipong
Dr. Jun-Wei Lim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Catalytic Hydrotreating of Crude Pongamia pinnata Oil to Bio-Hydrogenated Diesel over Sulfided NiMo Catalyst
Energies 2022, 15(4), 1547; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15041547 - 19 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 494
Abstract
This work studied the catalytic activity and stability of Ni-MoS2 supported on γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and TiO2 toward deoxygenation of different feedstocks, i.e., crude Pongamia pinnata oil (PPO) and refined palm olein (RPO). PPO was used [...] Read more.
This work studied the catalytic activity and stability of Ni-MoS2 supported on γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and TiO2 toward deoxygenation of different feedstocks, i.e., crude Pongamia pinnata oil (PPO) and refined palm olein (RPO). PPO was used as a renewable feedstock for bio-hydrogenated diesel production via catalytic hydrotreating under a temperature of 330 °C, H2 pressure of 50 bar, WHSV of 1.5 h−1, and H2/oil (v/v) of 1000 cm3/cm3 under continuous operation. The oil yield from a Soxhlet extraction of PPO was up to 26 wt.% on a dry basis, mainly consisting of C18 fatty acids. The catalytic activity in terms of conversion and diesel yield was in the same trend as increasing in the order of NiMo/γ-Al2O3 > NiMo/TiO2 > NiMo/SiO2. The hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) activity was more favorable over the sulfided NiMo supported on γ-Al2O3 and TiO2, while a high DCO was observed over the sulfided NiMo/SiO2 catalyst, which related to the properties of the support material and the intensity of metal–support interaction. The deactivation of NiMo/SiO2 and NiMo/TiO2 occurred in a short period, due to the phosphorus and alkali impurities in PPO which were not found in the case of RPO. NiMo/γ-Al2O3 exhibited the high resistance of impure feedstock with excellent stability. This indicates that the catalytic performance is influenced by the purity of the feedstock as well as the characteristics of the catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research)
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Article
In Situ Binder-Free and Hydrothermal Growth of Nanostructured NiCo2S4/Ni Electrodes for Solid-State Hybrid Supercapacitors
Energies 2021, 14(21), 7114; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14217114 - 01 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 620
Abstract
Herein, we report a comparison of the electrochemical performance of two kinds of NiCo2S4-based electrodes for solid-state hybrid supercapacitors (HSCs). For the binder-free electrode, NiCo2S4 was grown on Ni foam by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) [...] Read more.
Herein, we report a comparison of the electrochemical performance of two kinds of NiCo2S4-based electrodes for solid-state hybrid supercapacitors (HSCs). For the binder-free electrode, NiCo2S4 was grown on Ni foam by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. For the binder-using electrode, NiCo2S4 powder was synthesized by the hydrothermal method. FESEM images depicted the hierarchical nanostructure of NiCo2S4 synthesized by the hydrothermal method and uniform distribution of nanostructured NiCo2S4 grown on Ni foam by the CBD method. Half-cell studies of both NiCo2S4 electrodes showed them exhibiting battery-type charge storage behavior. To assemble HSCs, NiCo2S4 and activated carbon were used as a positive and negative electrode, respectively. Electrochemical studies of the HSCs showed that the accessible potential window was wide, up to 2.6 V, through cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis. Chronopotentiometry (CP) studies revealed that the energy and power densities of binder-using HSC were 51.24 Wh/kg and 13 kW/kg at 1 Ag−1, respectively, which were relatively higher than those of the binder-free HSC. The binder-free HSC showed 52% cyclic stability, relatively higher than that of the binder-using HSC. Both HSCs, with unique benefits and burdens on energy storage performance, are discussed in this work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research)
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Article
Coconut Shell-Derived Activated Carbon for High-Performance Solid-State Supercapacitors
Energies 2021, 14(15), 4546; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14154546 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
Coconut shells, low-cost and renewable agro-wastes, were used as a starting material in the synthesis of hierarchical activated carbons via hydrothermal, KOH-activation, and carbonization techniques. The ratio of KOH to hydrochar was varied in a systemic manner to study how it influences the [...] Read more.
