Special Issue "Increasing the Lifetime of Photovoltaics Systems: Advanced Materials, Monitoring, O&M and Energy Modeling"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. George E. Georghiou
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Guest Editor
Photovoltaic Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia 1678, Cyprus
Interests: solar energy; photovoltaics; degradation; grid integration; storage; smart grids
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. George Makrides
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Guest Editor
Photovoltaic Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus
Interests: solar energy, photovoltaics, performance, degradation, failure diagnosis, grid integration, energy forecasting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Joshua S. Stein
Website
Guest Editor
Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA
Interests: photovoltaics; PV modeling; monitoring; degradation; bifacial PV
Dr. Marios Theristis
Website
Guest Editor
Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA
Interests: photovoltaics; O&M; PV performance; failure diagnosis; reliability; degradation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing the lifetime and reducing performance degradation of PV systems is vital for making PV the most cost-competitive energy resource and to transform our energy systems. To achieve this goal, we must improve the durability and reliability of PV modules and BOS equipment and respond quickly and intelligently to operational issues. New materials and manufacturing methods can increase the lifetime of PV modules in the field, but may need to be optimized for different climates. Advanced monitoring techniques and fault detection protocols significantly improve the availability of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, hence lowering investment cost, levelized cost of energy (LCOE), benefiting PV competitiveness.

The aim of this Special Issue is to solicit original and high-quality research articles related to the aforementioned topics. In particular, topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • New materials and module designs for increased PV module lifetimes
  • Advanced monitoring of grid-connected photovoltaic systems
  • Enhanced data analytic methods for PV monitoring
  • Degradation rate estimation procedures
  • Failure detection and classification techniques for grid-connected PV systems
  • Modeling of PV system performance
  • Reliability modeling of PV systems

Prof. Dr. George E. Georghiou
Dr. George Makrides
Dr. Joshua S. Stein
Dr. Marios Theristis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photovoltaic (PV)
  • emerging PV
  • monitoring
  • modeling
  • degradation
  • failure diagnosis
  • O&M
  • reliability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mitigating Potential-Induced Degradation (PID) Using SiO2 ARC Layer
Energies 2020, 13(19), 5139; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13195139 - 02 Oct 2020
Abstract
Potential-induced degradation (PID) of photovoltaic (PV) cells is one of the most severe types of degradation, where the output power losses in solar cells may even exceed 30%. In this article, we present the development of a suitable anti-reflection coating (ARC) structure of [...] Read more.
Potential-induced degradation (PID) of photovoltaic (PV) cells is one of the most severe types of degradation, where the output power losses in solar cells may even exceed 30%. In this article, we present the development of a suitable anti-reflection coating (ARC) structure of solar cells to mitigate the PID effect using a SiO2 ARC layer. Our PID testing experiments show that the proposed ARC layer can improve the durability and reliability of the solar cell, where the maximum drop in efficiency was equal to 0.69% after 96 h of PID testing using an applied voltage of 1000 V and temperature setting at 85 °C. In addition, we observed that the maximum losses in the current density are equal to 0.8 mA/cm2, compared with 4.5 mA/cm2 current density loss without using the SiO2 ARC layer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Outdoor PV System Monitoring—Input Data Quality, Data Imputation and Filtering Approaches
Energies 2020, 13(19), 5099; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13195099 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Photovoltaic monitoring data are the primary source for studying photovoltaic plant behavior. In particular, performance loss and remaining-useful-lifetime calculations rely on trustful input data. Furthermore, a regular stream of high quality is the basis for pro-active operation and management activities which ensure a [...] Read more.
Photovoltaic monitoring data are the primary source for studying photovoltaic plant behavior. In particular, performance loss and remaining-useful-lifetime calculations rely on trustful input data. Furthermore, a regular stream of high quality is the basis for pro-active operation and management activities which ensure a smooth operation of PV plants. The raw data under investigation are electrical measurements and usually meteorological data such as in-plane irradiance and temperature. Usually, performance analyses follow a strict pattern of checking input data quality followed by the application of appropriate filter, choosing a key performance indicator and the application of certain methodologies to receive a final result. In this context, this paper focuses on four main objectives. We present common photovoltaics monitoring data quality issues, provide visual guidelines on how to detect and evaluate these, provide new data imputation approaches, and discuss common filtering approaches. Data imputation techniques for module temperature and irradiance data are discussed and compared to classical approaches. This work is intended to be a soft introduction into PV monitoring data analysis discussing best practices and issues an analyst might face. It was seen that if a sufficient amount of training data is available, multivariate adaptive regression splines yields good results for module temperature imputation while histogram-based gradient boosting regression outperforms classical approaches for in-plane irradiance transposition. Based on tested filtering procedures, it is believed that standards should be developed including relatively low irradiance thresholds together with strict power-irradiance pair filters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Low-Cost I–V Tracer for PV Modules under Real Operating Conditions
Energies 2020, 13(17), 4320; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174320 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Solar photovoltaic technologies have undergone significant scientific development. To ensure the transfer of knowledge through the training of qualified personnel, didactic tools that can be acquired or built at a reasonable price are needed. Most training and research centres have restrictions on acquiring [...] Read more.
Solar photovoltaic technologies have undergone significant scientific development. To ensure the transfer of knowledge through the training of qualified personnel, didactic tools that can be acquired or built at a reasonable price are needed. Most training and research centres have restrictions on acquiring specific equipment due to its high cost. With this in mind, this article presents the development and transfer of a low-cost I–V curve tracer acquisition system. The device is made up of embedded systems with all the necessary hardware and software for its operation. The hardware and software presented are open source and have a low cost, i.e., the estimated material cost of the system is less than 200 euros. For its development, four institutions from three different countries participated in the project. Three photovoltaic technologies were used to measure the uncertainties related to the equipment developed. In addition, the system can be transferred for use as an academic or research tool, as long as the measurement does not need to be certified. Two accredited laboratories have certified the low uncertainties in the measurement of the proposed system. Full article
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