Coconut shells, low-cost and renewable agro-wastes, were used as a starting material in the synthesis of hierarchical activated carbons via hydrothermal, KOH-activation, and carbonization techniques. The ratio of KOH to hydrochar was varied in a systemic manner to study how it influences the texture and electrochemical behavior of the capacitor. Coconut shell-based carbon coated on nickel foams presented a surface area of 1567 m2 g−1, with micropores as well as mesopores widely distributed. The sample showed superior electrochemical performance, attaining 449 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 in 6 M LiNO3 aqueous solution. The solid-state symmetric supercapacitor device delivered a specific capacitance of 88 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 and a high energy density of 48.9 Whkg−1 at a power density of 1 kW kg−1. At a wide voltage window of 2.0 V, the sample was highly stable during the cycle test, showing a 92% capacitance retention at 2 A g−1 after cycling for 5000 times. The superior performance is due to the sample possessing great BET surface area, a good distribution of pores, and the usage of a suitable electrolyte. This facilitates an electrical double layer that can be deployed for applications to store energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research)
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Review

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Review
Comprehensive Review on Potential Contamination in Fuel Ethanol Production with Proposed Specific Guideline Criteria
Energies 2022, 15(9), 2986; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15092986 - 20 Apr 2022
Viewed by 545
Abstract
Ethanol is a promising biofuel that can replace fossil fuel, mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and represent a renewable building block for biochemical production. Ethanol can be produced from various feedstocks. First-generation ethanol is mainly produced from sugar- and starch-containing feedstocks. For second-generation [...] Read more.
Ethanol is a promising biofuel that can replace fossil fuel, mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and represent a renewable building block for biochemical production. Ethanol can be produced from various feedstocks. First-generation ethanol is mainly produced from sugar- and starch-containing feedstocks. For second-generation ethanol, lignocellulosic biomass is used as a feedstock. Typically, ethanol production contains four major steps, including the conversion of feedstock, fermentation, ethanol recovery, and ethanol storage. Each feedstock requires different procedures for its conversion to fermentable sugar. Lignocellulosic biomass requires extra pretreatment compared to sugar and starch feedstocks to disrupt the structure and improve enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. Many pretreatment methods are available such as physical, chemical, physicochemical, and biological methods. However, the greatest concern regarding the pretreatment process is inhibitor formation, which might retard enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. The main inhibitors are furan derivatives, aromatic compounds, and organic acids. Actions to minimize the effects of inhibitors, detoxification, changing fermentation strategies, and metabolic engineering can subsequently be conducted. In addition to the inhibitors from pretreatment, chemicals used during the pretreatment and fermentation of byproducts may remain in the final product if they are not removed by ethanol distillation and dehydration. Maintaining the quality of ethanol during storage is another concerning issue. Initial impurities of ethanol being stored and its nature, including hygroscopic, high oxygen and carbon dioxide solubility, influence chemical reactions during the storage period and change ethanol’s characteristics (e.g., water content, ethanol content, acidity, pH, and electrical conductivity). During ethanol storage periods, nitrogen blanketing and corrosion inhibitors can be applied to reduce the quality degradation rate, the selection of which depends on several factors, such as cost and storage duration. This review article sheds light on the techniques of control used in ethanol fuel production, and also includes specific guidelines to control ethanol quality during production and the storage period in order to preserve ethanol production from first-generation to second-generation feedstock. Finally, the understanding of impurity/inhibitor formation and controlled strategies is crucial. These need to be considered when driving higher ethanol blending mandates in the short term, utilizing ethanol as a renewable building block for chemicals, or adopting ethanol as a hydrogen carrier for the long-term future, as has been recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Unidisciplinary to Multidisciplinary Energy Research)
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